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Hermione Granger: Character Analysis



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  #21  
Old July 30th, 2007, 3:53 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

1 Hermione's afraid of failure,so as defense mechanism, she studies obsessively and tries very hard to do everything literally by-the-book. How have her insecurities and defense mechanisms affected her development as a character throughout the series, and what are some other ones? In what ways have they hindered or helped her ? What causes her to feel this way, and has she become more secure with herself throughout the series?

Fear of failure has been a characteristic of Hermione's throughout the books - look at her boggart! I wonder whether her parents (who were both professional people) had made a lot of her good results in the past and made her think she had to achieve to please them? I know a lot of people get stuck in that trap. But she is clearly VERY intelligent and I think would have been the best witch in her year even if she wasn't afraid of failing. She often seems to read and learn for the sheer pleasure of it, which Ron certainly doesn't understand. I do though! I think she has become more secure with herself as she has grown up and realised that her friends are there for her whether she is being a genius or not.

2. Hermione repeatedly defends and helps those who can't defend or help themselves. Early in the series, on the first ride on the Hogwarts Express, she starts helping Neville out with his toad and continues to help him out in Potions despite being told not to. In PoA she also works very hard to make a defense for Buckbeak, and in GoF she starts S.P.E.W. to end the opression of house elves. How similar is this to Harry's "saving people thing," and what does it say about her character?

She is a very goodhearted girl and loves to be helpful. She has a passion for justice which can sometimes overcome her common sense (intelligence and common sense not being the same thing!). SPEW is the best example. She looks at the House Elves and compares their lot with what she knows of the Muggle world, where their enslavement would be a crime. She never really tries to find out how the elves themselves think of it and whether they are happy. When Hagrid refused to join SPEW you'd think that would give her pause, but no! She is so sure she is right. I think that was something of a negative aspect of her character, that she found it hard to admit she might be wrong. But it was all done with a real concern for what she saw as a need, and you have to give her credit for that.
3.Hermione is very intuitive when it comes to others' emotions. She seems to understand a lot about how both Cho and Harry are feeling during their "relationship" and notices Harry's feelings for Ginny before anyone else. She also berates Ron a lot for his "emotional range of a teaspoon" which implies that she notices how people feel more than he does. However, she hardly ever talks about her own feelings, and most of them are expressed only through actions, like the flock of birds in HBP. Is this related in anyway to her insecurity? How does her relationship with Ron and Harry affect this part of personality? How do her relationships with other girls ( Ginny, Luna, Parvati, Lavendar, Pansy, etc.) affect it? Or how do they reflect that part of her?

Hermione understands feelings, which I would have thought was fairly typical of a teenage girl as opposed to boys. I don't think this means she is an overtly emotional person herself, but that she has a good understanding of how people relate. In my friendship group we sometimes divide girls into "Elinors" and "Mariannes" (from Sense & Sensibility). Elinors are fairly introverted, keep to the rules and don't let other people know what they are thinking or feeling. Mariannes wear their heart on their sleeve, are far more extroverted and like to kick over conventions. Hermione is a typical Elinor, I'd say, which is no bad thing.

4. Hermione, being Muggleborn, must travel back and forth between the "Muggle world" in which her parents live and the wizarding world in which the majority of events in her life take place. She doesn't go home as often as some of the other students, choosing to spend time either at Hogwarts or with the Weasleys. When she becomes a prefect she comments that she wants to tell her parents because it will be something they will understand. What does this say about her connection to the wizarding world and her relationship with her parents? What do you think of her decision to modify her parent's memories?

I'd noticed in the earlier books that despite being away from her parents for most of the year at school, she spends time away from them in the holidays too. And I'd wondered how they felt about that. I think Hermione, having found her niche as a witch, didn't really feel comfortable in the Muggle world any more. She evidently loves her parents but there seems to be a bit of a gulf of understanding between them. I'm sorry we didn't meet the Graingers more than we did in the books.

As to her plan to modify their memories, I found that very moving. She wanted to keep them secure and this involved their forgetting all about her. That was a ral sacrifice on her part and showed how well she understood the danger she was going in to, and her desire to keep her parents safe but also to ensure that they wouldn't be tortured to give away information.

5. What does Hermione contribute to the Trio, both on a normal social basis and in the challenges they face together throughout the series? How do her strengths get them through things, and how do her weaknesses hold them back?

We are each supposed to be directed by our minds, our hearts or our guts. Harry goes by his gut instincts most of the time and he isn't usually that far wrong (well, OK, Snape...). Ron is the heart-man - he may not understand exactly what is happening much of the time but he is intensely loyal to Harry & Hermione - the heart of a lion. Hermione is the one ruled by her head. Things must make sense to her or she can't commit herself to them. She reasons everything out and uses her immense book-knowledge to make her conclusions. So the trio are coming from all angles which is why they work so very well together. Without Hermione's logic and reason, the lads would be off doing hare-brained things and getting themselves into trouble. She is what keeps them on track.

6. What do you think Hermione went on to do post DH? What consequences did its events have for her?

Well as JKR says she went into the Dept of Magical Law Enforcement, we can presumably consider that the answer! A bit of foretelling on Scrimgeour's part when he asked if she was considering a career in law! I think she would have done a lot to ensure that the unjust laws were rewritten and to make sure that the magical creatures got a fair crack of the whip. It wouldn't surprise me if she became Minister for Magic one day. I'd have been interested to see more of her as a mother - a career woman I can see but Mummy Hermione I find a bit harder to picture and I'd have liked to have seen it.


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  #22  
Old August 6th, 2007, 9:34 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

Hey, I'd just like to ask why did Dumbledore call Hermione 'Hermione Jean Granger' in his will? (I don't have DH with me, so I don't know the exact page number.) Is it because he forgot that her middle name is Jane or is it just because my copy has a typo or something? I'd just like to know.


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Old August 8th, 2007, 10:56 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

I really appreciated the fact that she's able to go through insults. She bore to be called Mudblood and even said, "Mudblood, and proud of it!". This is indeed a step forward in HP world.


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  #24  
Old August 10th, 2007, 11:53 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

Her name was Jane at some point when Rowling was writing the series.

Then Dolores came along, and Rowling didn't want her main girl character have really any connection to that nasty piece of work so she changed it to Jean.

Which, imo, is a better name than Jane.


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Old August 10th, 2007, 6:57 pm
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

I find it highly unrealistic that Hermione parents were in the books so little.I don't meant hey had to be central like the Weasley parents,but it seems everybody parents(or guardians) got more time then them.I mean Harry and Ron met them once.Rowling should have at least had her mention them a bit more.


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Old August 10th, 2007, 7:59 pm
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

I agree, Simon's mom got more screentime then them, I mean seriously.


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Old August 11th, 2007, 7:39 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

So while reading DH, I realized something I'd never picked up before: Hermione is afraid of the dead. This appears to be a pretty specific fear--she's not afraid to face death herself, as she has chosen again and again to remain by Harry's side despite the danger; she's also not afraid of ghosts, as Moaning Myrtle doesn't bother her, and she was eager to attend Nearly-Headless Nick's Deathday party back in CoS ("it'll be fascinating!").

With hindsight, I now recognize that the first indication of this fear is in OotP, as the sextet encounters the Veil Room in the Department of Mysteries:
OotP, pg. 774 American Hardback ed."Let's go," called Hermione from halfway up the stone steps. "This isn't right, Harry, come on, let's go."

She sounded scared, much more scared than she had in the room where the brains swam, yet Harry thought the archway had a kind of beauty about it, old though it was. The gently rippling veil intrigued him; he felt a very strong inclination to climb up on the dais and walk through it.

"Harry, let's go, OK?" said Hermione more forcefully.

[snip]

"I can hear them too," breathed Luna, joining them around the side of the archway and gazing at the swaying veil. "There are people in there!"

"What do you mean, 'in there'?" demanded Hermione, jumping down from the bottom step and sounding much angrier than the occasion warranted, "there isn't any 'in there', it's just an archway, there's no room for anybody to be there. Harry, stop it, come away - "

She grabbed his arm and pulled, but he resisted.

"Harry, we are supposed to be here for Sirius!" she said in a high-pitched, strained voice.

[snip]

"What d'you reckon that arch was?" Harry asked Hermione as they regained the dark circular room.

"I don't know, but whatever it was, it was dangerous," she said firmly, again inscribing a fiery cross on the door.

Hermione's rationale for her behavior--that she wanted to leave what she recognized to be a dangerous place--is belied by her overly-emotional reaction to the room. I now think that all of the sextet sensed the presence of the dead behind the Veil and reacted accordingly; Harry, for example, reacted with longing and Luna with interest. Hermione, in contrast, wanted to get away as quickly as possible. [I can't tell you how many times I've had to stop myself from typing "scared to death" in this post ]

Anyway, I believed Hermione's rationale until I read DH, and saw all the instances where she is shown to be terrified of the dead (possibly only of the physical manifestation? I'm not actually sure).

So here's Hermione reacting badly to the idea of Moody's body being disposed of by Death Eaters:
DH, pg. 94 American Hardback ed."Yeah," said Harry. "Like Barty Crouch, turned into a bone and buried in Hagrid's front garden. They probably transfigured Moody and stuffed him--"

"Don't!" squealed Hermione. Startled, Harry looked over just in time to see her burst into tears over her copy of Spellman's Syllabary.

And then her intense terror at the illusion of Dumbledore's corpse at #12 GP:
DH, pg. 171 American Hardback ed.Coughing, his eyes watering, Harry looked around to see Hermione crouched on the floor by the door with her arms over her head, and Ron, who was shaking from head to foot, patting her clumsily on the shoulder and saying, "It's all r-right.... It's gone...."
It's true that Ron is shaken up by the corpse's appearance as well (even Harry is a bit rattled), but Hermione's reaction is clearly the most intense. She's so freaked out by it for the rest of that night that she can't even bear to be left in a room by herself.

This is Hermione's reaction to the last known remains of Mad-Eye Moody:
DH, pg. 271 American Hardback ed.Harry put his hand in his pocket and drew out Mad-Eye's eye. Hermione recoiled, looking horrified.

And here's the point where I wonder if Hermione is scared of more than simply corpses:
DH, pg. 427 American Hardback ed."But they weren't really back from the dead, were they?" said Hermione. "Those kinds of--of pale imitations aren't the same as truly bringing someone back to life."

"But she, the girl in the tale, didn't really come back, did she? The story says that once people are dead, they belong with the dead. But the second brother still got to see her and talk to her, didn't he? He even lived with her for a while...."

He saw concern and something less easily definable in Hermione's expression. Then, as she glanced at Ron, Harry realized that it was fear: He had scared her with his talk of living with dead people."
I can't tell if she's scared of the dead in general (and again, she's not scared of ghosts!), or of the graphic idea of an actual dead person walking around, zombie-like.

And in this section, we're back to a specific fear of dead bodies:
DH, pg. 503 American Hardback ed.The odd thing was that Hermione's support made him feel just as confused as Ron's doubts. Now forced to accept that the Elder Wand was real, she maintained that it was an evil object, and the way Voldemort had taken possession of it was repellent, not to be considered.

"You could never have done that, Harry," she said again and again. "You couldn't have broken into Dumbledore's grave."

But the idea of Dumbledore's corpse frightened Harry much less than the possibility that he might have misunderstood the living Dumbledore's intentions.


So my question for you guys is: what are the implications, if any, of this fear for Hermione's character? Because despite Rowling's claim that "In many ways all of my characters are defined by their attitude to death or the possiblity of death," I don't see how this aspect of Hermione's character motivates her behavior in any of the books (except for trying to get Harry the heck away from the Veil in OotP).



Last edited by Claudia; August 11th, 2007 at 8:00 am.
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  #28  
Old August 11th, 2007, 9:01 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

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Originally Posted by Claudia View Post
So while reading DH, I realized something I'd never picked up before: Hermione is afraid of the dead. This appears to be a pretty specific fear--she's not afraid to face death herself, as she has chosen again and again to remain by Harry's side despite the danger; she's also not afraid of ghosts, as Moaning Myrtle doesn't bother her, and she was eager to attend Nearly-Headless Nick's Deathday party back in CoS ("it'll be fascinating!").

With hindsight, I now recognize that the first indication of this fear is in OotP, as the sextet encounters the Veil Room in the Department of Mysteries:
OotP, pg. 774 American Hardback ed."Let's go," called Hermione from halfway up the stone steps. "This isn't right, Harry, come on, let's go."

She sounded scared, much more scared than she had in the room where the brains swam, yet Harry thought the archway had a kind of beauty about it, old though it was. The gently rippling veil intrigued him; he felt a very strong inclination to climb up on the dais and walk through it.

"Harry, let's go, OK?" said Hermione more forcefully.

[snip]

"I can hear them too," breathed Luna, joining them around the side of the archway and gazing at the swaying veil. "There are people in there!"

"What do you mean, 'in there'?" demanded Hermione, jumping down from the bottom step and sounding much angrier than the occasion warranted, "there isn't any 'in there', it's just an archway, there's no room for anybody to be there. Harry, stop it, come away - "

She grabbed his arm and pulled, but he resisted.

"Harry, we are supposed to be here for Sirius!" she said in a high-pitched, strained voice.

[snip]

"What d'you reckon that arch was?" Harry asked Hermione as they regained the dark circular room.

"I don't know, but whatever it was, it was dangerous," she said firmly, again inscribing a fiery cross on the door.

Hermione's rationale for her behavior--that she wanted to leave what she recognized to be a dangerous place--is belied by her overly-emotional reaction to the room. I now think that all of the sextet sensed the presence of the dead behind the Veil and reacted accordingly; Harry, for example, reacted with longing and Luna with interest. Hermione, in contrast, wanted to get away as quickly as possible. [I can't tell you how many times I've had to stop myself from typing "scared to death" in this post ]

Anyway, I believed Hermione's rationale until I read DH, and saw all the instances where she is shown to be terrified of the dead (possibly only of the physical manifestation? I'm not actually sure).

So here's Hermione reacting badly to the idea of Moody's body being disposed of by Death Eaters:
DH, pg. 94 American Hardback ed."Yeah," said Harry. "Like Barty Crouch, turned into a bone and buried in Hagrid's front garden. They probably transfigured Moody and stuffed him--"

"Don't!" squealed Hermione. Startled, Harry looked over just in time to see her burst into tears over her copy of Spellman's Syllabary.

And then her intense terror at the illusion of Dumbledore's corpse at #12 GP:
DH, pg. 171 American Hardback ed.Coughing, his eyes watering, Harry looked around to see Hermione crouched on the floor by the door with her arms over her head, and Ron, who was shaking from head to foot, patting her clumsily on the shoulder and saying, "It's all r-right.... It's gone...."
It's true that Ron is shaken up by the corpse's appearance as well (even Harry is a bit rattled), but Hermione's reaction is clearly the most intense. She's so freaked out by it for the rest of that night that she can't even bear to be left in a room by herself.

This is Hermione's reaction to the last known remains of Mad-Eye Moody:
DH, pg. 271 American Hardback ed.Harry put his hand in his pocket and drew out Mad-Eye's eye. Hermione recoiled, looking horrified.

And here's the point where I wonder if Hermione is scared of more than simply corpses:
DH, pg. 427 American Hardback ed."But they weren't really back from the dead, were they?" said Hermione. "Those kinds of--of pale imitations aren't the same as truly bringing someone back to life."

"But she, the girl in the tale, didn't really come back, did she? The story says that once people are dead, they belong with the dead. But the second brother still got to see her and talk to her, didn't he? He even lived with her for a while...."

He saw concern and something less easily definable in Hermione's expression. Then, as she glanced at Ron, Harry realized that it was fear: He had scared her with his talk of living with dead people."
I can't tell if she's scared of the dead in general (and again, she's not scared of ghosts!), or of the graphic idea of an actual dead person walking around, zombie-like.

And in this section, we're back to a specific fear of dead bodies:
DH, pg. 503 American Hardback ed.The odd thing was that Hermione's support made him feel just as confused as Ron's doubts. Now forced to accept that the Elder Wand was real, she maintained that it was an evil object, and the way Voldemort had taken possession of it was repellent, not to be considered.

"You could never have done that, Harry," she said again and again. "You couldn't have broken into Dumbledore's grave."

But the idea of Dumbledore's corpse frightened Harry much less than the possibility that he might have misunderstood the living Dumbledore's intentions.


So my question for you guys is: what are the implications, if any, of this fear for Hermione's character? Because despite Rowling's claim that "In many ways all of my characters are defined by their attitude to death or the possiblity of death," I don't see how this aspect of Hermione's character motivates her behavior in any of the books (except for trying to get Harry the heck away from the Veil in OotP).
That's pretty big find. But I have to remind you. of this: in OotP, when they meet the Thestrals. Hermoine is like. "But they're really facinating aren't they? How some people can see them and other's can't? I wish i could." Harry: 'You better hope they stay invisible." Hermoine: "Oh, i'm sorry harry that was stupid."

Clearly, the roles have switched in this occasion.


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  #29  
Old August 11th, 2007, 11:32 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

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So while reading DH, I realized something I'd never picked up before:..........................see how this aspect of Hermione's character motivates her behavior in any of the books (except for trying to get Harry the heck away from the Veil in OotP).
The thing is dying in the magical world isn't always a straight forward matter.There are ways to go on existing,not just in less worse form like ghosts,but in the form of inferi.Also of all Hermione the one who read the book about horcruxes(and other gruesome books too),so she knows more about the nasty kind of magic.Not only does she know these things but being Hermione,she has a deep understanding of them.Also Hermione is a very gentle kind of person,more then anyone she seems to get emotionally distraught over other peoples suffering and general misery.Look at her reaction to kreacher,even though his treatment of her has never been good.Hermione a very kind sole.Death is more of a realistic prospect in the last book.they have always been relatively safe,in DH they're on their own.
In short I don't think Hermione fears death itself,maybe the manner of death and the certain cases of un-dead creatures.


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Old August 11th, 2007, 12:35 pm
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

I don't think Hermione's supposed fear of the dead is anything unusual, because she's just so real. She' the most convincing of all the characters in the whole series, in my opinion, and a natural human fear would be something totally into place to her character.

Although I personally don't think a pronounced fear of the dead or of death has been shown in Hermione.


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Old August 14th, 2007, 3:46 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

I would agree that Hermione has a fear of death that might be more intense than other charecters. Hermione is intelectual and inquisitive. Death is something that we can't study adequately. Just as Dumbledore said in the Cave, it is the unknown we fear when we look at death. Because death is impenetrable to our knowledge it makes sense that Hermione would be afraid of it.

The issue that I think is related to this but much more serious is Hermione's unique brand of closedmindedness as Xeno Lovegood called it. The first time we had an encounter with this was in PoA with Trelawney. In OotP Luna constantly clashes with her also. It annoys me that JKR chose three of the most rediculous charecters to expose Hermione's greatest flaw.

But this flaw is real. Hermione is revealed to have a certain disregard and contempt for what can't be revealed to be true or real by logical means. Its a lack of faith or openmindedness or whatever that is disturbing to me because the other charecter who demonstrates this flaw at such levels is Voldemort himself.

It bothered me that Hermione is never caught in her error in her dealings with that flaw while we have several major episodes regarding Ron's flaws that are painful to read; open and brutally stark. Hermione never gets such an overt confrontation with her own frailties in the series. It is much more subtle.

Her insistance that there was no "in there" to the Veil is refuted by Luna and Harry himself, but not in Hermione's presence. She continues to scoff at Trelawney and the notions of prophecy even when she has Harry's authentic account of the PoA prophecy, that verifies that there is at least something to it. Hermione fiercely maintains that a Resurection Stone is ludicrous. But we never get to see Hermione's reaction to Harry's story regarding the Stone and what happened when he used it.

So I suppose I'm annoyed that Hermione never really got painfully confronted by her own weaknesses as Harry and Ron did throughout the books. I think we got a few little tidbits in DH. When Harry, Ron and Hermione ponder which Hallow they would crave Hermione is the only one to answer "The Cloak". Ron responds by saying "you only picked it because thats the right answer" or something of that sort, which I took to be true. At Kings Cross Dumbledore confesses that he counted on Hermione to slow Harry's persuit of the Hallows down once he knew about them. Dumbledore's statement does not imply that he counted on Hermione to be wise about the Hallows. Rather, it implies that he counted on Hermione's closedmindedness and logical refusal to believe in the Hallows to delay Harry. I think Dumbledore was relying more on her weakness than her strength.

But still I felt like Hermione's charecter at the end of the series remains too pristine. Dumbledore said Harry was the "better man", the one in a million that could unite the Hallows. But thinking about it, isnt another such person in the trio? Isn't Hermione the wise one? I felt like not enough was done to prove why Harry was that diamond in the rough. I feel like Hermione seems too wise. Ibelieve that there is sufficent evidence that Hermione has certain flaws that push Harry into another level. But I feel like JKR shouted to the hills Ron's unworthiness why Hermione's is just a whisper. I felt like things were unbalanced in this way at the end, and I practically dread how trumped up Hermione is going to become in the HBP and DH films, since she already sucks up any bit of wisdom any of the trio come up with in the other films.


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Old August 14th, 2007, 8:57 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

yeah, i sort of feel that way too Strider. i posted something about this on the abandonment thread as well. i have also wondered why we're not as privy to hermione's weaknesses as we are to ron's, or even to harry's.

i get that she's a subtle character, and i guess i'm ok with that. it's just that i was so satisfied with the deep, rich way jk rowling wrote harry and ron. i love them because they had so much to overcome, and they did it. i think "pristine" is accurate. sure, hermione has weakness and insecurities, but these are merely glossed over, especially when you look at her next to harry, who has to overcome temptation and the pain of his past, or next to ron who has to overcome his feelings of inferiority, and whose flaws are, as you said, "brutally stark." i mean, ron's learning experiences are always quite painful. and harry has to struggle - heck, he has to DIE - to gain the kind of wisdom he does at the end of DH. but hermione, it seems, is already there.

don't get me wrong, hermione's amazing. but i LOVED jk for writing harry and ron with such obvious flaws...because they both had to work so hard to overcome these flaws. both were incredibly satsifying character journeys.

i wonder why she chose a different route with hermione.


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Old August 14th, 2007, 9:27 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

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But still I felt like Hermione's charecter at the end of the series remains too pristine. Dumbledore said Harry was the "better man", the one in a million that could unite the Hallows. But thinking about it, isnt another such person in the trio? Isn't Hermione the wise one? I felt like not enough was done to prove why Harry was that diamond in the rough. I feel like Hermione seems too wise. Ibelieve that there is sufficient evidence that Hermione has certain flaws that push Harry into another level. But I feel like JKR shouted to the hills Ron's unworthiness why Hermione's is just a whisper. I felt like things were unbalanced in this way at the end, and I practically dread how trumped up Hermione is going to become in the HBP and DH films, since she already sucks up any bit of wisdom any of the trio come up with in the other films.
Because Hermione strengths are not necessarily seen as that,top some they seem to be weaknesses.Shes cautiousness ,some would say shes less brave,she's responsible,some call that boring.She alwsy prepared,but Ron usually tells her she worries to much.Some people say she goes to extremes in her pursuit of knowledge(her homework), or to understand things(that she narrow minded),but Hermione's thought patters are helpful,a person constantly disagreeing with you will force you to look at your debate in a new way.I've never seen Hermione as celebrated,it's Harry that brave,Ron that loyal,Ginny thats independent fiery,so many others.

Quote:
and I practically dread how trumped up Hermione is going to become in the HBP and DH films, since she already sucks up any bit of wisdom any of the trio come up with in the other films.
Film Hermione another matter.I hate that too,and shes given everyone lines.CoS might have been called 'Hermione ,arry and the ginger mute' (ron really says that little)



Last edited by Ifink2much; August 14th, 2007 at 9:31 am.
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Old August 14th, 2007, 10:25 am
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

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Originally Posted by banana_fritter View Post
Hey, I'd just like to ask why did Dumbledore call Hermione 'Hermione Jean Granger' in his will? (I don't have DH with me, so I don't know the exact page number.) Is it because he forgot that her middle name is Jane or is it just because my copy has a typo or something? I'd just like to know.
I think Hermione Jean Granger has a better flow to it than had her middle name been printed as Jane. Plus, it's JKR's youngest child's middle name, I can imagine her slipping it in for a giggle


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  #35  
Old August 14th, 2007, 5:51 pm
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

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i get that she's a subtle character, and i guess i'm ok with that. it's just that i was so satisfied with the deep, rich way jk rowling wrote harry and ron.
I'm very surprised to read that, I personally have always - and I mean always - felt that Hermione was the most believable, the most convincing and true-to-life character of the entire series. But I guess different people have different perceptions to the same things.

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i love them because they had so much to overcome, and they did it. i think "pristine" is accurate. sure, hermione has weakness and insecurities, but these are merely glossed over, especially when you look at her next to harry, who has to overcome temptation and the pain of his past, or next to ron who has to overcome his feelings of inferiority, and whose flaws are, as you said, "brutally stark."
What past to overcome? Harry was never bothered by the Dursleys. He treats them with indifference and/or contempt, onec he learns he's a wizard. I didn't see him overcome anything. He never dwells on the supposed past, he never so much as mentions the Dursleys or his life before Hogwarts, and when he does, he does it with amusement.

Just because Hermione had a healthy childhood and no problems at home that doesn't mean she has no weaknesses or they are glossed over. Hermione is very troubled. She can't deal with her emotional issues. She tends to be overemotional and panicks. She can be very tactless and even insensitive to others' feelings if she needs to prove a point (Lavender and the bunny, the 'saving people thing', the Quidditch preventing house unity, etc.). She is so afraid of failure, she's practically unable to admit her weaknesses or when she has been wrong in something. She does enjoy rubbing it in when she has been proven right, because she just can't help herself. Aren't these serious and recognisable weaknesses? Or is it a weakness only when it stems from a problematic childhood?

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i mean, ron's learning experiences are always quite painful. and harry has to struggle - heck, he has to DIE - to gain the kind of wisdom he does at the end of DH. but hermione, it seems, is already there.
No, she isn't. She has breakdowns. She can't get over Ron's departure. She gives in to pressure just like Ron does, and even more than Harry does. She hasn't been portrayed to possess wisdom in the sense that Dumbledore did or that Harry achieved in the end.

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don't get me wrong, hermione's amazing. but i LOVED jk for writing harry and ron with such obvious flaws...because they both had to work so hard to overcome these flaws. both were incredibly satsifying character journeys.
I'd say Hermione's flaws are VERY obvious. What is more, I personally think she's the most changed character. Look at Hermion is PS, when she nags, meddles in others' business, intends to tell on people and lectures everyone. Si she the same in DH? A far cry, I would say. She did grow up, just like Ron and Harry, and I think it's been very nicely shown throughout the books, as a process, step at a time.


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Old August 14th, 2007, 6:20 pm
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

Nice analysis Yoana. I think that Hermione's "flaws" are out in the open - and they do affect her judgement at times. In DH, however, she did exercise some awareness and self-control regarding them - she mentioned that she was still considering the birds, when she was listening in without Ron and Harry noticing.

Hermione also was amazing skill-wise in DH - her tricks at the Lovegood house were top-notch, and she was showing several times that Ron's pragmatism had rubbed off.

And, I enjoyed the turnaround of the SS/PS line, too


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Old August 14th, 2007, 6:31 pm
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

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In DH, however, she did exercise some awareness and self-control regarding them - she mentioned that she was still considering the birds, when she was listening in without Ron and Harry noticing.

Hermione also was amazing skill-wise in DH - her tricks at the Lovegood house were top-notch, and she was showing several times that Ron's pragmatism had rubbed off.
Yeah, well, to be completely honest, I did notice that and it did bother me a little. It felt as though she was a tool sometimes. She was a little bit too convinient at times, don't you think? I admit I was a ttensy bit annoyed by that, but Hermione is still my favourite character, as she was at the very beginning, when I first met her in PS.


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Old August 14th, 2007, 6:36 pm
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

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Yeah, well, to be completely honest, I did notice that and it did bother me a little. It felt as though she was a tool sometimes. She was a little bit too convinient at times, don't you think? I admit I was a ttensy bit annoyed by that, but Hermione is still my favourite character, as she was at the very beginning, when I first met her in PS.
Perhaps...it's more believable coming from her that she'd be able to pull off mid-air apparition, summon the horcrux books, and heal Ron's arm than it would be for Ron to have done any of those (no offense to Ron, of course).

The one that Ron and Harry should have known, though, was the "touch memory" or whatever it's called. I didn't find it believable that Hermione supplied that particular bit of info. It played as funny in the book, but the realism factor was a bit lower.


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  #39  
Old August 14th, 2007, 6:37 pm
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

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Hermione also was amazing skill-wise in DH - her tricks at the Lovegood house were top-notch, and she was showing several times that Ron's pragmatism had rubbed off.
I agree, the way she held things together at the Lovegoods' was phenomenal, I was actually a little open-mouthed at her explanation of all of it. Added to the fact that she managed to Disapparate with Harry visible and Ron hidden under the Cloak, while falling through empty space.
Come to think of it, her turn at being Bellatrix also left me pretty impressed, she bore up amazingly even when she knew she was suspected of being an imposter.
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And, I enjoyed the turnaround of the SS/PS line, too
I know, that was such a moment


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  #40  
Old August 14th, 2007, 6:42 pm
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Re: Hermione Granger: Character Analysis

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Originally Posted by chparadise View Post
The one that Ron and Harry should have known, though, was the "touch memory" or whatever it's called. I didn't find it believable that Hermione supplied that particular bit of info. It played as funny in the book, but the realism factor was a bit lower.
Not really, as she tried to read everything she could about flying before their first flying lesson in PS. And then she gave harry "Quidditch Through the Ages", which I assume she had read. But then again, Harry had read it too. Perhaps she knew it from History of Magic?


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