Login  
 
 
Go Back   Chamber of Secrets > The Writing on the Wall > Fiction

Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)



Reply
 
Thread Tools
  #1  
Old March 4th, 2008, 4:15 am
Isla Sofia  Female.gif Isla Sofia is offline
Bribery Queen
 
Joined: 3738 days
Posts: 712
Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

May it be known that I searched the forum profusely for a related thread, and nothing came up.

Personally, my favorite part of any work of literature, the part I am most critical of, and the part that determines my own endearment to said work of literature, is the characters, the humans in the story that bring it to life and usually act as narrators-- I must feel a connection to and interest in the characters to become truly engrossed in the story. While I love the mythical world JK Rowling has ingeniously created, and I think her system of magic and, plot structures, connections to mythology, and invention of magical animals, like the kneazle, and games, like Quidditch are all wonderful and engrossing, it is her characters, the witches and wizards she makes so complex and human that truly draw me into the story-- I post most often not in the wandlore threads, the plot holes threads, or the factual threads, but in the Legilimency threads, because my real pleasure lies in delving into the minds and emotions of the wonderful characters she has given us, through analyzing their lives, actions, and relationships with others.

So, this thread is all about discussing your favorite characters in other works of literature, whether they be fantasy stories, science fiction, realist works, children's books, etc. While no character in literature could ever be as dear to me as Sirius Black, there are several that I particularly love:

Jean Louise "Scout" Finch, from To Kill a Mockingbird: Scout is such a caricature of the girl I was at nine years old, so I could relate to her early on-- she's spunky, a bit short-tempered, tomboyish, and longs to understand the world around her. Her childhood innocence provides such a refreshing narrative in a classic novel, works of which are usually dominated by a male protagonist. Scout's tone is delightful to read, as she details her life with a childlike simplicity, complaining about trivial events like a history project at school, and yet emanates a deeper insight than almost all of the other characters in the novel-- one of my favorite parts of the book is when Scout complains that her teacher, who condemns Hitler for imprisoning and torturing the Jews in Europe, turns right around an discriminates against the African Americans in their Southern, 1935 town! Raised by her tolerant father Atticus, Scout's mind is unfettered by the prejudices and societal foolishness that runs so rampant in her town, and her stubborn questions, incited by a child's inability to "understand" the political matters of the day, are really the uncomfortable truths that the ignorant seek to ignore. I love Scout for her inner beauty, and her ability to see the good in Boo Radley and Tom Robinson, when so many others, blinded by hate, cannot. In a novel chock-full of political messages and conflicts, she reminds the audience, through her innocence and acute questioning, that the child's view of humanity is most often a credible one.

Sydney Carton, from A Tale of Two Cities: Sydney is Dickens' best creation, IMO, and I've read a great deal of Dickens' work. The beauty of Sydney's character is how he is transformed and redeemed, from a selfish, alcoholic lawyer, to a courageous, altruistic hero through the power of love. Sydney's love for Lucie Manette may have been obsessive, as he pined over her for years, but it was absolutely true and respectful, and his devotion to her went above and beyond merely dying to save her-- Sydney died to save Charles Darnay, the man who had taken the love of his life and the object of his deepest desires away, because what he wanted more than his next breath was for Lucie to be happy, and to live a full life with the man she loved, even if that man could not be him. Sydney was a deeply flawed, tormented man who felt latched to the world, imprisoned in his own body, but he was able to rise above his many struggles out of love for Lucie and die to bring a smile to her face, to ensure that she would live happily. Sydney's death scene is one of the most moving things I have ever read, in which he predicts that France, ripped apart by a horrendous cycle of violence, will rise up "from this abyss," and claims that "It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest I go to than I have ever known--" that was just exquisitely celestial.

Templeton, from Charlotte's Web: Templeton is a delightful character; without his snarky presence, I would have been overcome by the saccharine overtones in the novel and set it down immediately. Templeton is quite unpleasant, even mean, and sarcastic, but I couldn't help but laugh hysterically at his sullen humor, especially when the childish Wilbur didn't understand, and the philanthropic Charlotte scolded him. He certainly isn't admirable-- he never changes; at the end of the novel, he still hoards food and acts selfishly, but I think we got a glimmer of his goodness in the way he grudgingly cared for Wilbur and didn't want him to become bacon. Point blank, he's an interesting character, very ambiguous and a bit Machiavellian, and I love that in a children's novel.

Algernon Moncrieff, from The Importance of Being Earnest: How could one not love Algernon? Algernon is one of Wilde's genius characters in my opinion, in that, in novel brimming with triviality of senseless characters, Algernon may appear to be the most trivial and most silly of all, with his serious practice of "bunburying" (Creating a false identity for himself, to get out of social situations that he finds distasteful) and his deep analysis of muffins, but truly, he is the only character in the novel who possesses a working brain and a three-dimensional character, for while Cecily, Gwendolyn, Lady Bracknell, and Jack really believe the nonsense they utter (The novel is a satire about the triviality of the upper class during the time of immense class conflict in Britain), Algernon gives off the distinct aura of realizing the stupidity of the other characters and merely exploiting it to get what he wants-- money, self-satisfaction, and Cecily's hand, among other things. Algernon is a conniving charmer who knows how to cleverly manipulate others-- he knows he does wrong, and delights in his own selfish ingenuity. Like Templeton, he isn't a person I would want to associate with in real life, nor is he one whom I admire, but he made the story quite an interesting read, and his wrongdoing is the reader's guilty pleasure.

Elizabeth Bennett, from Pride and Prejudice: Elizabeth is my favorite type of female character-- spunky, independent, creative, and unwilling to conform to the "ladylike" expectations of Victorian Society. I loved the way she stood up so fiercely for her family and friends because she cared so deeply for others, and stood up to Mr. Darcy, even when she was utterly wrong about the man he truly was, because she had such a quick temper. In a world of shallow women like Caroline Bingely, and timid women like her sweet sister Jane, Elizabeth is wonderfully unique and unafraid to be strong and challenge the feminine expectations in society. Her journey of falling in love with Mr. Darcy, while simultaneously trying so hard to hate him, made for one of my favorite romantic tales of all time.

I'm sure I'll be back with more; meanwhile, I'd love to hear from all of you concerning your most beloved characters in literature, any type of literature.



Last edited by Isla Sofia; March 4th, 2008 at 7:11 pm.
Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old March 5th, 2008, 7:22 am
Beatifically's Avatar
Beatifically  Female.gif Beatifically is offline
Elvendork
 
Joined: 3900 days
Location: Central Perk
Age: 25
Posts: 2,183
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Great thread!

I would put Elizabeth Bennett, but you said it perfectly. I like her for all the reasons you do.

Atticus Finch from To Kill a Mockingbird
I can't really elaborated on why I loved his character because it's been so long since I've read that book. He's such an amazing father and I really admired him in the book. In a way, I learned a bit more about life in general because of him. One of my favorite quotes all time is by him, the one when he says "I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It's when you know you're licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what." I usually thought of courage as the bold, valiant kind but I never recognized the courage in going through with a task no matter what. I also loved his speech in the court - I got goosebumps. I was shaking like mad when I read about the discrimination, and Atticus' words elevated my spirits. I was also really touched when he thought his children were missing and how he got emotional when he thought they were missing. He's such an amazing character, how could I not love his character?

Gemma Doyle from A Great and Terrible Beauty
Gemma Doyle lives in the Victorian era in the novel by Libba Bray. I didn't realize it until now, but she's a lot like Elizabeth Bennett. If a person loves Gemma, I'm positive that the person will love Gemma as well. She lives in Britain during the Victorian era, the era that has high expectations of women, but Gemma is willing to ignore all of that. She develops feelings for an Indian, for goodness' sake! Indians were considered second-class citizens by British (). Gemma is stubborn and doesn't give up her morals. She has courage and isn't willing to let people walk over her. Though she may doubt her worth sometimes, she's willing to stick to her decisions till the very end. She was a bit strange in TSFT, but in the end she was a woman, a woman of strength and passion - someone I greatly admire.

I have some more I want to talk about, but I'll add it in a later post.


__________________

CoS and Pottermore sorted
You will never do anything in this world without courage.
It is the greatest quality of the mind next to honor.

- Aristotle

Specialises in awesome picspams.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old March 5th, 2008, 4:35 pm
Legalese  Female.gif Legalese is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 4196 days
Posts: 148
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Laura Ingalls in the "Little House" series of books by Laura Ingalls Wilder. The character "Laura" is part autobiographical and part fictional. The author, LIW, began writing the autobiographical children's series in the 1930s, when she was in her 60s. LIW got a lot of help and encouragement from her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane, who had been a professional writer for many years and was an amazing person in her own right. I admire Laura, both the character and the author, because she helped us see history through her eyes. Reading the LH books gives us a real idea of what it was like to be a child in the 1870s and 1880s on the American frontier. Also, Laura is spunky, brave, intelligent and "strong as a little French horse." She is not sugary sweet and well-behaved like her sister Mary. She dares to question her mother's attitude (common at the time) that Native Americans were "savages" and deserved to be driven off of their homelands. She teaches school at the age of 15 in an isolated, one-room claim-shanty-turned-schoolhouse, during a snowbound South Dakota winter, just to earn money to help send her blind sister to college. In 1885, she refuses to say the word "obey" in her wedding vows, because, as she tells her fiance, "I don't think I could obey anyone against my better judgment."

Samwise Gamgee in Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien. Most Tolkien fans know that Sam is the true hero of Lord of the Rings. Frodo was brave and wise, and his decision to accept the quest was certainly important, but Sam went along with Frodo, doing much of the work and not getting much of the glory (until much later when he became mayor of Hobbiton and a leading citizen of the Shire). Sam is not noble or elegant or high-born. He is a gardener, basically Frodo's servant (although this was largely glossed over in the movies). Sam's loyalty to Frodo never wavered, and he kept going even when everything seemed hopeless, even after Frodo had collapsed in despair. Sam found great strength within himself. "His will was set, and only death could break it." It's exactly the quality that beatifically remarked upon in reference to Atticus Finch, that to keep going even when you know you are beaten is the greatest courage of all.


__________________
Tolkien exploded: "What has it got to do with the story? Where is this place? Why emus? And what is the thing in the foreground with the pink bulbs?" When the reply came that the artist hadn't had time to read the book, and that the object with the pink bulbs was "meant to suggest a Christmas tree,' Tolkien could only answer: "I begin to feel that I am shut up in a madhouse."
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old March 6th, 2008, 12:34 am
pinkShark  Female.gif pinkShark is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 4028 days
Location: Middle Of Nowhere
Age: 24
Posts: 142
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Ally Love from the 'Ally's World' series by Karen McCombie.
These were the books that got me from age 10 up. Ally is so like me, worrying about anything and everything, not liking disappointing people, and generally a bit of a push over. From feeling bad for not standing up to the bossy girl to feeling completely average to liking boys, Ally's World did a lot for me, and were completely hysterical at the same time.

Carmen From 'The Sisterhood Of The Travelling Pants'
She was selfish, explosive, and with a heart of gold. What's not to love?

I'll probably post more later.


__________________
HuffleClaw

nerdfighter
i need to kick off and fly into the night
follow the red sparks and hold on tight
the higher we get the colder the wind whips in my face
and it feels like i'm breathing for the first time tonight


The stars are going out...the darkness is coming...
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old March 7th, 2008, 6:57 am
Spirit's Avatar
Spirit  Female.gif Spirit is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 5214 days
Location: Phoenix, AZ, USA
Age: 27
Posts: 1,447
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

In no particular order...

- Hyrum Graff from Ender's Game.
I liked this character because I found his sarcasm quite funny. Everything else was so serious throughout most of the book, so his sarcasm was something I looked forward to. He also had a bit of an internal conflict about how much he should manipulate Ender -- he did what he had to win the war, but he didn't like doing it a lot of the time and that made him loveable to me.

- Holden Caulfield from The Catcher in the Rye.
Although he was a tragic character, I found his sarcasm hysterical. He was always complaining about people and he was so judgemental of everyone he encountered. Often he thought badly of everyone he met, and the way he described the people he didn't like was comical.

- Victor from The Thief Lord.
I honestly don't even really remember why I liked this character, because I don't remember much about this book. I read it years ago. I think I must have found him amusing.

- Brom from Eragon.
I always love the mentor in every fantasy story, and he was Eragon's mentor. I really hated it when he died in this book and therefore didn't return in Eldest.

- Henry Cameron from The Fountainhead.
I liked this character mostly because he was funny. He was a bit crazy and dramatic. He was also the main character's mentor and he was unafraid to go against the grain of society. He stood up for what he believed in even though it caused most people to think very little of him.

- "The boy" from The Road.
I really liked this character because he was extremely courageous and he had an extemely strong sense of right and wrong. Even though the world had fallen apart around him, he was always concerned about doing the right thing. When he and his father found some food that people had stored away, the boy was reluctant to eat it because he was afraid it was stealing, even though they were both starving and the people were probably dead. He would also want to help any other person they came across, and once he even wanted to help a dog by giving it some food. He was a really sweet character.

- Calma from The Crimes and Punishments of Miss Payne.
I read this book when I was in the 10th grade and this character was also in the 10th grade. She would narrate the story as it was happening, and she mostly talked about her English class (especially in the beginning) and how ridiculous it was. I found a lot of her commentary hilarious because I could completely relate to what was being said. My 10th grade English class was probably the most ridiculous class I ever took.

- Simon from The Lord of the Flies.
Simon deeply represented human goodness. He was everything good, and his murder showed just how separated he was from the other boys on the island due to his strong sense of morality.

- Joshua from Joshua.
This character was perfect. Joshua was supposed to be Jesus walking around in modern times. He was perfect because the author portrayed him exactly as I picture Jesus would be. He was always kind and never angry unless he saw someone hurt another person, he was always humble, and he was accepting of all people. There was none of the "if you don't go to church, you'll go to hell" mentality and he was accepting of all religions.


__________________
"Think how it must be for all the kids who were 8 when Harry debuted in 'Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone' ... Those kids are now 18, and when they close the final book, they will be in some measure closing the book on their own childhoods."
~ Stephan King, July 2007

Last edited by Spirit; March 9th, 2008 at 9:39 am.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old March 7th, 2008, 2:09 pm
Pearl_Took's Avatar
Pearl_Took  Female.gif Pearl_Took is offline
Zonko's Employee
 
Joined: 3706 days
Location: The Shire
Posts: 3,634
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Great thread, LilyP!

Anne Elliot in Jane Austen's Persuasion
I am not a Lizzy Bennet, the life and soul of the party. I love Lizzy, but I am not her. I am more like Anne. Anne is, at the tender age of 26 or whatever, 'on the shelf', according to the social mores of Regency England. She is utterly confined by the limitations on women's lives of that period, about which Austen writes with such keen perception. She has also lost the great love of her life, Captain Wentworth, because as a naive 19 year old she was too easily persuaded by her friend and mentor, Lady Russell, to reject him because he would not be able to provide for her financially. Years later, Wentworth comes back into Anne's life and she is just as much in love with him as ever. The whole story is about love lost and found. Anne is highly intelligent, compassionate and a woman of great dignity and total integrity. She is worth ten of her foolish, selfish father and equally self-centred older sister. She is a quiet woman, full of humility, and self-effacing, but she gradually blossoms out of her shell. She quietly learns how to assert herself and firmly stands her ground against her family's snobbery and the pressures they place on her ... and she richly deserves her happy ending. She is probably my favourite out of all Jane Austen's heroines, and I love Austen's women.

Frodo Baggins in The Lord of the Rings by J.R.R. Tolkien
Frodo (whose name means 'wise') is the hobbit who loses everything. Whereas Sam Gamgee, the other hero in the story, and Frodo's devoted servant turned equally devoted friend, gets a fairytale ending (like the one Harry gets ), Frodo loses everything. Sam's Elvish title means: "Hope Unquenchable." Frodo's Elvish title means: "Endurance Beyond Hope." He too is another of those quiet introverts who I love so much - brave, wise, mature (a missing note in Frodo's characterisation in Peter Jackson's films, much as I love them) and far more perceptive, even spiritual, than your average hobbit. Frodo is also, intriguingly, the most modern of Tolkien's characters: the despair and oblivion that drowns Frodo at the end of the saga (his soul is permanently scarred by having borne Sauron's Ring) is very moving to read, and haunts the reader. One can only hope that he did get his happy ending when he chose to forsake the mortal lands and sailed West with the Elves.

Legalese, I too love Laura Ingalls dearly. She, and Anne Shirley, were my role models when I was a child! Laura also had the advantage of being a real person. I just loved her fire, her spirit and her independence - all combined with a deep love for her family.

Quote:
In 1885, she refuses to say the word "obey" in her wedding vows, because, as she tells her fiance, "I don't think I could obey anyone against my better judgment."
And I love Almanzo's reply to her: "I do not know any reasonable man who would ask his wife to obey him, nor any reasonable woman who would comply" or words to that effect.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old March 11th, 2008, 10:57 pm
crookshanks16's Avatar
crookshanks16  Female.gif crookshanks16 is offline
Fourth Year
 
Joined: 4472 days
Location: Upstate New York
Age: 28
Posts: 581
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

I also like Elizabeth Bennet from Pride and Prejudice, for the reasons that people have already said.

My favorite of all time would have to be Anne Shirley from Anne of Green Gables. When I was about 12, I wanted to be just like her. She's just the most amusing character. I grew up reading Anne of Green Gables and learned a lot from her mistakes. I think the character of Anne has had a lot of imfluence on my life. Somehow, without realizing it, she became incorperated into my everyday life. It's like I took away something when I read the books.


__________________
“That which Voldemort does not value, he takes no trouble to comprehend. Of house-elves and children’s tales, of love, loyalty, and innocence, Voldemort knows and understands nothing. Nothing. That they all have a power beyond his own, a power beyond the reach of any magic, is a truth he has never grasped.”

92% of teens moved on to rap music. If you're part of the 8% that rock out everyday, put this in your sig.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old March 13th, 2008, 10:06 pm
SusanBones's Avatar
SusanBones  Female.gif SusanBones is offline
Inconceivable!
 
Joined: 4801 days
Location: in a galaxy far, far away
Posts: 4,090
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

I am sure that I have some favorites, but I would have to think about it for awhile

I like Jane Eyre because she had enough integrity to leave Rochester when she found out that he was married. Not many women of that period would have the guts to do what she did.

I also like D'Artagnan from The Three Muskateers. He was the "brains" behind the group, and I always admired "brains".


__________________


avatar artwork by Ruth Sanderson
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old March 13th, 2008, 11:20 pm
LoonyMagic's Avatar
LoonyMagic  Female.gif LoonyMagic is offline
Beauxbatons Champion
 
Joined: 3899 days
Location: Dreaming
Age: 26
Posts: 1,899
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Oh so many!

O'Brien from 1984: He's just so sinister and I had a very clear image of him in my head from the very beginning. I liked how his character seemed to be a person of hope, but was actually just one of the bad guys.

Edward Cullen from Twilight: And not just because "OMG! He's my dream man! ", but because I really do just love reading about him. His insecurities make him all the better (although I would like to see them more obvious and apparent in the books and acknowledged by other characters). I can't wait for a book just from his perpective - I'll find it fascinating.

Er..that's all I can think of at the moment. I'll probably be back with some more.


__________________
Voted Noobie of the Year in The Hogsmeade Awards.

Writing Contest ~ CoS Graphics Contest ~ LoonyMagic's Icons ~ loonyabby_icons at LiveJournal
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old March 14th, 2008, 1:55 am
Fawkesfan1's Avatar
Fawkesfan1  Female.gif Fawkesfan1 is offline
Clumsy Interrupting Cheese Toupeé & Scrambled Eggs
 
Joined: 4545 days
Location: May spontaneously combust!
Posts: 7,573
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Quote:
Originally Posted by LilyPod View Post
May it be known that I searched the forum profusely for a related thread, and nothing came up.


Templeton, from Charlotte's Web: Templeton is a delightful character; without his snarky presence, I would have been overcome by the saccharine overtones in the novel and set it down immediately. Templeton is quite unpleasant, even mean, and sarcastic, but I couldn't help but laugh hysterically at his sullen humor, especially when the childish Wilbur didn't understand, and the philanthropic Charlotte scolded him. He certainly isn't admirable-- he never changes; at the end of the novel, he still hoards food and acts selfishly, but I think we got a glimmer of his goodness in the way he grudgingly cared for Wilbur and didn't want him to become bacon. Point blank, he's an interesting character, very ambiguous and a bit Machiavellian, and I love that in a children's novel.
I liked him as well, and he was one of my favorite book characters .

Aslan, from The Chronicles of Narnia: He was a brave character and I respected how he treated the children and all of the citizens of Narnia with a kind of dignity and respect . I admire that in a book character and in people in real life as well.

Reepicheep, from The Chronicles of Narnia: He was a brave mouse who did his best and did his part in the Battle for Narnia, and I truly respect him for all that he did do .

*will add more of my favorite book characters when I can remember more of them*


__________________

RIP Uncle Bob . 1933-2016 Thanks for everything and thanks for the memories. We love you and miss you.


Looking forward to seeing Mulder and Scully again in the new X Files episodes!

Sad about the upcoming closing of the forums, but I won't forget you guys, thanks for the memories!

Proud fan of the TV show, The X Files and proud shipper of Mulder and Scully!!

Last edited by Fawkesfan1; April 22nd, 2008 at 5:55 am.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old March 14th, 2008, 3:54 am
HouseStark  Male.gif HouseStark is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 3904 days
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 327
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Emperor Leto II from God Emperor of Dune-He ran the universe for 2000 years, and he was the most supreme intelligent being in existence, what more is there to say.

Tyrion Lannister from A Song of Ice and Fire-Excellent character. Theres just so many layers to him. The bitter, sarcastic exterior layer for being a dwarf in a family of beatiful nobles, the altruistic servant to the realm which may or may not be a cover for a selfish desire for power and revenge on those who looked down upon him, and the inner, vulnerable self that shows his disadvantage playing a game among giants.

Meursault from The Stranger-Completely emotionless. He's a being of pure logic and rationalism. Really interesting to try to see the world from that perspective.

Bean from Ender's Game and Ender's Shadow-His mental abilities were amazing. He always had a solution, yet he was content to play a background role because he understood that the Bugger War was not his fight to win.

The Narrator from Invisible Man-The way he manipulated people was just amazing.


Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old March 18th, 2008, 8:49 pm
theBrotherGrimm  Male.gif theBrotherGrimm is offline
First Year
 
Joined: 3605 days
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 29
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

I would say...

Dorothy Gale from The Wonderful Wizard of Oz because she is headstrong and different from the damsel in distress type heroines we most commonly know of today.

Lucy Pevensie from The Chronicles of Narnia because she is brave and always has faith


Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old March 18th, 2008, 9:34 pm
houseelf25's Avatar
houseelf25  Female.gif houseelf25 is offline
Fourth Year
 
Joined: 4640 days
Location: A dark and expensive forest
Age: 28
Posts: 697
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Elizabeth Bennet, for the reasons you all have mentioned. She's definately one of the best female characters ever created.
Aly of Pirates Swoop, from "Trickster's Choice" and "Trickster's Queen." She's insightful, strong, funny, and smart all at once.
I also love Nawat Crow from those books. He's such an interesting character, funny, childish, and loving without being annoying.
Alexander Perchov from "Everything is Illuminated," just because of the way his sections of the book are narrated. He's funny and (somewhat) innocent, and he provides a great contrast with Johnathan, who's very serious.
I know there are other characters that I love, but I can't think of any that aren't HP-related right now


__________________


Imagination is not only the uniquely human capacity to envision that which is not, and therefore the fount of all invention and innovation. In its arguably most transformative and revelatory capacity, it is the power that enables us to empathise with humans whose experiences we have never shared.-JK Rowling
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old March 18th, 2008, 11:33 pm
DeathlyH's Avatar
DeathlyH  Male.gif DeathlyH is offline
Defender of Dogs
 
Joined: 3989 days
Location: In a dream
Posts: 2,129
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Saint Dane (Pendragon novels)
Believe it or not, in this book I liked the villain more than the hero. I have never seen a person (real or fictional) who thinks as logically as he does. I mean, while he is trying to take over Halla, Bobby realizes that Saint Dane is evil. But why? Evil is a point of view. What if Bobby's ways of stopping saint Dane are really evil? Why should Bobby change the universe because of what he thinks is right? And it's what he keeps coming back to- the terror caused in Halla is from the people themselves. Saint Dane influences them, but they all make the choices themselves that hurt them in the future. If Halla is taking it's natural course with Saint Dane, then is Bobby messing it up? Will there be another Eelong, where interference destroyed a territory forever? I love the character of Saint Dane; he gives the villain's side of a story an incredible new perspective, something Voldemort or Sauran never gave. Then, we only see things from the hero's POV. But now, we can see why the villains do what they do: they believe it is right.


Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old March 19th, 2008, 1:52 am
DarkSphynx's Avatar
DarkSphynx  Female.gif DarkSphynx is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 4709 days
Location: England
Age: 26
Posts: 1,270
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Sam Gamgee.

Need I say more?


Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old March 19th, 2008, 3:48 pm
Fury's Avatar
Fury  Male.gif Fury is offline
Registered Animagus
 
Joined: 4853 days
Location: Hogwarts Grounds
Age: 34
Posts: 4,801
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Brom - Eragon
I loved this character and thought it was horrible when he died... way too early in the story for him to die!

Uncle Paton - Charlie Bone Series
One of the funniest and most well-written characters I have ever read about in any book. Just love this character.

Tasslehoff Burrfoot (Tas) - Dragonlance Series
Also a very funny character and the most enjoyable to read about in the humongous Dragonlance Series.


__________________
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old March 19th, 2008, 9:14 pm
DeathlyH's Avatar
DeathlyH  Male.gif DeathlyH is offline
Defender of Dogs
 
Joined: 3989 days
Location: In a dream
Posts: 2,129
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fury View Post
Uncle Paton - Charlie Bone Series
One of the funniest and most well-written characters I have ever read about in any book. Just love this character.
I love Paton! He is the coolest old uncle ever to appear in print! You know, I still swear he is adopted.

I should've mentioned this in my last post- Matthias, from Redwall. One of the greatest heroes I've ever read of. He's so innocent, yet at the same time a fierce warrior and nice person (mouse ). It realls shows that anyone can be a warrior or someone influential if they work hard enough. He is the man.


Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old March 19th, 2008, 10:50 pm
dweaselqueen's Avatar
dweaselqueen  Female.gif dweaselqueen is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 4085 days
Location: English Room, 206
Age: 28
Posts: 1,309
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Elizabeth Bennett-Pride and Prejudice for all the reasons mentioned. I love her spunk, her strength, her passion, and her mind. She's easily Austen's best heroine.

Saphira-Inheritance Cycle just because of her wit, power, and love for Eragon. Plus she's a dragon which is just too cool.

Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe-Anne of Green Gables Ok, I love them both. Anne and Gilbert are one of my favorite couples, and I love both characters so much.

Mia Thermopolis-Princess Diaries because she is much cooler in the books then the movies. The books have so much wit and truth to them that just don't come across in the Disney-fied movie (which I also enjoy, but the books are better).


__________________
Don't want to see you go
But it's not forever, not forever
Even if it was you know that I would never
Let it get me down
'Cuz you're the part of me that
Makes me better wherever I go
So I will try not to cry
And no one needs to say good-bye
Farewell CosForums
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old March 19th, 2008, 11:51 pm
LoonyMagic's Avatar
LoonyMagic  Female.gif LoonyMagic is offline
Beauxbatons Champion
 
Joined: 3899 days
Location: Dreaming
Age: 26
Posts: 1,899
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkSphynx View Post
Sam Gamgee.

Need I say more?
Aaaaw Samwise!! I completely agree. He's so loyal and often not the most intelligent, but his heart is in the right place. Without Sam, Frodo would have never made it.


__________________
Voted Noobie of the Year in The Hogsmeade Awards.

Writing Contest ~ CoS Graphics Contest ~ LoonyMagic's Icons ~ loonyabby_icons at LiveJournal
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old March 20th, 2008, 12:15 am
houseelf25's Avatar
houseelf25  Female.gif houseelf25 is offline
Fourth Year
 
Joined: 4640 days
Location: A dark and expensive forest
Age: 28
Posts: 697
Re: Your Favorite Literary Characters (Other than HP)

Quote:
Originally Posted by dweaselqueen View Post
Mia Thermopolis-Princess Diaries because she is much cooler in the books then the movies. The books have so much wit and truth to them that just don't come across in the Disney-fied movie (which I also enjoy, but the books are better).
Oh, I totally agree with you! She just seems so...real. That's one of my favorite things about Meg Cabot's writing, all of her characters seem like you could run into them on the street.


__________________


Imagination is not only the uniquely human capacity to envision that which is not, and therefore the fount of all invention and innovation. In its arguably most transformative and revelatory capacity, it is the power that enables us to empathise with humans whose experiences we have never shared.-JK Rowling
Reply With Quote
Reply
Go Back  Chamber of Secrets > The Writing on the Wall > Fiction

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 2:52 am.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Original content is Copyright © MMII - MMVIII, CoSForums.com. All Rights Reserved.
Other content (posts, images, etc) is Copyright © its respective owners.