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"separated by a common language"



 
 
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  #121  
Old November 13th, 2007, 10:27 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by ginger1 View Post
The most amazing day? When your son stops calling you Mummy, and starts using your Christian name. He stops being a child, you stop being a parent. You start being friends.
I don't know of anyone who does that, it's always Mum and Dad, even as adults.


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  #122  
Old November 13th, 2007, 10:36 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

As interesting as this conversation is, it's not the topic of the thread.
Was anyone else in the US surprised to see the phrase "figure of eight" instead of "figure-eight" in Deathly Hallows?


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  #123  
Old November 13th, 2007, 11:08 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by ginger1 View Post
The most amazing day? When your son stops calling you Mummy, and starts using your Christian name. He stops being a child, you stop being a parent. You start being friends.
That seems pretty unusual to me...your child calling you by your first name. And from my parent's example, I don't think you ever stop being The Parent, no matter how friendly you and your kids are. My mom will always be a mom to us first, a friend second. What age do you mean when your son starts calling you by your name?? I've always been taught that it is disrespectful to call an adult by their first name unless they ask you to.


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  #124  
Old November 13th, 2007, 11:27 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Topic, please.


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  #125  
Old November 14th, 2007, 10:31 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by Pegasus View Post
Was anyone else in the US surprised to see the phrase "figure of eight" instead of "figure-eight" in Deathly Hallows?
You don't say "figure of eight" over there? I didn't know that.

In England, Mummy and Daddy are pretty universal for small kids, changing to Mum and Dad for older kids and adults. Mummy and Daddy are considered babyish.


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  #126  
Old November 14th, 2007, 5:35 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by mac_attack View Post
That seems pretty unusual to me...your child calling you by your first name. And from my parent's example, I don't think you ever stop being The Parent, no matter how friendly you and your kids are. My mom will always be a mom to us first, a friend second. What age do you mean when your son starts calling you by your name?? I've always been taught that it is disrespectful to call an adult by their first name unless they ask you to.
I call my Mum and Dad by their first name sometimes. I also call other adults by their first names except teachers.


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  #127  
Old November 14th, 2007, 6:40 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

In the US is there the same difference between a University and a College as there is in the UK? College just seems to be a more widely used term than university in the US.


  #128  
Old November 14th, 2007, 6:51 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

In the States, College generally refers to schools which do not grant post-graduate degrees (ie, Master's or Doctorates), while a University grants Masters and Ph.D.'s. However, I do know of schools which grant post-graduate degrees (Boston College comes to mind) which call themselves "colleges". So it can get confusing.


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  #129  
Old November 14th, 2007, 7:01 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Do American people not just say "college" in reference to higher education? Even if they did go to somewhere which did grant post-grad degrees, do they not say that they're at college?


  #130  
Old November 14th, 2007, 7:07 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Technically it's as chparadise said, but in just common vernacular college is used in place of university. "I'm in college" "going to college" etc. I've never heard anyone over here say "I'm in university" or "I'm going to university". That's only clarified if people ask what particular school you go to, then it's always "a university". I don't really know how or why that difference came about, the Brit way certainly makes sense


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Last edited by kala_way; November 14th, 2007 at 7:16 pm.
  #131  
Old November 14th, 2007, 8:04 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Do Brits not refer to University as "school"?

I asked a guy if he was back at school yet, meaning University. And he said no...that he was in University, not school. Even in college, I still say school or class.


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  #132  
Old November 14th, 2007, 8:17 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

(From U.S.) I'm going back to school in January. I also talk about going back to college. The name of the place is Brigham Young University. So yes, in our culture, college is a pretty generic term.


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  #133  
Old November 14th, 2007, 8:25 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

(A Brit) no school is either primary or secondary school. University and college are totally different to school. We don't say "class" either, those were in school. We have lectures, labs, seminars, tutorials.


  #134  
Old November 14th, 2007, 8:46 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

That's strange to me. We're always in class here. (U.S.) Even in college, it's still "I have to get to class." We have lectures and seminars in class, usually lectures, and generally it's only called 'lab' if the class is a science course. Even then, it's most commonly "I had a lab in class today." Tutorial isn't really used at all. At least not that I've heard.


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  #135  
Old November 14th, 2007, 11:10 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by 8m57w6 View Post
That's strange to me. We're always in class here. (U.S.) Even in college, it's still "I have to get to class." We have lectures and seminars in class, usually lectures, and generally it's only called 'lab' if the class is a science course. Even then, it's most commonly "I had a lab in class today." Tutorial isn't really used at all. At least not that I've heard.
At my school, the University of Southern California, a notation of "lab" on a schedule of classes just meant that it was an extended period of time (generally between 2 and 4 hours, I think) that was to devoted to hands-on kinds of stuff -- it could be a traditional science lab, but it could also refer to time in a computer lab for a computer animation class, time in studio for an art class, or time using the cameras and lights for a film class.

The other designations for class types on the schedule of classes are usually: lecture, discussion, lecture-discussion, and lecture-lab.

But all of these are still generally called "going to class". Unless it's a science lab, or sometimes a computer lab, then it's often called "going to lab"... and sometimes an art student or an "archi-torture" (architecture) student might say that they're "going to studio".

USC schedule of classes --> http://web-app.usc.edu/soc/term_20081.html


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  #136  
Old November 15th, 2007, 3:29 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Hm...in America one calls a sweet candy. Then what do the British people call sweets? Candy too?


  #137  
Old November 15th, 2007, 4:00 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Actually, I think it's the Brits that call them 'sweets'.


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  #138  
Old November 15th, 2007, 4:25 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Oh so British people call candies sweets? OK...now I know. British call them sweets and American call them candies... English muffins are different too right? We had English muffins the other day and they tasted like bread! I always thought muffins only meant cakes. So what do British call the normal kind of muffins? Cup-cakes? (Psst sorry for me keeping on askin' about food...because I keep getting confused about them...)



Last edited by MC2456; November 15th, 2007 at 4:28 am.
  #139  
Old November 15th, 2007, 9:49 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by MC2456 View Post
Oh so British people call candies sweets? OK...now I know. British call them sweets and American call them candies... English muffins are different too right? We had English muffins the other day and they tasted like bread! I always thought muffins only meant cakes. So what do British call the normal kind of muffins? Cup-cakes? (Psst sorry for me keeping on askin' about food...because I keep getting confused about them...)
Muffins are bread things like this, that you normally eat toasted with butter and jam. The cake things we call cupcakes or American muffins.


  #140  
Old November 15th, 2007, 11:28 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by chparadise View Post
In the States, College generally refers to schools which do not grant post-graduate degrees (ie, Master's or Doctorates), while a University grants Masters and Ph.D.'s. However, I do know of schools which grant post-graduate degrees (Boston College comes to mind) which call themselves "colleges". So it can get confusing.
So do you have any places of further education rather than higher education?


 
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