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  #1001  
Old November 29th, 2009, 9:15 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Thanks - melaszka's right - that's what we call a pinafore dress

Thaks


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  #1002  
Old November 30th, 2009, 1:08 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

So, a jumper is a sweater, and, what we refer to as a jumper is a "pinafore dress." I always heard a "pinafore" referred to as a dress without sleeves and a scooped neckline, similar to what we think of as a jumper, but "frillier." Usually a pinafore was made of cotton, gingham, or a light material, with ruffles and lace accenting the garment. Jumpers are made of wool or corduroy, heavier materials, and are usually plain. There might be a scallop neckline, or embroidery to accent the neck, but, for the most part, they are just an "overdress" to wear with a blouse or light sweater.

This thread sure is named correctly.


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  #1003  
Old November 30th, 2009, 4:22 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Ew. Pinafores. I had to wear it during primary school. (or grade school)


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  #1004  
Old November 30th, 2009, 6:35 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

And just to add to the confusion, a pinafore (pinny) for someone of my (advanced) age in the UK would have been an item of clothing tied round the waist to stop getting messy when cooking. Often the first thing made in junior school - your own gingham pinny decorated with cross stitch. Green and white in my case to go with the red hair


  #1005  
Old November 30th, 2009, 10:02 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Sounds like an apron. :/


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  #1006  
Old November 30th, 2009, 10:23 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

For me, a pinny covers more than an apron and usually has arm holes. Something that only covers you from the waist down, or covers only your front, with a halter neck and waist tie, is an apron.


  #1007  
Old November 30th, 2009, 11:18 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Yup, apron now - pinafore in 1958


  #1008  
Old November 30th, 2009, 11:33 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Isn't it weird that so many things can be called by the same name, and one thing can be called by so many names?

Aprons are usually a garment that ties around the waist and covers one either from the waist down, or can have a strap or top that goes around the neck as well. They can be plain or frilly, and usually have a pocket or two. Then you have a smock, with covers pretty much whatever you're wearing.
This is usually a loose-fitting garmet that buttons up the front. It's often used by painters.


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  #1009  
Old December 15th, 2009, 2:37 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Is coke known as soda or something? Sometimes people refer to coke as soda.


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  #1010  
Old December 15th, 2009, 3:28 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by MC2456 View Post
Is coke known as soda or something? Sometimes people refer to coke as soda.
There's coke, soda, and pop, depending on where you grew up. I'm from BC and I've always known it as "pop".


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  #1011  
Old December 15th, 2009, 12:55 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by MC2456 View Post
Is coke known as soda or something? Sometimes people refer to coke as soda.
I only call it "coke" if the brand name is Coca-Cola.

In Southern California, it's called "soda". In Iowa, it's called "pop".
...and I think someone posted earlier that in Australia, they just call it a "soft drink" (but don't quote me on that).


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Old December 15th, 2009, 1:16 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by Pox Voldius View Post
I think someone posted earlier that in Australia, they just call it a "soft drink" (but don't quote me on that).
Yes, aside from actual brand names, many people here just call them "soft drinks" or "fizzy drinks."


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  #1013  
Old January 19th, 2010, 6:58 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

We may have discussed this before, but I don't remember the outcome of the discussion. Does anyone know why, in the US, they call a woman's handbag a "pocketbook"? It looks like neither a pocket nor a book.

Besides, there is a brand name of paperbacks called "Pocket Books" - and in French, a "livre de poche" is a paperback.

It drives me crazy when my husband tells me he put something "on your bureau, next to your pocketbook."

To me, a "bureau" is a desk or an office, not a chest of drawers or dresser. And a handbag is a purse.

Come to think of it, we had a discussion about "purse" too, didn't we? For some it's just a small bag where you keep your change (as in "change purse") for other, it's a bigger handbag which may contain a purse.

And then there's "commode" - It took me some time to realize that in the US it meant the kitty litter. In French, a "commode" is a chest of drawers. I forget whether it has yet another meaning in British English?


  #1014  
Old January 19th, 2010, 7:16 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

In British English a bureau is a desk - usually quite a fancy one like like this


This is a commode


Though there are fancier ones where the function is less explicit. And a purse is always a small container for money (that a woman would keep in her handbag)


  #1015  
Old January 19th, 2010, 11:02 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

... and sometimes men will keep their change in a purse in their shoulder bag ...


  #1016  
Old January 19th, 2010, 12:51 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by FleurduJardin View Post
We may have discussed this before, but I don't remember the outcome of the discussion. Does anyone know why, in the US, they call a woman's handbag a "pocketbook"? It looks like neither a pocket nor a book.
I think the "pocketbook" thing is regional to the Northeast; New York & New England and thereabouts.

I've never heard anyone in Iowa, Wisconsin, or California, call a purse a "pocketbook". For some reason, I keep thinking of a checkbook or a wallet in the rare instances that I hear someone say "pocketbook".


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Old January 19th, 2010, 1:04 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by ginger1 View Post
... and sometimes men will keep their change in a purse in their shoulder bag ...
I am suspicious of men who keep their money in purses


  #1018  
Old January 19th, 2010, 10:45 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by Mundungus Fletc View Post
I am suspicious of men who keep their money in purses
Aw please Dung!

Funny, I learned English in the UK - England, actually, I never went to either Scotland or Wales, and my experience of Ireland is a couple of hours' stopover during a transatlantic flight - but I never saw a British "commode" or heard the word over there.

But even after I came to the USA, I was still talking about the "boot" and "bonnet" of a car, "lorries" for trucks and I still pronounce the vowel "o" as a diphtongue ("aw").

If "pocketbook" is typical of the North-East and New England (though I've heard it in the Midwest too), no wonder my husband, who's Connecticut born-and-bred, almost always refers to my handbags as "pocketbooks". As I mentioned before, it drives me nuts, as much as his calling my chest of drawers a "bureau". Thanks, Dung, for letting me know that that word has the same meaning as in French, though in French, an elaborate desk like the one you show would be call a "secrétaire".


  #1019  
Old January 19th, 2010, 11:23 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pox Voldius View Post
I think the "pocketbook" thing is regional to the Northeast; New York & New England and thereabouts.

I've never heard anyone in Iowa, Wisconsin, or California, call a purse a "pocketbook". For some reason, I keep thinking of a checkbook or a wallet in the rare instances that I hear someone say "pocketbook".
Older people say it in the Southeast as well


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  #1020  
Old January 20th, 2010, 7:09 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by FleurduJardin View Post
Thanks, Dung, for letting me know that that word has the same meaning as in French, though in French, an elaborate desk like the one you show would be call a "secrétaire".
I am sure antique dealers would use the French word (nothing like using foreign words to show how clever you are) Bureau is never used for office here - it has rather sinister connotations of unmarked buildings occupied by les flics


 
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