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Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?



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  #41  
Old August 14th, 2009, 2:53 am
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

I definitely enjoy a couple of fantasy series that are aimed at children. I think there's absolutely nothing wrong with reading something that's recommended for a younger age group. Some stories can be enjoyed by adults as well as children.


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  #42  
Old August 14th, 2009, 8:11 am
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

I keep a good balance reading general fiction, I'm working my way through BBC's Top 100 Books Everybody Must Read type of lists but I go back to Meg Cabot and the Princess Diaries Series every few months, they just make me happy!

And how can it not be okay to read something that makes you happy?


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  #43  
Old August 18th, 2009, 7:42 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

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Originally Posted by Kanksha View Post
I keep a good balance reading general fiction, I'm working my way through BBC's Top 100 Books Everybody Must Read type of lists but I go back to Meg Cabot and the Princess Diaries Series every few months, they just make me happy!

And how can it not be okay to read something that makes you happy?
Yep. I find that there's nothing wrong in terms of reading stuff that makes you happy . If someone else doesn't like it -- too bad, I say . They're not the ones in charge of what books that you read -- you are.

@ Remus: So true there. In fact, there are times when you can go back to a book that you've read as a child and find something there that you didn't notice before. And those are the kind of books that I like most.


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  #44  
Old August 25th, 2009, 2:38 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

My advice is:

Look at the age the book says it's aimed at, then ignore it. If you think the book sounds like a good read, then read it. It doesn't matter if it's meant to be for a 6 year old, a 16 year old or a 60 year old. If it interests you, go for it.
It's the only way you're going to discover what you like to read.


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Old August 26th, 2009, 2:25 am
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

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Originally Posted by Schlubalybub View Post
My advice is:

Look at the age the book says it's aimed at, then ignore it. If you think the book sounds like a good read, then read it. It doesn't matter if it's meant to be for a 6 year old, a 16 year old or a 60 year old. If it interests you, go for it.
It's the only way you're going to discover what you like to read.
That's generally what I do, Schlubalybub . If the book is good to read -- then so be it. If it makes you laugh and smile -- then more power to you. Books are meant to make you think, and to make you have some fun (depending on the book itself). In the end, that's what truly matters -- that you take something from the overall experience itself .


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  #46  
Old August 26th, 2009, 3:29 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

I don't think there's anything wrong with reading books aimed at younger audiences. I do it myself because I enjoy the books. I admit I've been trying to store my books that I don't read much anymore to make room for ones I do, but I still like to go back and read some of the books I enjoyed when I was younger. It takes me back to when I was introduced to that particular series of books like The Indian in the Cupboard series. I will always thank my third grade teacher for getting me into those books. I loved them.

Besides, my mom has been telling me about certain books that the kids read so I can read them too and see if I like them. I say if you like it, go with it. If people make fun of you for it, then they're narrow-minded and are just bitter.


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  #47  
Old August 26th, 2009, 4:17 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

If you enjoy the book, there's nothing wrong in it. I sometimes re-read some of my children books; and when new children appeared in my family, I was giviing them books for Christmas and such... and always reading them before.

And that's how I got to HP world... ;P


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  #48  
Old August 26th, 2009, 4:40 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

Of course.

Writing books for children and young adults is a highly skilled art form.

I still have many of my favourite childhood classics -- Laura Ingalls Wilder, E. Nesbitt, C.S. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia, L.M. Montgomery, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Mary Norton's The Borrowers, etc. -- and also quite a few books in the Young Adult genre.

E. Nesbitt and Frances Hodgson Burnett are particularly interesting: both women, both feminists, both rather unconventional and 'socialist' (especially Nesbitt, who was a Fabian), they wrote in the early 20th century and produced some of the best-loved works of English children's literature: The Railway Children, Five Children and It, Little Lord Fauntleroy, The Secret Garden, A Little Princess, etc. I absolutely adored all these books ...

Alan Garner's The Owl Service, a YA novel written in the 1960s, is one of the best fantasy novels ever written, IMO.

I've also read some Cynthia Voigt, an American author who writes in the YA genre. She's great. I loved Tree by Leaf.

Last year I read Linda Newbery's The Shell House and was tremendously impressed by it:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Shell-House-.../dp/0099455935

And then there is Kevin Crossley-Holland's fabulous, FABULOUS 'Arthur' series :

The Seeing Stone
The Crossing-Places
King of the Middle March
Gatty's Tale


I cannot recommend these highly enough.

http://www.kevincrossley-holland.com/


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  #49  
Old August 26th, 2009, 10:08 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

Aslong as you aren't harming anyone, if something makes you happy then why shouldn't it be ok? Who cares what other people think?
I like to be different. Am I cool? No. But am I cool with not being cool? Yes. Because Im just me, and I don't hurt or harm anyone so people can (and will) judge me but who cares.


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  #50  
Old August 27th, 2009, 12:05 am
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

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Originally Posted by Pearl_Took View Post
Alan Garner's The Owl Service, a YA novel written in the 1960s, is one of the best fantasy novels ever written, IMO.
A couple of years ago I found my childhood copy of Elidor by Alan Garner at my sister's house (she has a history of stealing my stuff ) and reread it - it was fantastic and I couldn't put it down.

My mother is very intolerant of adults reading children's books (but, then again, she considers all SF and fantasy to be "children's books", so you don't have to even read a real children's book to incur her wrath.) I just can't see why it annoys her so much - it's not hurting her and there are far worse things we could be doing! But even she is susceptible for some things - she borrowed my copy of Goodnight, Mr Tom by Michelle Magorian when I was teaching it, and absolutely loved it.

One of my friends used to go on at me no end about reading HP, saying "Aren't you ashamed to be seen in public with a children's book?" and now she's totally hooked on HP herself!


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  #51  
Old August 27th, 2009, 12:28 am
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
One of my friends used to go on at me no end about reading HP, saying "Aren't you ashamed to be seen in public with a children's book?" and now she's totally hooked on HP herself!
Ah, a friend of mine did that to me as well. Then he got into it as well. It's fun to see people discovering that just because a book is originally written for a younger audience, doesn't mean that an older audience can't enjoy it as well.


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  #52  
Old August 27th, 2009, 3:38 am
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

A high school classmate of mine used to belittle me for reading HP, but another classmate told him that the books aren't childish since people in their 80's have read them. That shut him up pretty quickly.


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  #53  
Old November 22nd, 2009, 4:56 am
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

Well, what about the Disney movies? They're supposed to be for young kids but they have lots of subtle jokes or double entendres and things in them that are amusing for adults but would go right over a kid's head


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  #54  
Old January 27th, 2010, 2:39 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

When I was in the 9th grade, my literature teacher (an extremely intimidating woman, I might add) noticed that I was reading a children's book. She called me out on it, in front the whole class, and I made up some cock-and-bull story about why I had it.
Now, I'm almost ten years older, and I wish somebody would call me out on all the children's books I read. The truth is, a good story is a good story. The language used in a book may be simpler (but not always. Some parents complain about the language used in the Junie B. Jones series, but isn't the use of the common vernacular what authors like Mark Twain are famous for?!), but a good story is a good story is a good story.
I happen to adore Percy Jackson, and Artemis Fowl, and Harry Potter, and the Sisters Grimm, and Narnia, along with just about anything written by Roald Dahl or Shel Silverstein.
After all, if older people are always trying to be "young at heart," why should we try to adjust our reading to be "more grown-up?" Books should touch you there - in the heart. And if they don't - well, then they're not very good, anyway.


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  #55  
Old January 28th, 2010, 7:19 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

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Originally Posted by UselessCharmMaster View Post
I sometimes re-read some of my children books; and when new children appeared in my family, I was giviing them books for Christmas and such... and always reading them before.
I'm the same way, and parents tell me I give great books. It isn't because I know, it's because I've previewed the story.

I am 38 and I just read The Westing Game. Bought it for myself. There are some books meant for YA that just didn't exist when I was younger, but they're quite good and worth reading. For example - The Giver by Lois Lowry. This is one of those books many 5th grade classrooms read now - but it wasn't written when I was in 5th grade, so I missed out on it. I'm glad I read it as an adult because it was an engaging story and prompted me to read some of the classic dystopian society books again (Brave New World and others).

My friend (also in her 30's) is on a kick to read all the Newberry medal winners - she emails me her favorite titles. The View from Saturday was so good even my 'I only read non-fiction' husband read it.

So yeah, what others are saying - a good story is a good story regardless of what age group it is targeted for.


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  #56  
Old January 29th, 2010, 11:42 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

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There are some books meant for YA that just didn't exist when I was younger, but they're quite good and worth reading. For example - The Giver by Lois Lowry. This is one of those books many 5th grade classrooms read now - but it wasn't written when I was in 5th grade, so I missed out on it. I'm glad I read it as an adult because it was an engaging story and prompted me to read some of the classic dystopian society books again (Braclassmates had read it before, as early as 4th grade. Our teacher was astove New World and others).
I'm in 8th grade and just read The Giver. As I am in a very advanced learning program, many of my nished when he discovered this. I was as well (I didn't join the program until 6th grade when I transferred into public schools, very wisely indeed). As some of my peers re-read it, they acknowledged 90% of the book's intentions went straight over their heads!This didn't surprise me at all. The book is very intellectual and I can't imagine any 10 year old fully grasping what Lois Lowry has to offer.

I guess it can be a fun read just for the suspense factor. That is what younger audiences get out of it. However, I tend to appreciate the deeper aspects. I think it can be compared very similarly to Lord of the Flies by William Golding, as far as appeal goes. There are shallow aspects such as survival (this example being moreso in Lord of the Flies) that keep young audiences and the masses satisfied, but there are also many intellectual, philosophical, and deep themes that run throughout both books that appease the critics and intellectuals. I believe these latter occurrences are the author's true intentions.


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  #57  
Old January 30th, 2010, 12:36 am
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

Well, if adults read books that were clearly prompted to adults, what would they be reading; Some psychological 'thiller' in first person that is too confusing and annoying to understand, some pathetic romance, some dry-cut mystery? Maybe, if they're lucky, they'll come across a story from a different culture or country and have a ball.

The thing is, children and YA books are just more open to anything. They take the standard cloth and rip it up, and do their own thing. That's why some of them standout so much.


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  #58  
Old January 30th, 2010, 9:26 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

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Well, if adults read books that were clearly prompted to adults, what would they be reading; Some psychological 'thiller' in first person that is too confusing and annoying to understand...
Some people, myself included, enjoy these intellectual, "confusing", and "annoying to understand" books.


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Old January 31st, 2010, 2:09 am
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

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Some people, myself included, enjoy these intellectual, "confusing", and "annoying to understand" books.
Of course; I didn't mean to suggest that all adult books were that way.
I meant it like people shouldn't look down on adults who read things prompted for 'children' when adult books can be too serious for them.


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Old February 3rd, 2010, 5:23 pm
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Re: Is it okay to still read books meant for younger audiences as an adult?

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The thing is, children and YA books are just more open to anything. They take the standard cloth and rip it up, and do their own thing. That's why some of them standout so much.
This is very true, there is a freedom with well written YA books that allows a story to be told without having it be totally overwritten. YA books tend to be shorter in length and sometimes the power of the story lies in what is not written.

I get annoyed by 'adult' books that are centered around a tragic event because it is often done in a way that makes me feel bad. I don't like to pity the characters I read about. I find that a lot of YA books are more about what the character does vs. an adult book that focuses on how a character feels.

Of course that is a total generalization based upon the books I have read lately.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ActingDude17 View Post
I'm in 8th grade and just read The Giver. As I am in a very advanced learning program, many of my classmates had read it before, as early as 4th grade. Our teacher was astonished when he discovered this. I was as well (I didn't join the program until 6th grade when I transferred into public schools, very wisely indeed). As some of my peers re-read it, they acknowledged 90% of the book's intentions went straight over their heads!This didn't surprise me at all. The book is very intellectual and I can't imagine any 10 year old fully grasping what Lois Lowry has to offer.
And I think that is the beauty of a book such as The Giver - the more life experience you have the more levels you can appreciate it on.


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