Login  
 
 
Go Back   Chamber of Secrets > Diagon Alley > In Cinemas & General Movie discussion

Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #81  
Old February 19th, 2010, 11:56 pm
LewsTherin's Avatar
LewsTherin  Male.gif LewsTherin is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 5913 days
Location: Pretoria, South Africa
Age: 36
Posts: 1,055
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

Matt Damon did a very good South African accent in Invictus. At times it sounded perfect, going over-the-top only with the 'Okes' bits. Mind you, there were a lot of real South Africans in there, so he had to do it well to fit in.


Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #82  
Old March 16th, 2010, 8:12 pm
Rastaban43's Avatar
Rastaban43  Male.gif Rastaban43 is offline
Representative Homosexual
 
Joined: 4991 days
Location: chaos organisé
Age: 35
Posts: 4,107
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

What a great idea for a thread! XD

Quote:
Originally Posted by Katze View Post
On Southern accents...it's painful to listen to when people get it wrong.
I hate that too. Being from the south, perhaps I'm a little over-sensitive about it, but it seems like southern accents are similar to Australian accents in that they're really easy to mimic. Anyone with enough humility to listen to their accent coach ought to be able to pull it off just fine, but no-o-o, everyone and their dog think it's so-o-o easy to mimic. They end up sounding completely dumb. It doesn't help the actors that there are several different southern accents. I wish they'd just listen.

Reese Witherspoon did a great job in Sweet Home Alabama if only slightly exaggerated (but still pretty accurate), but some of her fellow acting southerners - not so much.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tenshi View Post
I'm always amazed how actors can switch from one accent to the other one.
I notice this with the French and Italian films I see. Sometimes I can pick out really exaggerated accents (like Marseille or Napolitano) but mimicking them myself is probably just not possible. XD

One of the worst accents in the world belongs to Sean Connery. No matter what film he's in, he manages to be a bloody boring version of Scottish. XD

I saw A Single Man recently and Nicholas Hoult was playing a Californian college boy from the '60s. I'm no expert on that specific accent, but I thought he did a fantastic job with it. At least, you could tell he really worked with an accent coach and got whatever it was they were working with spot on.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old July 25th, 2011, 1:17 am
TheScribbler  Female.gif TheScribbler is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 2982 days
Location: Having tea in the TARDIS
Posts: 167
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

I thought Johnny Depp's accent in Finding Neverland was great- but then again, I'm not Scottish, so what do I know!
Freddie Highmore was brilliant doing an American accent in August Rush. It seems like most English actors, when trying to be American, go way over the top, but Freddie kept it nice and subtle.
As for the cringe-worthy: poor, poor Dick van **** (sorry, censors!). His cockney accent was awful! But he's so dang adorable, it doesn't distract me much.


__________________

--
"Words are, in my not-so-humble opinion, our most inexhaustible source of magic."
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old July 25th, 2011, 8:19 am
canismajoris  Male.gif canismajoris is offline
The Forums Red Hypergiant Star
 
Joined: 4602 days
Location: əɹəɥ
Age: 35
Posts: 2,766
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
I think it was one of those occasions where the part demanded a pantomime version of what most British and American people imagine a Bulgarian accent sounds like, not a real Bulgarian accent. IMO, the writing was to blame, not Ianevski.
Well for what it's worth, I think we should remember he was playing someone described as "not particularly loquacious."


Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old August 29th, 2011, 10:27 pm
Nielo  Female.gif Nielo is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 2604 days
Posts: 147
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

Being Dutch, I don't often notice when British/American/Australian accents are done badly (especially when they're supposed to be from a specific part of one of those countries), but Alan Rickman and Emma Thompson trying to sound American in Judas Kiss really made me cringe. I love both of them, but that was just... wrong.


__________________
"If you’re going through hell, keep going." Winston Churchill


Wand: Larch, Unicorn Core, 10 3/4, Slightly Yielding
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old August 30th, 2011, 10:56 am
Melaszka's Avatar
Melaszka  Female.gif Melaszka is offline
HighFunctioning Sociopath
 
Joined: 4508 days
Location: England
Age: 50
Posts: 3,294
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

There's been a lot of controversy about Anne Hathaway's allegedly "Yorkshire" accent in One Day, with some reviews saying that she appears to go on a round-Britain tour, slipping between Yorkshire, London and Liverpool, amongst other places, but other reviews seem to think it's OK and point out that most people who move away from their place of birth for work or to go to university tend to talk in a mixed accent and slip in and out, anyway (I know that's true of me).

Having said that, class is usually central to Nicholls's books, so in this case I think the Yorkshire accent is crucial to marking the character's social background.

I haven't seen the film, though - I'm tempted to, just to check out the famous accent!


Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old August 31st, 2011, 1:33 am
Williwaw  Female.gif Williwaw is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2592 days
Location: in a box
Age: 48
Posts: 66
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

I am somewhat surprised that Gary Oldman has not rated a mention thus far. He is a master of dialect imitation...though his New York-Irish accent in State of Grace left a lot to be desired. Daniel Day Lewis and Hugh Laurie should receive notable mentions for their ofttimes used American accents.

The most appalling 'fake' accent I have ever had the displeasure of hearing was Meryl Streep's in Evil Angels/A Cry In The Dark. Not only was it a bit too thick at times but often incomprehensible.


__________________
Professor Severus Snape - brooding, detached, sarcastic, misanthropic, indomitable, complex, enigmatic. PERFECT. The embodiment of a writer's beautiful but damned dream man. "...a gift of a character" - J.K. Rowling

"The mind is not a book, to be opened at will and examined at leisure...The mind is a complex and many-layered thing."

"Would you like me to do it now? Or would you like a few moments to compose an epitaph?"

"And my soul, Dumbledore? Mine?"
---
Pottermore : StormElm168 - House: Gryffindor
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old August 31st, 2011, 2:04 am
bellaminx  Female.gif bellaminx is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2866 days
Location: Scotland, UK.
Posts: 15
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

I'm from the UK, Scotland near Edinburgh.

Again I know it's not a movie but James Masters who played Spike in Buffy had an amazing accent- I remember watching on of the specials on the dvd set and being really shocked when I heard who he spoke.

One of the worst accents I ever heard was again not a movie but Helen Baxendale in friends put on this really stupid accent, all the more ludicrous was that she is British in the first place but somehow felt the need to change her accent and sound more 'posh'. I think the mistake a lot of actors make is overdoing it so the accent just sounds awful and unbelievable. It happens a lot with Scottish accents- I think because I am from Scotland I can tell where is Scotland someone is from but how they talk but to someone outside we just all sound Scottish. For that reason a lot of Scottish accents I hear on film just sound a bit off.


Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old August 31st, 2011, 2:28 pm
Hysteria's Avatar
Hysteria  Undisclosed.gif Hysteria is offline
Registered Animagus
 
Joined: 5060 days
Location: Far away from you...
Posts: 4,146
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

I think one reason many Australians take issue with actors getting our accent wrong is because they go for the occa Australian accent. Most Australians live in cities, and I've never met a single one who speaks like they do in movies. If anything we sound more British IMO.


__________________
liebe ist für alle da
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old September 3rd, 2011, 10:04 pm
Rhovanion  Female.gif Rhovanion is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2587 days
Location: Skógum Svíţjóđar
Age: 34
Posts: 21
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

I always cringe whenever a Swedish actor or actress tries to do a British or American accent. Fails [almost] every time. I can always hear the Swedish in there.

Then again, I always cringe whenever someone NOT Scandinavian tries to do a Swedish accent in films and on TV. It always ends up sounding like a combination of Russian and German.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hysteria View Post
I think one reason many Australians take issue with actors getting our accent wrong is because they go for the occa Australian accent. Most Australians live in cities, and I've never met a single one who speaks like they do in movies. If anything we sound more British IMO.
I grew up watching a lot of Aussie programs on TV, like Prisoner (Cell Block H), Flying Doctors, Neighbours, Ocean Girl, The Girl From Tomorrow, Halfway Across The Galaxy And Turn Left, Mirror Mirror (etc) and in all of those you could hear a very strong distinct Aussie accent (and some Kiwi in the case of Mirror Mirror), so that's what I think of whenever someone mentions Australia. Are any of those representative?


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #91  
Old September 7th, 2011, 11:21 am
Pearl_Took's Avatar
Pearl_Took  Female.gif Pearl_Took is offline
Zonko's Employee
 
Joined: 3952 days
Location: The Shire
Posts: 3,634
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
There's been a lot of controversy about Anne Hathaway's allegedly "Yorkshire" accent in One Day, with some reviews saying that she appears to go on a round-Britain tour, slipping between Yorkshire, London and Liverpool, amongst other places, but other reviews seem to think it's OK and point out that most people who move away from their place of birth for work or to go to university tend to talk in a mixed accent and slip in and out, anyway (I know that's true of me).
Having seen the film, I give Anne a lot of leeway. It's certainly not a broad Yorkshire accent she's mastered ... she just sounds like someone who was originally from the North of England but has lived in London for a very long time. I also thought she came across as English, personality-wise: wry and self-depreciating, with a dry sense of humour.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old September 7th, 2011, 11:55 am
Melaszka's Avatar
Melaszka  Female.gif Melaszka is offline
HighFunctioning Sociopath
 
Joined: 4508 days
Location: England
Age: 50
Posts: 3,294
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pearl_Took View Post
Having seen the film, I give Anne a lot of leeway. It's certainly not a broad Yorkshire accent she's mastered ... she just sounds like someone who was originally from the North of England but has lived in London for a very long time. I also thought she came across as English, personality-wise: wry and self-depreciating, with a dry sense of humour.
That's interesting. I'm even more intrigued to see it now! As long as she sounds convincingly British, and less RP than the actor playing the posh guy, I'd be happy.

I do think sometimes that when an actor is cast for a part in an accent which is not native to them, they often attract far more scrutiny, and are submitted to unfairly higher standards, than a native actor would.


Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old September 7th, 2011, 12:18 pm
Williwaw  Female.gif Williwaw is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2592 days
Location: in a box
Age: 48
Posts: 66
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hysteria View Post
I think one reason many Australians take issue with actors getting our accent wrong is because they go for the occa Australian accent. Most Australians live in cities, and I've never met a single one who speaks like they do in movies. If anything we sound more British IMO.
With the tyranny of distance no longer being a barrier to outside influences (so-to-speak) the Australian accent has dramatically shifted away from the urbanised strine laced accent to more of a cultivated Australian English accent. The 'foreign' film industry is yet to recognise this fact...Even Australian films have a tendency to bend in deference to the stereotypical 'ocker' Australian accent, strine and all.

When I hear the overdone 'Ocker' accent it is like nails on a chalkboard to my ears. *shudder*


__________________
Professor Severus Snape - brooding, detached, sarcastic, misanthropic, indomitable, complex, enigmatic. PERFECT. The embodiment of a writer's beautiful but damned dream man. "...a gift of a character" - J.K. Rowling

"The mind is not a book, to be opened at will and examined at leisure...The mind is a complex and many-layered thing."

"Would you like me to do it now? Or would you like a few moments to compose an epitaph?"

"And my soul, Dumbledore? Mine?"
---
Pottermore : StormElm168 - House: Gryffindor
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old November 10th, 2011, 7:47 pm
yorkiedoodle's Avatar
yorkiedoodle  Female.gif yorkiedoodle is offline
Fourth Year
 
Joined: 2572 days
Location: Beautiful Yorkshire
Age: 56
Posts: 522
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
That's interesting. I'm even more intrigued to see it now! As long as she sounds convincingly British, and less RP than the actor playing the posh guy, I'd be happy.

I do think sometimes that when an actor is cast for a part in an accent which is not native to them, they often attract far more scrutiny, and are submitted to unfairly higher standards, than a native actor would.
I live in Yorkshire ( and have done for 23 years) and I really don't have a problem with her accent. It's a good general northern accent.

Russell Crowe playing Robin Hood however, was another story completely! (Holds head in hands at the memory!)

Did you ever see the film?


Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old November 10th, 2011, 10:09 pm
AnotherD  Undisclosed.gif AnotherD is offline
Fourth Year
 
Joined: 2866 days
Location: Ohio
Age: 45
Posts: 615
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

I'll give props to Robert Pattinson for his American accent. Since I don't really pay much attention to him other than the movies I've seen him in, I was surprised to hear what he really sounds like when he talks in his natural accent! Christian Bale is the same--I had no idea he wasn't American

Quote:
I hate that too. Being from the south, perhaps I'm a little over-sensitive about it, but it seems like southern accents are similar to Australian accents in that they're really easy to mimic. Anyone with enough humility to listen to their accent coach ought to be able to pull it off just fine, but no-o-o, everyone and their dog think it's so-o-o easy to mimic. They end up sounding completely dumb. It doesn't help the actors that there are several different southern accents. I wish they'd just listen.
The difficulty with Southern accents is that people don't realize the subtle differences between them. A person from Atlanta sounds different than a person from Mississippi, who sounds different from someone from West Virginia and so on. Everyone can do a general 'hick' southern accent but it's not accurate when it comes to geography.

It's funny, I never really paid attention to how many distinct American regional accents there are, but there are SO many! I'm sure it's true for any country but being American I never really thought beyond the basics: Southern, New York, Jersey, Boston, Upper Midwest (think Fargo).

I love this kind of stuff, though! Fascinating.


Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old January 5th, 2012, 10:14 pm
yorkiedoodle's Avatar
yorkiedoodle  Female.gif yorkiedoodle is offline
Fourth Year
 
Joined: 2572 days
Location: Beautiful Yorkshire
Age: 56
Posts: 522
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

Robert Downey Jnr has nailed the British accent in Sherlock Holmes - I saw the second film again this week with a friend who came out of the cinema convinced he was British!


Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old January 12th, 2012, 8:26 am
endywalk  Undisclosed.gif endywalk is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 2452 days
Posts: 1
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

Australian accent's sound great to me.

______________________
Lumex Rollators | Dolomite Jazz Rollator



Last edited by endywalk; January 24th, 2012 at 5:33 am.
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old January 12th, 2012, 7:58 pm
yorkiedoodle's Avatar
yorkiedoodle  Female.gif yorkiedoodle is offline
Fourth Year
 
Joined: 2572 days
Location: Beautiful Yorkshire
Age: 56
Posts: 522
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

I enjoyed the King's Speech - and I thought Jennifer Ehle's Australian accent was good - but an Australian friend saw the film and commented that her accent sounded much more like a new Zealamd accent than an Australian one.....


Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old January 13th, 2012, 4:41 am
ccollinsmith's Avatar
ccollinsmith  Female.gif ccollinsmith is offline
Nitwit! Blubber! Oddment! Tweak!
 
Joined: 3196 days
Location: The Village
Posts: 2,270
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

There are actually lots of examples of UK actors pulling off convincing American accents. Here are a few of my favorites:
  • Kenneth Branagh and Emma Thompson in Dead Again. (Perfect Los Angeles accents - and I'm originally Angeleno, so I should know ).
  • Bob Hoskins in Who Framed Roger Rabbit.
  • And of course, Vivien Leigh in Gone with the Wind.
Irish actors Colin Farrell and Cillian Murphy also do solid American accents. (I'm thinking of Colin in Minority Report and Cillian in Inception).

I defer to my UK friends on UK accents, but I did enjoy Alan Rickman's northern accent in Blow Dry. Was it supposed to be Yorkshire?


__________________



Hogsmeade Awards 2013: Voted #1 - Biggest Cat Lover | Voted #2 - Most Creative Member |
Voted #2 - Most Likely to Make a Doctor Who Reference


VIVA LA GLITTELUTION!

Last edited by ccollinsmith; January 13th, 2012 at 4:48 am.
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old January 13th, 2012, 6:04 am
Wab's Avatar
Wab  Undisclosed.gif Wab is offline
The Next Great Adventurer
 
Joined: 5439 days
Location: Mornington Crescent
Posts: 15,280
Re: Accents in Films: The Good, the Bad and the Cringeworthy

When he was starting in the US Australian actor Anthony LaPaglia concentrated so much on developing a Brooklyn accent that his natural accent is almost gone.


__________________
A patriot is someone who wants the best for his country, including the best laws and the best ideals. It's something other people should call you -- you shouldn't call yourself that. People who call themselves patriots are usually liars. -- Donald Woods

You got what anybody gets . . . You got a lifetime. -- Death of the Endless
Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back  Chamber of Secrets > Diagon Alley > In Cinemas & General Movie discussion

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 1:29 am.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Original content is Copyright © MMII - MMVIII, CoSForums.com. All Rights Reserved.
Other content (posts, images, etc) is Copyright © its respective owners.