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How Do You Discover New Music?



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  #41  
Old October 2nd, 2009, 4:48 pm
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

Listening to the radio and fanmade videos on You Tube
Well, when You Tube allows music in fanmade videos


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  #42  
Old November 8th, 2009, 2:09 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

I use Last.fm, which I would recommend to anyone interested in finding new music, as well as finding like-minded people. Last.fm is a website that tracks what you listen to on your computer and mp3 player, then gives you suggestions for new bands and other users with similar taste. It's really fantastic.


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  #43  
Old November 11th, 2009, 10:06 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

I usually listen to music I like on youtube. Then on the related videos I will click them and check the band out.

Or, I just type into goole "Black metal bands" or whatever type of genre band I am trying to find. I get the name and check them out.

....rarely is it by word of mouth.


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  #44  
Old November 11th, 2009, 10:33 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

Last.fm can be pretty useful if you look in the 'similar artists' part, though sometime they're totally off.

All the bands I've discovered recently have been side/old bands from musicians I like. I'm a big fan of all of Jeordie White's music (Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson, A Perfect Circle) and because I follow what he's doing, a few months ago I realised he had a sideband (Goon Moon) which I'm now quite in love with. Seems most musicians I like have some kind of second band these days.

Also a lot of the bands I like are signed to Nuclear Blast (record label) and I've discovered a few new bands by looking at their YouTube account. Not sure that'd work for most labels (Interscope etc) because they're a bit too broad, but for some it certainly would.


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  #45  
Old November 11th, 2009, 10:49 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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Originally Posted by Hysteria View Post
Last.fm can be pretty useful if you look in the 'similar artists' part, though sometime they're totally off.
Spotify also suggests "similar artists" and Amazon sometimes makes useful recommendations based on what you've already bought/browsed. It can be great if you like stuff popular enough to generate enough useful data or have taste which fits comfortably within typical generic boundaries.

The problem with all of these, though, is that if you like an obscure band that only about 3 other people like (e.g. Furniture), the "similar artists" will just be a list of what those 3 people like, even if it's nothing like the one band you have in common.

Quote:
All the bands I've discovered recently have been side/old bands from musicians I like. I'm a big fan of all of Jeordie White's music (Nine Inch Nails, Marilyn Manson, A Perfect Circle) and because I follow what he's doing, a few months ago I realised he had a sideband (Goon Moon) which I'm now quite in love with. Seems most musicians I like have some kind of second band these days.
Yes, I increasingly find myself playing that kind of musical treasure hunt these days. Or they guest on/produce another band/artist's work, and I check that out.

I often find that the same artist's name eerily keeps cropping up in connection with different artists I like, even if they're very different genres (e.g. I decided it might be a good idea to check out Joan As Police Woman when, within the space of a few days, I read that David Sylvian, who I really like, had guested on her last album and Rachel Unthank , who I also really like, and Joan are big mutual fans. Inevitably, I really liked her stuff)


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  #46  
Old November 11th, 2009, 11:15 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
Spotify also suggests "similar artists" and Amazon sometimes makes useful recommendations based on what you've already bought/browsed. It can be great if you like stuff popular enough to generate enough useful data or have taste which fits comfortably within typical generic boundaries.
Yep, I have that problem. I don't know what genre a lot of my music fits into so I can't just search a genre, and even still, I like a couple of alternative rock bands but find a large majority to be quite dull and wouldn't listen to them. Of course, that could just be me being picky.

Quote:
The problem with all of these, though, is that if you like an obscure band that only about 3 other people like (e.g. Furniture), the "similar artists" will just be a list of what those 3 people like, even if it's nothing like the one band you have in common.
I find this on Last.fm even with more popular bands. I just clicked on my 'top 6 most listened to bands' to look at 'similar artists' and every so often I found one that fit but then most I just thought 'what the?' like Marilyn Manson and Nine Inch Nails (they sound nothing alike but share many common fans), A Perfect Circle and Tool (both bands have the same singer but I wouldn't say they sound the same at all), Deathstars and Dope Stars Inc (both 'gothic' bands but their music isn't similar at all)... seems a bit lazy to me, and very unhelpful. I think this has a lot to do with the difficulty in defining many bands, however.


I can't even remember how I came across most of the more obscure bands I like Probably just more sidebands.


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  #47  
Old November 11th, 2009, 5:20 pm
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

MTV or radio.


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  #48  
Old November 11th, 2009, 8:19 pm
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

I generally find new music through recs from people I actually know. If someone thinks I'll like something, I'll give it a try, and occasionally if I'm reading a fic and there is a recommended song to go with it I might give it a try. I've actually found several songs I like that way.


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  #49  
Old November 11th, 2009, 11:16 pm
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

AOL Radio, Youtube, and forums.

AOL Radio has great stations that play a vast variety of artists. I hear something new everyday.

I search through the related videos on youtube vids I like to see if there's something I haven't heard yet.


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  #50  
Old November 18th, 2009, 1:17 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hysteria View Post
Yep, I have that problem. I don't know what genre a lot of my music fits into so I can't just search a genre, and even still, I like a couple of alternative rock bands but find a large majority to be quite dull and wouldn't listen to them. Of course, that could just be me being picky.
No, I don't think so! (Or, at least, if you are picky, it's in a good sense). I also find that the artists I really like have a special something I can't describe and that most of the other artists working in the same genre just do nothing for me.

Another thing I find is that the more people are into a genre, the more discriminating they are and the more specific their requirements. I've got a friend who, like me, is very into New Folk (in fact, she was the one who converted me) and we have more arguments about folk artists than we do about genres we like less - she can't see what I see in Eliza Carthy, I can't see what she sees in Seth Lakeman, and yet to someone who doesn't know the genre, their music probably sounds pretty much the same.

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I find this on Last.fm even with more popular bands. I just clicked on my 'top 6 most listened to bands' to look at 'similar artists' and every so often I found one that fit but then most I just thought 'what the?' like Marilyn Manson and Nine Inch Nails (they sound nothing alike but share many common fans), A Perfect Circle and Tool (both bands have the same singer but I wouldn't say they sound the same at all), Deathstars and Dope Stars Inc (both 'gothic' bands but their music isn't similar at all)... seems a bit lazy to me, and very unhelpful. I think this has a lot to do with the difficulty in defining many bands, however.
Most of my Last.fm recommendations seem to fall into one of two categories: the Bleeding Obvious or the Utterly Bizarre!

I don't know that it's necessarily a problem of bands being difficult to define. I don't imagine there is a real human being thinking up these recommendations - I imagine they are computer-generated, based on the number of common fans.


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  #51  
Old November 19th, 2009, 10:33 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

Yeah, the last.fm methods of finding recommendations doesn't work all that well. For example Depeche Mode are very diverse - very. They've covered pretty much every popular genre. But almost all the artists last.fm lists as similar to them are the ones belonging to their eraliest niche - New Romantic and synthpop, and I'm not all that keen on those.

Also, I listen to a lot of jazz, but I'm kind of picky when it comes to that. Last.fm has no idea though and keeps recommending Frank Sinatra, who is nothing like Ella Fitzgerald or Chet Baker.


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  #52  
Old November 23rd, 2009, 12:36 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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Yeah, the last.fm methods of finding recommendations doesn't work all that well. For example Depeche Mode are very diverse - very. They've covered pretty much every popular genre. But almost all the artists last.fm lists as similar to them are the ones belonging to their eraliest niche - New Romantic and synthpop, and I'm not all that keen on those.
I've found that a lot of bands that emerged in the 80s and happened to use synths to some extent or another seem to get lumped together, even if they have little else in common.

And, yes, the fact that a band's style evolved over the years is rarely acknowledged in the recommendations.

As an aside, I would never have called Depeche Mode "New Romantic", even in their early days. There have been many arguments about what exactly that term means or whether "New Romantic music" existed at all, other than in the minds of marketing people, but to me, "New Romantic" bands were those who mixed the new synth technology with traditional guitar-based pop and tended to wear scarves, frilly shirts, pirate costumes and that kind of flamboyant, theatrical stuff. People like early Depeche Mode, who relied almost entirely on synths, and who dressed in black, were "futurists".


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  #53  
Old November 23rd, 2009, 10:54 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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As an aside, I would never have called Depeche Mode "New Romantic", even in their early days. There have been many arguments about what exactly that term means or whether "New Romantic music" existed at all, other than in the minds of marketing people, but to me, "New Romantic" bands were those who mixed the new synth technology with traditional guitar-based pop and tended to wear scarves, frilly shirts, pirate costumes and that kind of flamboyant, theatrical stuff. People like early Depeche Mode, who relied almost entirely on synths, and who dressed in black, were "futurists".
I must admit I know little about this genre. I have just read about DM referred to as New Romantic when they first emerged. I know the band itself disagreed.


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  #54  
Old November 26th, 2009, 4:32 pm
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

Am I weird and/or should just get out more, or does anyone else ever get a bit overwhelmed and intimidated by the sheer volume of music that is out there?

Some days I get really excited about discovering new music, but then there are days when there just don't seem enough hours in the day to properly listen to the artists I already know I love. And then there are days when I worry I could like absolutely anything if I listened to it enough times and with an open enough mind, and then i get scared, as I just don't have enough time/money to like everything!

For many years I got into the bad habit that I think a lot of over-25s get into, of stopping listening to any new music apart from new releases by a handful of bands I've liked since I was about 18. For the last 3 or so years, I've been really trying to get out of this habit, but sometimes I hardly know where to start with discovering new music or what to prioritise.

Should I concentrate on a couple of genres I like, or is that too narrow?

Should I prioritise playing catch-up with huge, seminal bands of the 90s and 00s, that everyone has heard of, where it's really embarrassing admitting I've never heard any of their songs, even though they might be bands I wouldn't particularly like?

If I do find a band I like, is it the best use of my time and resources to devour everything that band has done, their members' previous and/or side bands, and bands that are generally considered similar to that band, or would I be better off holding back, just listening to a bit of their stuff, and moving on to other stuff, in case there are a dozen bands out there I might like even more once I discovered them?

How many times do I have to listen to an album/song before I can definitely decide it's not for me (given that some things are very slow growers, and you can throw out a lot of good music if you listen to it once online and immediately reject it)?

Does anyone else wrestle with these questions, or do I just think too much?


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Old November 26th, 2009, 5:07 pm
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
Am I weird and/or should just get out more, or does anyone else ever get a bit overwhelmed and intimidated by the sheer volume of music that is out there?
Oh I feel like that sometimes too. Recently I went on a hunt to find some new music and must have listened to dozens of different bands in only a couple of days. What worried me the most is that Last.fm told me I'd love them all and my ears bled at all but two

Quote:
Some days I get really excited about discovering new music, but then there are days when there just don't seem enough hours in the day to properly listen to the artists I already know I love. And then there are days when I worry I could like absolutely anything if I listened to it enough times and with an open enough mind, and then i get scared, as I just don't have enough time/money to like everything!
You make it sound so dramatic! I know what you mean though.I've often thought that if I tried, I could expand my musical horizons, but quite frankly I don't want to or feel the need to.

Quote:
For many years I got into the bad habit that I think a lot of over-25s get into, of stopping listening to any new music apart from new releases by a handful of bands I've liked since I was about 18. For the last 3 or so years, I've been really trying to get out of this habit, but sometimes I hardly know where to start with discovering new music or what to prioritise.
My (50 year old) mother is like that. The only way she'll listen to new music is if it's by a band she's always liked or if I force her to. But for her it's not so much that she doesn't want to listen to new music, it's that she doesn't know where to look which I think is true of, not so much over 25s but probably many over 40s.

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Should I concentrate on a couple of genres I like, or is that too narrow?
Should I prioritise playing catch-up with huge, seminal bands of the 90s and 00s, that everyone has heard of, where it's really embarrassing admitting I've never heard any of their songs, even though they might be bands I wouldn't particularly like?
I don't think that's narrow, and I'm not familiar with any popular songs from the 00s unless they're ones you just couldn't escape (eg. JT's Sexy Back). I went clubbing with some friends on Halloween and I didn't recognise any of the songs until they played some terrible boybands from the 90s which I of course knew, having grown up in the 90s. I coudn't name a single top 40 hit from the past year though and would struggle with many at all from the '00s I don't think it's a bad thing just listening to a few of your favourite genres. I think most people do it to an extent. You know what you like, why waste your time elsewhere unless someone has suggested you might like it?

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If I do find a band I like, is it the best use of my time and resources to devour everything that band has done, their members' previous and/or side bands, and bands that are generally considered similar to that band, or would I be better off holding back, just listening to a bit of their stuff, and moving on to other stuff, in case there are a dozen bands out there I might like even more once I discovered them?
Well... that's what I do! Of say, my top three favourite bands, most of the members have side bands or have been in other bands so I checked out all of those and discovered almost a dozen new bands I liked. I think that's a very effective way of finding new music. I haven't had much success with finding bands 'similar' to artists I like, probably because I'm so fussy but that'd make sense as a reasonable place to start (for most people).
I'd definently recommend listening to old albums by bands you like though. I didn't start doing this until a couple of years ago and wow was I missing out!

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How many times do I have to listen to an album/song before I can definitely decide it's not for me (given that some things are very slow growers, and you can throw out a lot of good music if you listen to it once online and immediately reject it)?
I think this depends on how much you want to like it, to an extent. For example, when one of my favourite bands releases an album I'll go out and buy it. Often I'll dislike it on the first few listens but after a while it grows on me. If it's a song from an artist/genre I generaly dislike I can usually tell within one or two listens if it's not going to mesh. Of course everyone is different but I think it really does come down to how much you want to like it.

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Does anyone else wrestle with these questions, or do I just think too much?
If you do, looks like I do too!


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  #56  
Old November 27th, 2009, 12:56 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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Originally Posted by Hysteria View Post
Oh I feel like that sometimes too. Recently I went on a hunt to find some new music and must have listened to dozens of different bands in only a couple of days. What worried me the most is that Last.fm told me I'd love them all and my ears bled at all but two
You should see some of the stuff it tries to palm me off with.

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My (50 year old) mother is like that. The only way she'll listen to new music is if it's by a band she's always liked or if I force her to. But for her it's not so much that she doesn't want to listen to new music, it's that she doesn't know where to look which I think is true of, not so much over 25s but probably many over 40s.
The internet has been fantastic for that. It's hard to comprehend how people found about about new music in the days when all we had to go on was network radio and word of mouth.

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I don't think that's narrow, and I'm not familiar with any popular songs from the 00s unless they're ones you just couldn't escape (eg. JT's Sexy Back). I went clubbing with some friends on Halloween and I didn't recognise any of the songs until they played some terrible boybands from the 90s which I of course knew, having grown up in the 90s. I coudn't name a single top 40 hit from the past year though and would struggle with many at all from the '00s
Well, I was thinking more Oasis and Franz Ferdinand than NSync and the Pussycat Dolls, but I think they can wait.

Part of me has a kamikaze urge to bone up on every genre under the sun, even the ones I hate, just so I can wipe the supercilious smirk off the face of those muso bores who always annoy me at parties by treating me like I can't possibly know anything about music because I'm a girl. But, essentially, life's too short.

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Well... that's what I do! Of say, my top three favourite bands, most of the members have side bands or have been in other bands so I checked out all of those and discovered almost a dozen new bands I liked.
I do that a lot, too, and it's great, but I'm a bit paranoid these guys will see my last.fm profile and think I'm an obsessive stalker!

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I think this depends on how much you want to like it, to an extent. For example, when one of my favourite bands releases an album I'll go out and buy it. Often I'll dislike it on the first few listens but after a while it grows on me.
Yes, that's the same with me. It doesn't always work - sometimes I still don't like it - but I'm usually prepared to give them the benefit of the doubt and listen to it 10-20 times before I admit defeat. Whereas if I'm listening to a band I don't know on the internet, I tend to reject it after one or two listens if it's not doing it for me. It's not just wanting to like albums by people I like, it's a question of trust - if I know someone is a brilliant musician whose taste usually matches mine, if I don't get it immediately, I'll assume there's something I must have missed, because I know they're not talentless and I trust their taste more than my own.

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If it's a song from an artist/genre I generaly dislike I can usually tell within one or two listens if it's not going to mesh
For me, it depends on the genre/type of arrangements. Very melody-dependent music, like a lot of mainstream pop, rock and traditional folk, I either like it or I don't. Stuff that's more dependent on rhythm and/or texture than melody can take me a lot longer, but if it grows on me, it really grows on me.


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Old November 27th, 2009, 6:58 am
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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You should see some of the stuff it tries to palm me off with.
I've seriously beein insulted by some of Last.fm's suggestions If it were a person I'd have a few words...

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The internet has been fantastic for that. It's hard to comprehend how people found about about new music in the days when all we had to go on was network radio and word of mouth.
Oh yes we're very fortunate. My (51 year old) father cannot understand how I can know so many bands the only ones he listens to broke up well before I was born, or my music which he often has no choice to listen to lol. It wouldn't even occur to people like my parents to use something like Last.fm or YouTube to find new music. But also I think it's not as high on their priority list as it probably is for younger people.


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Well, I was thinking more Oasis and Franz Ferdinand than NSync and the Pussycat Dolls, but I think they can wait.
Haha well, I'm a bit ashamed to say I'd probably recognise more of the latter, but not by choice.

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I do that a lot, too, and it's great, but I'm a bit paranoid these guys will see my last.fm profile and think I'm an obsessive stalker!
Well, whenever I list my top 4 bands online, ANYWHERE they're always the same. All four bands had, at one point, one common musician. If he ever happens to stumble on my Last.fm, Facebook, DeviantART (I draw those bands quite a lot) etc he'll take out a restraining order.
It makes sense to look into side/old bands though. I mean, if they have common musicians chances are you wont mind them (or in my case become way too obsessive :rolleyes).


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Yes, that's the same with me. It doesn't always work - sometimes I still don't like it - but I'm usually prepared to give them the benefit of the doubt and listen to it 10-20 times before I admit defeat.
Yeah same. If it's one of my favourite artists I will really try and like it and 99% of the time it pays off and I end up loving it. Although, one of my favourite bands used to be Muse, but afther their past two releases I can no longer listen to them. I tried so hard to like them, but no. Cant always win I guess.

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Whereas if I'm listening to a band I don't know on the internet, I tend to reject it after one or two listens if it's not doing it for me. It's not just wanting to like albums by people I like, it's a question of trust - if I know someone is a brilliant musician whose taste usually matches mine, if I don't get it immediately, I'll assume there's something I must have missed, because I know they're not talentless and I trust their taste more than my own.
Very well said and I agree. You're more generous than I am, if I'm listening to a new band I'll generally listen to the first 30 seconds of half a dozen songs and if that doesn't catch me, I don't go back


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  #58  
Old November 27th, 2009, 1:02 pm
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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Originally Posted by Hysteria View Post
It wouldn't even occur to people like my parents to use something like Last.fm or YouTube to find new music.
Yes, the day I realised I was probably having a mid-life crisis was when my 16-year-old niece asked my advice about how to get a Spotify account, instead of vice versa!

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But also I think it's not as high on their priority list as it probably is for younger people.
I've really only got back into music since I moved out of London and started working from home, so have had more time at my disposal. For people with busy jobs, families etc, music inevitably slides further down the list.

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Well, whenever I list my top 4 bands online, ANYWHERE they're always the same. All four bands had, at one point, one common musician. If he ever happens to stumble on my Last.fm, Facebook, DeviantART (I draw those bands quite a lot) etc he'll take out a restraining order.
You're probably all right - I'm assuming that all four bands are vaguely similar genres, right? So liking them all is pretty natural.

Whereas one of my favourite musicians has, in the course of a varied career, fronted a punk band, played slightly Johnny Marresque guitar in an 80s indie band, played keyboards and done mixing and programming for a band that plays electronically-programmed dance music, and has also accidentally picked up a Heavy Metal Grammy and a BBC Folk Award somewhere along the line for contributions he's made to albums by his friends. Having more than 2 of his bands in my top 6 does, inescapably, suggest that I just have a really weird fixation with him.

Another potentially fruitful (but in actuality somewhat hit-and-miss) source of bands that are new to me is exploring my favourite artists' influences. I'm often surprised by how many of the artists I like, even though they are very different from each other, cite the same people as influences (I often feel quite relieved at this - it makes my choices of favourites seem far less random and arbitrary. There is obviously a common link in there somewhere that draws me to these people). The two names that keep cropping up again and again when the bands I like discuss their own idols are Scott Walker and Can. I haven't explored Can yet, but can't say I've been that excited by Scott Walker. Maybe I just haven't heard enough yet, or maybe you had to live through that era to get it.



Last edited by Melaszka; November 27th, 2009 at 1:18 pm.
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  #59  
Old November 27th, 2009, 1:39 pm
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Hysteria  Undisclosed.gif Hysteria is offline
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
I've really only got back into music since I moved out of London and started working from home, so have had more time at my disposal. For people with busy jobs, families etc, music inevitably slides further down the list.
I hadn't thought of that. Younger people have more opportunity to listen to music. I usually listen to music in the car, constantly when I'm at home, when I'm at uni (obviously not in lectures )... pretty much any time I'm not talking to someone. Once I start working 9-5 this will, of course, change.

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You're probably all right - I'm assuming that all four bands are vaguely similar genres, right? So liking them all is pretty natural.
Well kinda. They're all rock but one's industrial, one kinda traditional heavy rock, one gothic/punk and one alternative so they do vary somewhat.
I think something else about checking out a musician's side/old bands is hearing a different side of them. Recently I checked out the new sideband of a musician I like who used to be in one of my favourite band. He was the guitarist and as a solo artist he plays guitar. No singing or even bass I Think. Just guitar and drums. But before I listened to his solo project I had no idea what an astoundingly talented guitarist he was! I knew he was good, but not that good. Also I think a lot of musicians use sidebands to try out new things including differnet genres so it can give you a different perspective on genres in that sense.

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Whereas one of my favourite musicians has, in the course of a varied career, fronted a punk band, played slightly Johnny Marresque guitar in an 80s indie band, played keyboards and done mixing and programming for a band that plays electronically-programmed dance music, and has also accidentally picked up a Heavy Metal Grammy and a BBC Folk Award somewhere along the line for contributions he's made to albums by his friends. Having more than 2 of his bands in my top 6 does, inescapably, suggest that I just have a really weird fixation with him.
No, I don't think so. Like I said above, my favourite musician is in all of my top four bands and each of them sound completely different. I think it's just that we see that a musician we like is in X-band and then we check them out when we may not have if that person wasn't part of it. My second favourite musician is/has been in 3 of my top 6 favourites. There's no chance I would have checked out his solo project if I didn't already like his work in other bands. I think it's just clever music-scouting

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Another potentially fruitful (but in actuality somewhat hit-and-miss) source of bands that are new to me is exploring my favourite artists' influences.
I agree this is very much hit and miss. I haven't had much success with it but can see why it could potentially be a good place to start. I think, though, that most bands don't actually sound like their inspiration, they just get ideas from them. But that's just speculation.


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Old November 27th, 2009, 9:16 pm
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Melaszka  Female.gif Melaszka is offline
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Re: How Do You Discover New Music?

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Originally Posted by Hysteria View Post
I hadn't thought of that. Younger people have more opportunity to listen to music. I usually listen to music in the car, constantly when I'm at home, when I'm at uni (obviously not in lectures )... pretty much any time I'm not talking to someone. Once I start working 9-5 this will, of course, change.
Well, not necessarily - some people who are really passionate about music still seem to find time for it, whatever their age and responsibilities, which is fantastic. It has really shocked me, though, that my sister, who used to be completely obsessed with classic and prog rock and was a talented and enthusiastic guitarist, just seems to have let music go completely since she got married. Hasn't picked up a guitar in years and hardly ever listens to any music except classical.

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I think something else about checking out a musician's side/old bands is hearing a different side of them. Recently I checked out the new sideband of a musician I like who used to be in one of my favourite band. He was the guitarist and as a solo artist he plays guitar. No singing or even bass I Think. Just guitar and drums. But before I listened to his solo project I had no idea what an astoundingly talented guitarist he was! I knew he was good, but not that good.
Yes - and I think changes in power balance in sidebands can often make a big difference e.g. if the band member who has had most of the creative control over the main band takes more of a back seat and lets one of the others take more of the decisions/do more of the writing, it can make for a whole different sound.

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Also I think a lot of musicians use sidebands to try out new things including differnet genres so it can give you a different perspective on genres in that sense.
Definitely - it's led me into genres I wouldn't previously have touched with a bargepole and really blown my mind wide open.

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No, I don't think so. Like I said above, my favourite musician is in all of my top four bands and each of them sound completely different. I think it's just that we see that a musician we like is in X-band and then we check them out when we may not have if that person wasn't part of it. My second favourite musician is/has been in 3 of my top 6 favourites. There's no chance I would have checked out his solo project if I didn't already like his work in other bands. I think it's just clever music-scouting
Thanks - you're making me feel much less like a creepy stalker!

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I think, though, that most bands don't actually sound like their inspiration, they just get ideas from them.
True. And if they do actually sound a lot like their inspiration, it's usually a bad thing (e.g. I used to like Simply Red until I heard some of the soul and funk bands that inspired them and realised SR were just a watered down, pale imitation of their idols).

Thinking about it, I think the Scott Walker influence is probably there more in vocal style than songwriting or musical content. It's only very recently that it struck me that many of my favourite male vocalists sing in a very natural-sounding, deep, chocolatey baritone, like Walker, and that it is much more common in rock and pop for male singers to force themselves into the tenor or falsetto range, regardless of their natural pitch. I had honestly never noticed that before.


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