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Alfred Hitchcock Movies



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  #101  
Old November 16th, 2009, 12:40 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

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Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 View Post
Oh, and this is directed @ ComicBookWorm- Is Spellbound the film that you were referring to in response to my question about Psycho?
Yes it was. I just couldn't be more specific without ruining it for you. I thought it was implausible too. And I didn't understand all of it until I saw it a few times. Also, the Freudianism was overdone, but it was all the rage back then. The Salvador Dali dream sequence was simultaneously interesting and pretentious.

I liked it less than my top tier of movies. I liked Suspicion more, but not that much more. The original ending had Joan Fontaine die from poisoned milk. But the studio didn't think the moviegoers would accept an evil Cary Grant. Suspicion is at the lower end of my top tier. If I get motivated I'll try and rank some of them.


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  #102  
Old November 26th, 2009, 10:31 am
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

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Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm View Post
ITo Catch a Thief has never done that much for me, but I love Cary Grant and he saves the movie.

Be sure to watch The 39 Steps since it is almost as much fun as The Lady Vanishes.
Those were the latest two Hitchcock films I watched, and I'd have to say in large part I don't agree with either account My thoughts-
Quote:
Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 View Post

To Catch a Thief-

I'd read that many find this one boring but I found it entertaining and it was amusing even at its low points. Now admittedly the storyline is a bit weak and predictable (yes, for once I was able to solve the mystery in a Hitchcock film!) but come on...it's Cary Grant and Grace Kelly! God, she was such a beauty. And I'd love to have this on DVD cause the background scenery and cinematography is just breathtaking...

Acting- 10
Script- 7
Visuals- 10
Sound- 9
Editing- 9

Total Score = 90%
Quote:
Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 View Post

The 39 Steps-

I don't think I was really in the mood for Hitchcock and I was expecting something more exciting. I also thought that "the 39 steps" would be integral to the plot somehow...but as it turns out, it was just a MacGuffin. And being as this film is from the 1930's the picture and sound quality is quite poor. Overall, it has good acting and a fairly interesting story with some twists, but Hitchcock has done so much better.

Acting- 8
Script- 7
Visuals- 6
Sound- 6.5
Editing- 8

Total Score = 71%
So, here is my updated ranking-

Psycho- 98% (IMDB Top 250)
Rear Window- 97% (IMDB Top 250)
Strangers on a Train- 97% (IMDB Top 250
Vertigo- 96% (IMDB Top 250)
North By Northwest- 95% (IMDB Top 250)
Shadow of a Doubt- 94% (IMDB Top 250)
Spellbound-92%
To Catch a Thief- 90%
Dial "M" For Murder- 90% (IMDB Top 250)
Suspicion- 89%
The Lady Vanishes- 88%
Rope- 80% (IMDB Top 250)
Notorious- 79% (IMDB Top 250)
Rebecca- 77% (IMDB Top 250)
The 39 Steps- 71%
The Lodger- 67%


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  #103  
Old November 28th, 2009, 1:43 am
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

^I really like To Catch a Thief, too (dare I say "underrated?"). It is more laid-back than most of Hitchcock's work, but it's a very entertaining yarn (that's right, "yarn" - it seems fitting). Plus, Hitchcock at his peak directing Cary Grant and Grace Kelly? It doesn't get much better than that.


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  #104  
Old November 29th, 2009, 5:23 am
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

So, I'm looking into some DVD's to ask relatives for Christmas...but I'm discovering there have been quite a few different releases!

Does anyone who owns some Hitchcock movies on DVD have recommendations? It looks like the Legacy Series might be the best. They are like 2 disc special edition releases that are supposedly the best quality transfers and they contain more special features. Sounds good.

There are also a number of box sets, but I'm not sure how the film quality and special features compare to the individuals releases.

Can anyone shed some light on this? I did come across this site, which has been handy- http://www.dvdbeaver.com/film/compare.htm

Though I haven't been able to figure out what one release in particular is. They all say "An Alfred Hitchcock Masterpiece" across the top

Example- http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/ima...478107&sr=1-13

I'm wondering if these are simply those from the Masterpiece Collection box set available as individual titles Amazon has a lot of 'em...

BTW, I thought I'd quote a few blurbs from that site I found intriguing

Quote:
Alfred Hitchcock, 'The Master', is the most widely known and influential director in the history of cinema. His prolific body of work spanned over 50 years. After some exposure to German-expressionism 'Hitch' established his preferred niche in the mystery/suspense genre where his films dominated public appeal for decades. His meticulous preparation and understanding of every facet of the plot and production medium of each project allowed the actual filming process to be considered a foregone conclusion. It would, hopefully, be a decision-less process with every contingency already thoroughly considered. To deter studio post-intervention with his films Hitch would strive to limit his shooting process to only the required scenes. With each sequence essential to the plot, fitting as cohesively as the pieces of a puzzle, it left no other conceivable manner for them to be edited.
It's interesting how nobody seems to take this approach anymore. Nowadays they'll shoot like 50 takes of one scene...a bit ridiculous, IMO

Quote:
The problem when approaching any of the major Hitchcock’s are, that they will overwhelm one to such a degree, that they overshadow any other film and one almost instinctively thinks “the best”. The amount of details, the care for them, the perfection in direction, the playfulness, the structure of the narrative, the depth of even the simplest characters, are but few of the elements, which still today, over a half of a century later, makes his film so breathtaking and inviting. One can revisit them countless times, yet they never grow old nor boring, quiet the opposite, the more you watch, the more you want to watch. While being simple suspense thrillers on the surface, each of them possess an intelligent literary thematic depth, which makes them timeless classics.
I must say, I have def noticed this. For a while there it seemed every Hitchcock film I watched was better than the last!

And maybe I have just been overwhelmed or whatever...but many I would consider some of "the best" and Rear Window, Strangers on a Train, Psycho, Vertigo, and North By Northwest are all in my Top 20! There's no doubt that Hitchcock is now my favorite director.

However, I can't say yet whether I agree on their re-watchability. I still think the very nature of mystery/suspense makes this a weakness...


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  #105  
Old November 29th, 2009, 12:38 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

Oh the re-watching reveals a lot. You catch little bits here and there that weren't as obvious the first time around. The playfulness becomes even more fun.


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  #106  
Old November 29th, 2009, 11:43 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

A follow up to my last post. Anyone own any of these bargain sets or know if the quality is any good?

http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Al...ent_(USA,_2008)
http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Be...ion_(USA,_2008)
http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Al...deo_(USA,_2007)
http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Th...ion_(USA,_2007)
http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Al...ate_(USA,_2007)
http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Hi...ion_(USA,_2006)
http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Al...ent_(USA,_2005)
http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Al...ent_(USA,_2005)
http://www.hitchcockwiki.com/wiki/Th...ion_(USA,_2005)

I think the titles are mis-leading cause the majority don't seem to be his most reputable films. It's mainly his early stuff and there are a lot I've yet to see but don't really care to watch. Still, I'd consider them for the price. This one in particular looks like a good stocking stuffer-

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=8044461

I read some really bad reviews about it on Amazon, but even for poor quality it's an unbelievable deal. I'd get it just for The Lady Vanishes.


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  #107  
Old December 7th, 2009, 9:35 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

Hmm, does nobody own any Hitchcock films on DVD?


Anyways, with the latest film I saw I've now watched all of his Best Picture nominated films and of the 4 I'd have to say this one was best...

Quote:
Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 View Post

Foreign Correspondent-

This really wasn't what I expected, but it was quite thrilling! I didn't think the acting was on par with Hitchcock's best, but it was still great. An interesting story too. Oh, and while it's not the most important aspect...the special effects are incredible for a film released in 1940!

Personally, I think this should have won Best Picture over Rebecca. Both are Hitchcock films from 1940...but I enjoyed this far more.

Acting- 9
Script- 9.5
Visuals- 10
Sound- 8.5
Editing- 9.5

Total Score= 93%
Oh, I forgot to mention in my review there that the film also had it's fair share of Hitchcock's special sense of humor, which was great


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  #108  
Old December 13th, 2009, 2:11 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

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Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 View Post
Hmm, does nobody own any Hitchcock films on DVD?
That I do, that I do. I've only watched a few of them, though. The only ones I remember are 'The Cheney Vase' and 'The Sorcerers Apprentice'.


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  #109  
Old December 13th, 2009, 5:37 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

I have Rebecca on the DVD, but there are almost no extras at all; just the chance of watching it on my laptop and in hte original version.


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  #110  
Old December 27th, 2009, 4:41 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

So for Christmas I did indeed receive quite a few individual Hitchcock DVD's and I'm more than happy with them.

I got the first 5 on this list as well as the regular DVD release of Dial "M" for Murder. The 3 Legacy Series versions are especially nice. The discs are packaged in a case that is like a hardcover book and they have a good deal of special features, though I haven't watched any yet.

All of the 2 Disc Special Editions have been digitally remastered and the picture looks fantastic! I scanned through them all on our HDTV and it's really amazing how great they look. It's incredible how they can do that to old film reels. To be honest, I have a hard time seeing how a Blu-Ray could be much better. Some of the DVD screencaps I'd seen were un-impressive but they look great on our TV at least. The only one that is a little fuzzy or whatever is Dial "M" for Murder, but even that one is satisfactory. So yeah, they are pricey...but well worth it


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Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm View Post
Oh the re-watching reveals a lot. You catch little bits here and there that weren't as obvious the first time around. The playfulness becomes even more fun.
Hmm, at the moment I'm of two minds about this.

First, I re-watched Rear Window a few weeks ago and...well, here's my review-

Quote:
Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 View Post

I must say it's even more brilliant than I remember since first watching a few months back.

Naturally the element of suspense is gone now...but you notice the little nuances that one might miss during an initial viewing.

Back when I saw it I was still just giving an overall "gut" rating so to speak...so here's my (updated score) using the new method-

Acting- 10
Script- 10
Visuals- 10
Sound- 9
Editing- 10

Total Score = 98%

That's a percentage point higher than last time and this time the only thing I docked for was some irritating music... But the flawless acting, story, cinematography (so unique) and editing (I noticed purpose in the scenes that I didn't before) make this a true masterpiece. I am shocked this film wasn't even nominated for Best Picture in what looks like a weak year (though I haven't seen any of the nominees)

http://www.imdb.com/Sections/Awards/...wards_USA/1955

Anyways, Rear Window might be my favorite film now (I'd have to re-watch Shawshank Redemption and a few others to be sure)

If not, it's certainly in my Top 5!


However, I re-watched North By Northwest yesterday with my family. They thought it was boring...and admittedly I sorta have to agree.

With the element of suspense no longer there for me, it just felt like a long drawn out "man on the run" film. It was even the other way around from when I re-watched Rear Window. I mean here I was actually noticing pointless scenes that didn't have any apparent purpose

Now, don't get me wrong. I still think it has great acting and production value (still a masterpiece)...it just doesn't do much for me now.


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  #111  
Old June 14th, 2010, 11:41 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

I just saw on The Digital Bits that there is indeed a 50th Anniversary Edition of Psycho being released on Blu-ray October 19. I don't own the film, so I'm looking forward to that one.


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  #112  
Old June 24th, 2010, 11:45 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

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Originally Posted by IenjoyAcidPops View Post
I just saw on The Digital Bits that there is indeed a 50th Anniversary Edition of Psycho being released on Blu-ray October 19. I don't own the film, so I'm looking forward to that one.
That's awesome news, but I don't have Blu-ray yet


Anyways, hmm what have I seen since I last posted in here?


Well, I moved on to Capra and Wilder for a while but I've begun to come back and watch more of Hitch's films. I think so far the only others I've seen are Stage Fright, Lifeboat, and I Confess...and I posted this in the rate the last film thread but I figure I might get response here

Unfortunately it seems I may have exhausted all the really great Hitchcock movies...these last 3 have been more or less disappointing.

However, I think the plan is to watch at least the rest from the 1940's onward (don't care to see the silents or any more of the British productions) and see if I can't find some diamonds in the rough. Here's what I have left...anyone find any of these particularly great?

Mr. and Mrs. Smith
Saboteur
The Paradine Case
Under Capricorn

The Trouble with Harry
The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956)
The Wrong Man

The Birds
Marnie
Torn Curtain
Topaz

Frenzy
Family Plot


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  #113  
Old June 25th, 2010, 12:40 am
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

Which ones have you seen? Which ones would you recommend? Any interesting trivia?

1) What have I seen?

Out of 53 films, I've seen 32 (if I'm counting correctly). That's about 60% of his films.

Because of some work I was doing on a book, I've seen all the British films through 1935 that were available as of 1998.

That includes 6 of his 9 silent movies:
The Lodger
Easy Virtue
The Ring
The Farmer's Wife
Champagne
The Manxman

All of his early sound films, 1930-1935 (except Waltzes from Vienna):
Blackmail
Juno and the Paycock
Murder!
The Skin Game
Number Seventeen
Rich and Strange
The Man Who Knew Too Much (original version, with Peter Lorre)
The 39 Steps

What did all that viewing get me? Well, among other things, it got me on a film convention panel with Pat Hitchcock! (Alfred's daughter), discussing Hitchcock's early films!

Now, here's what I've seen from the "American" period:
Rebecca
Shadow of a Doubt
Spellbound
Notorious
Rope
Strangers on a Train
Dial "M" for Murder
Rear Window
To Catch a Thief
The Trouble with Harry
The Man Who Knew Too Much (version with Jimmy Stewart)
Vertigo
North by Northwest
Psycho
The Birds
Torn Curtain
Topaz
Frenzy

Though Frenzy is a British film, it was made after Hitchcock moved his operations to America, so I'm counting it in his "American period."

Most of those films I saw strictly for "play." However, I have also written multiple times on Psycho, so I've seen that film both for work and for play.

2) Recommendations?

Of the films from his American period, my strongest recommendations are for: Rebecca, Strangers on a Train, Rear Window, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Psycho, The Birds, and Frenzy (if you can handle it).

Of the early British films, you have to realize that these are rather primitive by today's standards - and even by the standards of the time. The British film industry had not caught up to the German or American industries - largely because cinema was not highly regarded in British society during the 1920s and 1930s. Cinema was considered inferior to the stage (which is why most of Hitchcock's early films are stage plays set on film).

In fact, Hitchcock was the first great filmmaker of the British cinema - but since the industry itself was so backwards, he spent most of his time battling with studio heads over creativity and budget issues - and grumbling about the assignments they gave him to shoot. This is a key reason that he came to America in 1939 - and after the success of Rebecca, he was able to set himself up to produce his own movies, which had been his goal for about 15 years.

At any rate, the film stock of Hitchcock's early films is very high-contrast, black-and-white stock. It's nowhere close to being as beautiful as the many-textured (and many shades of gray) stock used in the German silent cinema (Fritz Lang, F.W. Murnau, in particular).

That said, of particular interest are:


The Lodger - Hitchcock's first film that made it in front of audiences. It made him a household name in Britain. Silent.

The Ring - His first really good film. Silent.

Blackmail - The first sound film in the British film industry. Very interesting use of sound.

The Man Who Knew too Much (1934 version) - His comeback film, after some disappointing work between 1931 and 1933.

The 39 Steps - His first fully mature movie, in the sense that he is now fully in command of his art/craft.

3) Trivia?

Oh, I've got a TON of trivia! How about this? - Hitchcock was not just a filmmaker. He was also an early theoretician of film. Many of the topics he was theorizing about in the 1930s later became standard practices - such as the use of the film soundtrack. Early sound movies - if they had a soundtrack at all - just slapped some music over the top of the movie. After all, filmmakers were coming out of the Silent Era, when lots of house organists just improvised a soundtrack to the film. Hitchcock started theorizing in the 1930s that the music should be tied to the action of the film. This was a radical idea at the time. It has long since become standard practice.

As for his practice of appearing in his own movies (the trivia that HBL started this thread off with), I do have an interesting bit of trivia about that... i.e. how it started!

The first film in which Hitchcock appeared was The Lodger (1926 - general release in 1927). He actually appears in two scenes - as a newspaper editor towards the early part of the film, and as a member of a mob chasing the supposed murderer towards the end of the film. The reason he appeared was that he was short on cast. He just needed a body for those spots, so he became the body. His later appearances become more intentional and often whimsical - not necessary.


I have a lot of other trivia, but won't bore everyone with it... unless someone asks!


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Last edited by ccollinsmith; June 25th, 2010 at 2:25 am. Reason: corrected a film title
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  #114  
Old June 25th, 2010, 12:53 am
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

^ Wow, impressive!

Granted that I actually see all those I listed above I'll end up with about the same total as you (albeit with far less variety) Anyways, I have some questions for you...

1. Without spoiling much, what do you mean by this?

Quote:
Frenzy (if you can handle it)

2. Which film were you actually referring to here?

Quote:
Rope - His first really good film. Silent.
Because I've seen Rope and it's not a silent film No offense, I'm sure it was just typo or something, but I'm curious what film you actually intended even though I have little desire to watch any of his silent films.


3. Which version of The Man Who Knew Too Much is better?

4. Would you offer your thoughts on those films I listed that I've yet to see? Any I should avoid at all costs or whatever?


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  #115  
Old June 25th, 2010, 2:22 am
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

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Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 View Post
^ Wow, impressive!
Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lcbaseball22
1. Without spoiling much, what do you mean by this?
Since this is a FF Forum and we've got kids here, I was just giving a little warning that this is a very R-rated film, and it's definitely not suitable for kids (or for the faint of heart!).

More specifically, Hitchcock meets the 1970s! He's no longer constrained by the Hays Code, and is able in Frenzy to show what I think is his most brutal murder. It's not "slasher" shocking, but it's long and drawn out, and there's nothing concealed - as there is in Psycho. Also, I just think Hitchcock really heightens the tension in Frenzy. And he also makes one of the greatest uses of cinematic silence I've ever seen. It really stood the hair up on the back of my neck! I think you'll know what I mean when you see it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lcbaseball22
2. Which film were you actually referring to here?

Because I've seen Rope and it's not a silent film No offense, I'm sure it was just typo or something, but I'm curious what film you actually intended even though I have little desire to watch any of his silent films.
I'll go back and edit it. I was referring to The Ring - a 1928 film that I think is probably his most mature silent work. Largely because of studio interference, none of his other silent films after The Ring are really that great imo.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lcbaseball22
3. Which version of The Man Who Knew Too Much is better?
That's an interesting question. I prefer the 1934 version. It's a smaller, less elaborate film. It has a great performance by Peter Lorre in his first English-language film (he learned his lines phonetically, as he did not yet speak English!). It's got a quirkier, more British sense of humor. Much as I adore Jimmy Stewart, I've never really liked the later version. And it's the version I saw first, so it's not like I was comparing it to the earlier version. I just didn't like it that much.

BUT, this is a matter of personal taste. Lots of people prefer the later version, so I assume this is just a personal quirk and not a statement about which film is actually better. Basically, both films are good enough to have their partisans.

Quote:
Originally Posted by lcbaseball22
4. Would you offer your thoughts on those films I listed that I've yet to see? Any I should avoid at all costs or whatever?
Okay, here are the films you've listed that I've seen:

The Trouble with Harry - Very different from most American Hitchcock. It's sort of a weird dark comedy about a dead body.

The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) - Lavish, technicolor, set in Morocco. Doris Day sings "Que Sera Sera." Basically, this is a kidnapping melodrama, full of international intrigue.

The Birds - This is one of my very favorite Hitchcock films. It's a "nature gone wild," potentially apocalyptic nightmare. It's almost everything that Shyamalan's The Happening wanted to be... and failed to be. Amazing movie, imo.

Torn Curtain - Cold War spy drama. I don't remember much about it except that I didn't find it especially engaging.

Topaz - This is the first Hitchcock movie I ever saw in the theater, and I was pretty young so I don't remember much about it. It had a lot of marketing hype (basically, they wouldn't seat you if you came in 5 minutes late). I don't remember much about it except that I think it was about spies!

Frenzy - Another Hitchcock serial killer movie. Has some very quirky British humor (mostly centered around the Scotland Yard detective's family affairs), but is a very tense and intense film about a series of brutal murders taking place in London. I thought it was really good.

Enjoy your viewing!


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  #116  
Old June 25th, 2010, 4:19 pm
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

Quote:
Originally Posted by ccollinsmith View Post
Since this is a FF Forum and we've got kids here, I was just giving a little warning that this is a very R-rated film, and it's definitely not suitable for kids (or for the faint of heart!).

More specifically, Hitchcock meets the 1970s! He's no longer constrained by the Hays Code, and is able in Frenzy to show what I think is his most brutal murder. It's not "slasher" shocking, but it's long and drawn out, and there's nothing concealed - as there is in Psycho. Also, I just think Hitchcock really heightens the tension in Frenzy. And he also makes one of the greatest uses of cinematic silence I've ever seen. It really stood the hair up on the back of my neck! I think you'll know what I mean when you see it.
Ah, I see. Wow, yeah that could be interesting. I hope this doesn't seem morbid, but I'm looking to watching this one now


Quote:
That's an interesting question. I prefer the 1934 version. It's a smaller, less elaborate film. It has a great performance by Peter Lorre in his first English-language film (he learned his lines phonetically, as he did not yet speak English!). It's got a quirkier, more British sense of humor. Much as I adore Jimmy Stewart, I've never really liked the later version. And it's the version I saw first, so it's not like I was comparing it to the earlier version. I just didn't like it that much.

BUT, this is a matter of personal taste. Lots of people prefer the later version, so I assume this is just a personal quirk and not a statement about which film is actually better. Basically, both films are good enough to have their partisans.
Hmm, well at the moment I think I only plan to watch the Jimmy Stewart version cause he's one of my favorite actors and I could pretty much watch anything just for his performances...but perhaps I will watch 'em both and compare them myself.

Quote:
Okay, here are the films you've listed that I've seen:

The Trouble with Harry - Very different from most American Hitchcock. It's sort of a weird dark comedy about a dead body.

The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956) - Lavish, technicolor, set in Morocco. Doris Day sings "Que Sera Sera." Basically, this is a kidnapping melodrama, full of international intrigue.

The Birds - This is one of my very favorite Hitchcock films. It's a "nature gone wild," potentially apocalyptic nightmare. It's almost everything that Shyamalan's The Happening wanted to be... and failed to be. Amazing movie, imo.

Torn Curtain - Cold War spy drama. I don't remember much about it except that I didn't find it especially engaging.

Topaz - This is the first Hitchcock movie I ever saw in the theater, and I was pretty young so I don't remember much about it. It had a lot of marketing hype (basically, they wouldn't seat you if you came in 5 minutes late). I don't remember much about it except that I think it was about spies!

Frenzy - Another Hitchcock serial killer movie. Has some very quirky British humor (mostly centered around the Scotland Yard detective's family affairs), but is a very tense and intense film about a series of brutal murders taking place in London. I thought it was really good.

Enjoy your viewing!
Thanks!


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  #117  
Old July 4th, 2010, 12:27 pm
lcbaseball22  Male.gif lcbaseball22 is offline
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

I wanted to discuss a certain topic here that I've come across on the IMDB boards...

The promp- "Hitchcock can't do endings"


While I originally would've agreed with this statement the more Hitchcock films I watched it became apparent that it's not that he couldn't (I mean really? he was a brilliant filmaker...you really think he couldn't? ) but that he just chose to end his films differently, his own style.

Instead of tying everything up for us nice and tidy his endings are often abrupt and leaves things to the imagination. I suppose you could say he credits the audience more then most. In addition he doesn't bog down the end showing and/or explaining relatively unnecessary stuff...like little details where we can deduce what happened on our own or stuff that really doesn't matter (ie the various MacGuffins)

Here's just a few examples of famous or imfamous (depending on your perspective) Hitchcock endings...

Vertigo
Spoiler: show
Kim Novac falls off the bell tower (did she jump or was she startled?) and film ends with a shot of James Stewart leaning over the edge (will he jump?) The End, yes seriously that's it...although there is an alternate ending out there that was made for foreign censors

North By Northwest
Spoiler: show
Cary Grant and Eva Marie Saint are clinging onto the side of a cliff for dear life when suddenly help arrives. Eva Marie desperately reaches for Cary's outstretched hand and the next shot we see is Cary Grant pulling Eva Marie up into bed on a train (as he calls her Mrs. Thornhill) as the train speeds into a tunnel (symbolizing the consummation of marriage)

Rear Window
Spoiler: show
James Stewart is in danger, there's a struggle, and he's nearly thrown out the window. He calls out for help and the film is sped up (this is somewhat comical ) as we see people rushing over. The villain is apprehended and Stewart loses his grip on the windowsill falling to the ground as two men half catch him. People gather around, there's some exchange of words, a few big questions answered (though not completely) and then we cut to a last scene furthering some of the neighbor's stories as the camera pans in the window showing James Stewart asleep (with 2 broken legs now) and Grace Kelly reading a book back in Stewart's apartment (do they get married? we don't know)


Oh, and a more comical ending was in the 1956 version of The Man Who Knew Too Much, which I just watched earlier tonight

Spoiler: show
James Stewart and his boy escape from their would be killer and re-unite with the mother (Doris Day) Now cut to the final scene of the family returning to the hotel where their friends have been waiting for them..."I'm sorry we took so long, but we had to go pick up Hank"

The End


If anyone cares to see the discussion that prompted this, you can find it here- http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0049470/.../149286303?p=1


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Last edited by lcbaseball22; July 4th, 2010 at 12:38 pm.
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  #118  
Old July 4th, 2010, 4:30 pm
Noldus  Male.gif Noldus is offline
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

Quote:
Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 View Post
Vertigo
Spoiler: show
Kim Novac falls off the bell tower (did she jump or was she startled?) and film ends with a shot of James Stewart leaning over the edge (will he jump?) The End, yes seriously that's it...although there is an alternate ending out there that was made for foreign censors
I was on the edge of my seat during the ending:
Spoiler: show
As Scottie overcomes his fear of heights and finds out the truth, I dreaded he would throw her off the tower, but they seemed to sort it out. Happy ending! But wait...A dark figure appears out of nowhere (I almost jumped) and Judy falls/throws herself off the bell tower While this is a depressing ending, it is very appropriate for the mood of the film and opens up for different interpretations.

I am under the impression that Judy commited suicide because of her desperation to be loved. She probably thought he didn't want her now and felt she had nothing worth living for anymore and saw the opportunity to jump when Scottie was distracted by the arrival of the nun. Poor girl! Obviously, she was a prostitute and pretended to be Madeleine for the money. But as we know, she fell in love with Scottie and when he knocked on her door, she hesitatingly let him into the apartment and her life again. She wrote a letter explaining everything, but burned it because she wouldn't want the truth about her to come out, nor to lose him. What's interesting about this movie is that the "twist" is revealed three-quarters of the way through, which IMHO is good because it makes the audience feel Judy's despair and also gives her motivation for letting him re-make her into Madeleine's image, despite wanting him to love her.



Last edited by Noldus; July 4th, 2010 at 4:43 pm.
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  #119  
Old July 10th, 2010, 10:21 pm
Noldus  Male.gif Noldus is offline
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

I watched North by Northwest again and I don't think the abrupt ending panned out well, but that's just my opinion. Notorious ended quite abruptly too, but that worked incredibly well.

Back to North by Northwest: While it isn't among my personal favourites, I realize it may be the ultimate Hitchcock movie. It's extremely well-made and entertaining, it has humour, romance, a memorable score and there are lots of action scenes and set pieces, e.g. Mount Rushmore. Oh, and I'd like to share this unique high-angle shot. Basically, it shows us how small and helpless he is against those chasing him and how slim the odds are for surviving. Thoughts?
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Last edited by Noldus; July 10th, 2010 at 10:28 pm.
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  #120  
Old July 11th, 2010, 10:15 am
Yoshimi25  Female.gif Yoshimi25 is offline
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Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies

Psyco for the sheer scariness....but my fave has to be The Lady Vanishes...because secretly, I've always wanted to be in the wrong place at the right time.


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