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The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson



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  #21  
Old January 20th, 2011, 5:57 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

I have read all of the books and i really loved the first one It was amazing it was a bit violent at times , i never read this type of book before i was blown away . The other two are not as good but are still worth reading . I have not seen any of the movies but i hope they live up to how good the books are .


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  #22  
Old March 6th, 2011, 4:18 am
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

Finally finished the series today. I'd have to say the first one is definitely my favorite. Although it did drag a bit in the begining with the W affair, it didn't picked up when the other events started taking place. I'm not sure at the moment how I'd rank the other two.


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  #23  
Old April 10th, 2012, 5:37 am
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

Just finished the first book. A good thriller but the characters were paper-thin and at times the writing was extremely clunky (although this could be a problem with the translation).

The relentless misandry was also a minus.


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  #24  
Old April 10th, 2012, 11:01 am
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

Am I the only person who found Blomqvist an insufferable Mary Sue?


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  #25  
Old April 10th, 2012, 4:02 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by MmeBergerac View Post
BTW, it looks like every country has translated the titles in its way... The translation of the Spanish titles are:
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo - The Men Who Didn't Love Women
That title is a direct translation. I guess the publishers felt the original title would not sell well in English, hence "Dragon Tattoo".

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
Am I the only person who found Blomqvist an insufferable Mary Sue?
You are not alone! My brother in law, who does not even know the term and rarely reads fiction, made the same observation. (As he put it, "Oh, so the author was a journalist, and the main character is a crusading journalist who gets all the big stories and wins fame and gets all the attractive women.")

And I tend to agree. I can deal with him, but he is not a favorite character.

That would be Lisbeth, who I found to be (despite her mandatory involvment with Mary Sue ) a really interesting female character.


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  #26  
Old April 10th, 2012, 4:35 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

I must be one of the few people who didn't like Lisbeth. She was a textbook sociopath. (The fact that she seemed constructed from a psychiatry text rather than developed could be the problem.)


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  #27  
Old April 10th, 2012, 4:54 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

Quote:
Originally Posted by MmeBergerac View Post
BTW, it looks like every country has translated the titles in its way... The translation of the Spanish titles are:
The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo - The Men Who Didn't Love Women
The Girl Who Played With Fire - The Girl Who dreamed on a Match and a Gas Can
The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest - The Queen in the Palace of Draughts

Don't ask me who decides the titles; I have no idea...
I actually prefer the English/American Titles (Dragon, Fire and Hornet's Nest) because after you read the book the title makes a lot more sense. Well, maybe except for the first one. It bothered me that we never really found out why Lisbeth got that tattoo or what it was supposed to represent.

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Originally Posted by TaafeMJ View Post
I read all three. The first one I thought was pretty good. The second one I enjoyed more. The third I had a really hard time getting through.
Me too!! The third book seriously needed editing and the number of new characters needed to be about cut in half.

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My impression of the series as a whole is that while it was a pretty decent read, I'm still waiting for the part where it's a worldwide hit. Lisbeth was an excellent character, but there were large parts of the story that I just found myself not caring about (like Millenium, for example).
Like Erica Berger. Who cares!

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Originally Posted by xhanax315 View Post
I enjoyed it a lot. It was definitely difficult to get into, the first chapters I was thinking to myself, "What have I gottten into?" I was glad I had hung in there, once I got to the main mystery of the story surrounding Harriet, I was hooked.
My mom gave me the first two books for my birthday and told me to skim the first chapter because it was so deadly dull. I didn't listen and consequently it took me about three weeks to really get into the story but once you get past the boring beginning it's a great read.

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
Am I the only person who found Blomqvist an insufferable Mary Sue?
No. I actually prefer the characterisation he was given in the American film (played by Daniel Craig) - he was made into a pretty sissy metrosexual bimbo which played pretty well against Lisbeth's stronger, more masculine characterisation. For all the [staff edit] that film was getting before its release and how everyone was saying it was too soon to do the American remake I really enjoyed it (Rooney made a better Lisbeth than Noomi for me, Noomi was too conventionally pretty) and I agreed with pretty much all of the choices they made about what to cut and what to keep.

I watched all three swedish films and was kind of disappointed by the third film. The book has such vindictive stand up and cheer moments...
Spoiler: show
... during the trial as Dr. Teleborian is being ripped to shreds.

It felt at times in the film that that whole story line lost its impact because of all the other stuff going on. You want to stick to Lisbeth so badly that those scenes suffered because of the overly complicated plot and the need to wrap up the stories of too many characters.


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  #28  
Old April 10th, 2012, 5:26 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by TaafeMJ View Post
there were large parts of the story that I just found myself not caring about (like Millenium, for example).
The points Larsson was making about financial journalism in the use of Millennium were valid. Unfortunately, they didn't integrate with the rest of the story.


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  #29  
Old April 10th, 2012, 5:43 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by Wab View Post
I must be one of the few people who didn't like Lisbeth. She was a textbook sociopath. (The fact that she seemed constructed from a psychiatry text rather than developed could be the problem.)
If she was built to match any one label, the one I would have chosen is "Autistic Savant" (albeit a "high-functioning" one). Spoilers for all books may follow...

Spoiler: show
Granted, by many conventional measures she is not "successful". However, we know in her case this is often a matter of successful adaptation to truly extreme circumstances. She is thoroughly self-sufficient and able to make and stick to long-term plans.

Also, I did not find her to be callous and unfeeling. Her early instance of violance (against her father) was it seemed to me motivated by an awareness of her mother's suffering, and she is capable of making (and keeping) friends as the respect of the "good" advocate (whose name I forget), her employer at the security firm, among her hacker associates, and Blomqvist all show. Further, some of her violence, it seemed to me, reflected a genuine interest in justice, not only for herself, but for other women; it was why I thought she found the Vanger case so worthy of her attention. In her experience, justice has to be looked for outside of the legal system.

Finally, heck yes she is violent! But given that her personal experience of the legal system from her childhood onwards was that it would go out of its way to inflict injustices on her and people close to her, fail to prevent, or even worse, condone/enable additional abuses against her, I don't find it surprising.

In many ways, she seems to me a female/feminist "Batman", with the twist that many of the villains she is up against have the protection of the legal system.


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  #30  
Old April 10th, 2012, 5:46 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by arithmancer View Post
Spoiler: show
Finally, heck yes she is violent! But given that her personal experience of the legal system from her childhood onwards was that it would go out of its way to inflict injustices on her and people close to her, fail to prevent, or even worse, condone/enable additional abuses against her, I don't find it surprising.
I find her use of extreme sexual violence not only surprising but inexcusable.

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If she was built to match any one label, the one I would have chosen is "Autistic Savant" (albeit a "high-functioning" one).
She is a sociopath (even a psychopath) according to the definitions of Antisocial Personality Disorder/Dissocial Personality Disorder.

Dissocial personality disorder It is characterized by at least 3 of the following:

Callous unconcern for the feelings of others
Gross and persistent attitude of irresponsibility and disregard for social norms, rules, and obligations.
Incapacity to maintain enduring relationships, though having no difficulty in establishing them
Very low tolerance to frustration and a low threshold for discharge of aggression, including violence.
Incapacity to experience guilt or to profit from experience, particularly punishment.
Markedly prone to blame others or to offer plausible rationalizations for the behavior that has brought the person into conflict with society


Antisocial personality disorder A) There is a pervasive pattern of disregard for and violation of the rights of others occurring since age 15 years, as indicated by three or more of the following:

failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest;
deception, as indicated by repeatedly lying, use of aliases, or conning others for personal profit or pleasure;

impulsiveness or failure to plan ahead;
irritability and aggressiveness, as indicated by repeated physical fights or assaults;
reckless disregard for safety of self or others;
consistent irresponsibility, as indicated by repeated failure to sustain consistent work behavior or honor financial obligations;
lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another;

B) The individual is at least age 18 years.
C) There is evidence of conduct disorder with onset before age 15 years.
D) The occurrence of antisocial behavior is not exclusively during the course of schizophrenia or a manic episode.


Yes, it's from Wiki but the citations are good and it provides a more succinct defintion.

Quote:
Spoiler: show
In many ways, she seems to me a female/feminist "Batman", with the twist that many of the villains she is up against have the protection of the legal system.
In no way is she like Batman. Batman uses violence to subdue/capture, not punish, miscreants, it is not an end in itself. More to the point he turns them over to the proper authorities when he brings them down.


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Last edited by Wab; April 10th, 2012 at 9:19 pm.
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  #31  
Old April 27th, 2012, 4:09 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by Wab View Post
In no way is she like Batman. Batman uses violence to subdue/capture, not punish, miscreants, it is not an end in itself. More to the point he turns them over to the proper authorities when he brings them down.
Lisbeth never has the opportunity to turn anyone in to the "proper authorities" because she herself is a victim of them. She is the ongoing focus and priority of a high-ranking government organization whose aim is to actively cover up the indiscretions of a true criminal in order that their own questionably legal actions might remain undiscovered and she stepped right in the middle of that.

While it might have been the "right" thing for Lisbeth to turn people over to the "proper authorities," in her experience no good has ever come from dealing with them. They don't listen to her, they don't believe her when she tells them the truth, the conspiracy to defame her character by SAPO was so successful that even if she was completely in the right when she turns a criminal in to the police her personal history, her internment in a mental institution, her previous criminal record that includes assult and arrests would probably lead to herself being arrested, especially if SAPO got wind of what was going on. They would use any and every opportunity they could to get her locked up again.

While I wouldn't go so far as Arithmancer in saying she's the female Batman of Sweden, I do absolutely agree with the statement that her hands are tied as far as the actions she can take againt her opponents because her opponents have the legal system on their side. They are the police, they are the SAPO agents. As far as everyone looking objectively on the situation is concerned, Lisbeth is the criminal and SAPO are the good guys trying to protect the public from a criminally insane 23-year-old girl when in reality it's Lisbeth whose trying to see that justice is being done and SAPO are the one engaging in illegal activities.


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  #32  
Old April 27th, 2012, 4:22 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by Goddess_Clio View Post
Lisbeth never has the opportunity to turn anyone in to the "proper authorities" because she herself is a victim of them. She is the ongoing focus and priority of a high-ranking government organization whose aim is to actively cover up the indiscretions of a true criminal in order that their own questionably legal actions might remain undiscovered and she stepped right in the middle of that.

While it might have been the "right" thing for Lisbeth to turn people over to the "proper authorities," in her experience no good has ever come from dealing with them. They don't listen to her, they don't believe her when she tells them the truth, the conspiracy to defame her character by SAPO was so successful that even if she was completely in the right when she turns a criminal in to the police her personal history, her internment in a mental institution, her previous criminal record that includes assult and arrests would probably lead to herself being arrested, especially if SAPO got wind of what was going on. They would use any and every opportunity they could to get her locked up again.
As I've only read the first book all we see is that that is what she believes, with no evidence that it is fact.

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As far as everyone looking objectively on the situation is concerned, Lisbeth is the criminal and SAPO are the good guys trying to protect the public from a criminally insane 23-year-old girl
Maybe not criminally insane but certainly a sociopath, bordering on psychooath.

Quote:
when in reality it's Lisbeth whose trying to see that justice is being done and SAPO are the one engaging in illegal activities.
Let me see if I get this straight: violent sexual assault is justifiable in some instances?


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  #33  
Old April 27th, 2012, 4:54 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by Wab View Post
As I've only read the first book all we see is that that is what she believes, with no evidence that it is fact.
I'd suggest you read next two books as Lisbeth's character is much more developed in them and they deal almost exclusively on what made her who she is and why she reacts to situations the way she does.

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Maybe not criminally insane but certainly a sociopath, bordering on psychooath.
SAPO does attempt to personify her as criminally insane. As said above, you're missing a lot about her character if you're only basing it on the first book.

Quote:
Let me see if I get this straight: violent sexual assault is justifiable in some instances?
I'm not saying her assault against Bjurman was justifiable in terms of the real world but to her it was the only thing she could do to guarantee her independance from him. As said on page, I believe, who would have believed her had she gone to the authorities? The only time she would have had a case against him was the night it happened and it's very realistic that she would not have reported it. After that it was her word against his and he's an apparently upstanding lawyer just trying to help her while she's a girl who spent four years in a mental institution for, as far as is publically know, attempting to murder her father for no good reason and has a criminal record including drug related arrests, drunkenness and assault.

In terms of reality her assault was criminal retaliation and assult, I agree. In terms of fiction, her assault against Bjurman is poetic justice. The Millenium trilogy is fiction, not reality.

I really do suggest you read the next two books as judging Lisbeth on her actions in the first book is really short-sighted. You don't know her whole story.


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  #34  
Old August 24th, 2012, 5:10 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by Goddess_Clio View Post
I somewhat agree with the point made here.

Spoiler: show
Martin Vanger is a terrible person, certainly, but if you look at the protagonist in the story it's Blomkvist, not Harriet or Lisbeth or anyone else. Blomkvist is clearly the protagonist as the story cannot begin until he is given the task of finding out who killed Harriet and what happened to her. The antagonist in the book is the person who is working against the protagonist, who is attempting to thwart their desire to achieve their goal. To me there is a stronger case in saying that Wennerstrom is the antagonist as it's still questionable whether he planted the guy that gave Blomkvist the bad info that he went to press with and he has the most to lose if Blomkvist solves Harriet's murder and gets the dirt on him. He is a decidedly off-camera antagonist if this is the case.

I would even say that there is a case for saying Old Man Vanger, whose first name escapes me at the moment, is the antagonist as he knows that what he is offering Blomkvist is worthless to him and is only using that bait to hook Blomkvist into taking the job of working on Harriet's murder. But then they become allies for the middle three acts of the book so that kind of throws that out the window.

Martin Vanger isn't really the antagonist since he, like his uncle, wants to know what happened to Harriet and it's pure coincidence that his own murderous exploits are found out in the course of Blomkvist's investigation.
Spoiler: show
Precisely. I doubt Martin would have tried to hinder Blomkvist at all if his investigation hadn't taken him where it did. He was probably just as curious about what happened to Harriet a Henrik was.


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Originally Posted by Goddess_Clio View Post
It is for these reasons that I accept the slow pace of the first part of this book; it paints a more realistic picture and, after all, does perform some necessary functions like build the back story for the Harriet case and introduces us to some important characters. For as much as it drives me crazy I do admit that it shouldn't be cut.

The first part of book two, tho, could have been tossed. Even the movie (the swedish version) skipped over the first 150 pages of book two because they were worthless to the plot of that book.
Yeah, I guess I'm with you there. Those portions not have anything to do with the plot, but I'm not sure simply eliminating them is the solution either. We do learn a good bit about Lisbeth I think.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Goddess_Clio View Post
The first book is about the investigation of Harriet's murder, yes.

Spoiler: show
The second and third book are still investigative stories but they are all about Lisbeth.


In that respect, the first American title makes no sense; the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo? I was so angry at the end of that book that we never find out what her tattoo meant. I read the book thinking that her tattoo was really important to the plot since it's, you know, mentioned in the title of the book... but it's not. It's not even her most important tattoo in the series.
I'm telling you, someone here or in Britain read the book and thought a strong female protagonist would sell better than a book about a bunch of sociopaths. As for the second and third books though...

Spoiler: show
I agree that they're about Lisbeth, but mainly in the same way that a newspaper article is about someone. It was still, especially in the third book, Blomkvist pulling the majority of the strings and coming up with plans and evidence. Lisbeth was absent or immobilized for large portions of the third book, and if I recall in the second book she again took a back seat to Blomkvist's investigations of the Svenssen and Johanssen murders.

I'm not trying to denigrate Lisbeth's importance, because without her the books are rubbish, but I'm just thinking about this biographically in relation to the author. He was a journalist and author, and his protagonist, a good-looking ladies' man who loves sandwiches and cigarettes, just happens to be a journalist and author too. Blomkvist is in other words who the author would have liked to be: He always gets to the bottom of a story no matter what, he works to protect innocent people, especially women, and he makes the bad guys pay. For that reason I think the books are entirely a function of Blomkvist's journalistic efforts, and Lisbeth is just, you know, everything interesting.


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  #35  
Old September 27th, 2012, 8:17 am
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larssen

I read the trilogy and watched the US movie and the three Swedish ones. I thought they were all good. I like how in the US movie they changed the ending a bit (about Harriet not having gone to Australia, the way they did it was very clever.)

I loved the way they totally destroy that awful doctor - his name escapes me right now - at the trial. I read that part several times and reran the dvd to watch it a couple of times, it was so satisfying.

I agree that Blomkvist is the person Stieg Larssen would have liked to be.


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  #36  
Old September 27th, 2012, 8:20 am
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by Goddess_Clio View Post
I really do suggest you read the next two books as judging Lisbeth on her actions in the first book is really short-sighted. You don't know her whole story.
So what parts of her story justifies her being a violent sex offender?


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  #37  
Old September 27th, 2012, 4:48 pm
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by canismajoris View Post
Yeah, I guess I'm with you there. Those portions not have anything to do with the plot, but I'm not sure simply eliminating them is the solution either. We do learn a good bit about Lisbeth I think.
All we learn about Lisbeth in first 150 pages of book two is that she likes to drink alone in hotel bars, she okay seducing married men and underage boys, she's become obsessed with a mathematical problem (that's annoyingly never resolved; I can only assume this was a plot thread meant to be picked up in book 4 or beyond), and that she seems uncharacterisitcally helpful toward the hotel staff when there's a hurricane blowing in. None of these things were important to the rest of the plot of book two and none of them came into play during the course of book three. I absolutely think the events of her time jetsetting around the world could have been summed up in a chapter or less in the book.

Quote:
I'm telling you, someone here or in Britain read the book and thought a strong female protagonist would sell better than a book about a bunch of sociopaths.
In that respect, yes, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo is a more catchy title than Men Who Hate Women (the translated Swedish title, or something close to it).

Quote:
As for the second and third books though...

Spoiler: show
I agree that they're about Lisbeth, but mainly in the same way that a newspaper article is about someone. It was still, especially in the third book, Blomkvist pulling the majority of the strings and coming up with plans and evidence. Lisbeth was absent or immobilized for large portions of the third book, and if I recall in the second book she again took a back seat to Blomkvist's investigations of the Svenssen and Johanssen murders.

I'm not trying to denigrate Lisbeth's importance, because without her the books are rubbish, but I'm just thinking about this biographically in relation to the author. He was a journalist and author, and his protagonist, a good-looking ladies' man who loves sandwiches and cigarettes, just happens to be a journalist and author too. Blomkvist is in other words who the author would have liked to be: He always gets to the bottom of a story no matter what, he works to protect innocent people, especially women, and he makes the bad guys pay. For that reason I think the books are entirely a function of Blomkvist's journalistic efforts, and Lisbeth is just, you know, everything interesting.
No agrument there; the books belong to Blomkvist, he is the hero. But Lisbeth is the driving force behind the books. I disagree that she took a back seat to the Svenssen and Johanssen murders because she was right in the middle of the investigation. Not in person, but she was the prime suspect and it's her backstory that ends up being at the root of those murders. I also disagree that she takes a back seat in the third book because without her there is no plot in the third book. It's entirely about Blomkvist investigating her father and trying to prove that she was the focus of a government conspiracy to conceal the truth about the fact that her father's criminal actions were being hushed up. She was the hole that needed to be plugged before she sunk the whole ship. I think that she could have been written out of the story at times since I think her father's story was pretty strong on its own, but folding in the government conspiracy made the story that much more interesting. We all love a good conspiracy story and anything that proves that governments are corrupt in any small way is pretty satasfying to readers, IMO.

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Originally Posted by LyannaS View Post
I read the trilogy and watched the US movie and the three Swedish ones. I thought they were all good. I like how in the US movie they changed the ending a bit (about Harriet not having gone to Australia, the way they did it was very clever.)
I really liked that; I thought the whole Australia storyline was unnecessary. Having Harriet hide out in London was a nice twist, kind of a hiding in plain sight thing.

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I loved the way they totally destroy that awful doctor - his name escapes me right now - at the trial. I read that part several times and reran the dvd to watch it a couple of times, it was so satisfying.
I loved that part of the book. I wanted a lot more of Lisbeth's trial than we got because I wanted to see that doctor get totally creamed.

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Originally Posted by Wab View Post
So what parts of her story justifies her being a violent sex offender?
Please read my previous post, the comments in [brackets] I have added in this post:

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Originally Posted by Goddess_Clio View Post
I'm not saying her assault against Bjurman was justifiable in terms of the real world but to her [after learning about her backstory in books 2 and 3 and the crimes committed against her] it was the only thing she [felt she] could do to guarantee her independance from him. As said on page, I believe, who would have believed her had she gone to the authorities? [They (SAPO) had laid the groundwork for her being untrustworthy, a liar, insane, unstable, etc. They turned her into a victim who wouldn't have been believed even when she told the truth.] The only time she would have had a case against him was the night it happened and it's very realistic that she would not have reported it. [Not only do assault victims often not report their assaults, Lisbeth herself has a justifiable mistrust of authorities herself; she spent her childhood trying to convince someone, anyone, that her father was beating her mother (to the point where she was hospitalized and suffered sever brain damage) but they completely ignored her and then locked her up in a mental institution for trying to tell the truth. Her experience is that no authority figure, be it the police or the government, is willing to help her or believe her in any way so she has to take things into her own hands, and even when she does that she's punished.] After that it was her word against his [Bjurman's] and he's an apparently upstanding lawyer just trying to help her while she's a girl who spent four years in a mental institution for, as far as is publically know, attempting to murder her father for no good reason [when in reality she had a very good, noble reason] and has a criminal record including drug related arrests, drunkenness and assault.

In terms of reality her assault [on Bjurman] was criminal retaliation and assult, I agree. In terms of fiction, her assault against Bjurman is poetic justice. The Millenium trilogy is fiction, not reality.
I'm not denying that Lisbeth is a very troubled, mixed up person, but unless you know why she refuses to go to the police, why she mistrusts authority figures, why she feels like she has to dispense her own justice on the world (all of which are points revealed in books 2 and 3) than it's not even worth discussing her violent tendancies and whether or not she is justified in those actions.


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Old October 13th, 2012, 5:00 am
LyannaS  Female.gif LyannaS is offline
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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So what parts of her story justifies her being a violent sex offender?
She was the victim of violent sexual abuse herself. What she did to Bjurman is nothing compared to what he did to her, and what Teleborian did to her when she was totally helpless and under their control. What THEY did is inexcusable. She was hitting back in kind. She had learned that it was no use going to the authorities, they never believed her, and then she found herself in worse circumstances than before. So she had to mete out her own kind of justice.

I actually find her revenge on Bjurman and Teleborian very satisfying. Serves those awful men right.


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Old October 13th, 2012, 8:41 am
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by LyannaS View Post
She was the victim of violent sexual abuse herself.
So you agree that sexual assault is okay in certain circumstances.

Of course, these events are shown only from her perspective and given that she is the very definition of a sociopath, her viewpoint is very suspect.


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Old October 13th, 2012, 4:31 pm
Goddess_Clio  Female.gif Goddess_Clio is offline
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Re: The Millenium Trilogy - Stieg Larsson

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Originally Posted by Wab View Post
So you agree that sexual assault is okay in certain circumstances.
Without speaking for LyannaS, I'd say that I'd agree that Lisbeth thought that it was okay under her circumstances. Had she gone to the authorities it would have been her word against Bjurman's and she's the one with the criminal record and the history of being institutionalized for mental instability, not him.

In real life I, personally, say going to the authorities rather than seeking vengeance by giving what you got is not the way to go. Bjurman's assault on Lisbeth was so totally brutal that I find it hard to believe that any person in a position of authority would believe that it was anything other than a sexual assault. In the Millenium Trilogy, though, it's not that simple for Lisbeth. If she had gone to the authorities all that whole have happened was that she'd go back on SAPO's radar and they'd swoop in and hush the whole incident up or spin it so she's the bad guy so that the illegal arrangement set up to protect Zalanchenko doesn't collapse and SAPO arent' exposed to an investigation themselves.

In terms of the information revealed in books 2 and 3 regarding Lisbeth's backstory, Lisbeth's action against Bjurman was the only action she could have taken. That's why I accept her assault on Bjurman even though I don't agree that that would have been the right action to take if this had happened in the real world rather than a fictional one. It was the only action for her that would guarantee Bjurman would no longer be a part of her life.


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Last edited by Goddess_Clio; November 26th, 2012 at 4:36 pm.
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