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  #21  
Old October 7th, 2008, 11:31 pm
princessofmonks  Female.gif princessofmonks is offline
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Re: Agatha Christie

I haven't read any of her books, but they sound like the kinds of books I like. I'm going to have to pick up some. From the number of posts, looks like maybe I should start with Murder on the Orient Express and And Then There Were None. lol


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  #22  
Old October 8th, 2008, 12:04 am
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Re: Agatha Christie

I used to love visits to my aunt's house when I was a teenager, because she had a whole bookcase full of Agatha Christie, which sparked my lifelong passon for whodunnits. My favourite was probably The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, but I also love Nemesis and Sleeping Murder.

I don't read much Christie these days (Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine, Stephen Booth, Michelle Spring, Danuta Reah, Denise Mina are probably my favourite mystery novelists now), although I have got a collection of Miss Marple short stories that a friend bought me as a birthday present a few years back, which I regularly reread.

She's definitely hugely underrated, though. And I also think the whodunnit influence on HP is huge - it's what first attracted me to the series.


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  #23  
Old October 12th, 2008, 11:28 am
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Re: Agatha Christie

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
I used to love visits to my aunt's house when I was a teenager, because she had a whole bookcase full of Agatha Christie, which sparked my lifelong passon for whodunnits. My favourite was probably The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, but I also love Nemesis and Sleeping Murder.

I don't read much Christie these days (Ruth Rendell/Barbara Vine, Stephen Booth, Michelle Spring, Danuta Reah, Denise Mina are probably my favourite mystery novelists now), although I have got a collection of Miss Marple short stories that a friend bought me as a birthday present a few years back, which I regularly reread.

She's definitely hugely underrated, though. And I also think the whodunnit influence on HP is huge - it's what first attracted me to the series.
I think Agatha Christie's books are staple for every mystery lover.I'd classify it as "must-read".Miss Marple is a great charcter.Whoever thought an old woman who looks frail and brittle could crack the best of mysteries/murders and similar crimes?

Christie was very ingenous(read And Then There Were None and Why Didnt They Ask Evans, you'd know exactly what I mean) and definitely deserves the sobriquet "Queen of Crime"


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  #24  
Old October 12th, 2008, 12:01 pm
Fleur du mal  Female.gif Fleur du mal is offline
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Re: Agatha Christie

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
She's definitely hugely underrated, though. And I also think the whodunnit influence on HP is huge - it's what first attracted me to the series.
For me it was the same. The mystery-hunting was what got me interested in HP. I've always loved whodunnits, the red-herring identification, the picking up of clues. And Agatha Christie is definitely the author who got me into the whole business. I read anything from her that I could lay my hands on when I was a kid, and I still admire her technique. The only thing I'm mildly critical of (nowadays) is the comparably flat psychology of her characters.


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  #25  
Old October 13th, 2008, 12:04 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

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Originally Posted by Fleur du mal View Post
For me it was the same. The mystery-hunting was what got me interested in HP. I've always loved whodunnits, the red-herring identification, the picking up of clues. And Agatha Christie is definitely the author who got me into the whole business. I read anything from her that I could lay my hands on when I was a kid, and I still admire her technique. The only thing I'm mildly critical of (nowadays) is the comparably flat psychology of her characters.
That's true. And the casual snobbery and racism is a bit disturbing, too (although that was the times she was writing in).

I think, though, that in "literary" circles, character is often overrated and plot undervalued. The ideal, obviously, is to have both, but I'd rather have a book with a great plot and flat characters, than great characters and a flat plot.


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  #26  
Old October 13th, 2008, 12:54 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
That's true. And the casual snobbery and racism is a bit disturbing, too (although that was the times she was writing in).
I have the impression that pretty much all newer prints have been cleansed. Many translations clearly are, fortunately.

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I think, though, that in "literary" circles, character is often overrated and plot undervalued. The ideal, obviously, is to have both, but I'd rather have a book with a great plot and flat characters, than great characters and a flat plot.
ah, well. I think it's possible to have both. Patricia Highsmith, for example, developed great plots (Strangers on a Train is one of the best crimi plots I know) and multi-layered characters. Or my personal omnipresent example-for-every-good-thing, Eco's Name of the Rose. Brilliant mystery plot, wonderful characters.

Christie's greatest feat, imo, is her perfection of the red herring, while simultaneously enabling the reader to solve the mystery themselves. I believe she was even a member of that club of mystery writers that pledged to write 'fairly'. Sorry I forgot their name, but there really was such a club. She got nearly kicked out because of the Roger Ackroyd stunt, but she could prove that despite the unreliable-narrator-technique, she did not cheat the reader.


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Old October 13th, 2008, 1:53 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

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Christie's greatest feat, imo, is her perfection of the red herring, while simultaneously enabling the reader to solve the mystery themselves. I believe she was even a member of that club of mystery writers that pledged to write 'fairly'. Sorry I forgot their name, but there really was such a club. She got nearly kicked out because of the Roger Ackroyd stunt, but she could prove that despite the unreliable-narrator-technique, she did not cheat the reader.
Exactly.There was a huge furore over it.But then they voted on retaining Christie because she gave the readers their money and time's worth

Its also interesting-I read that the storyline of Roger Ackroyd was given to Christie by Lord Louis Mountbatten


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  #28  
Old October 13th, 2008, 8:46 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

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Originally Posted by Fleur du mal View Post
I have the impression that pretty much all newer prints have been cleansed. Many translations clearly are, fortunately.
I think that the N word and overtly anti-Semitic comments have been removed from modern editions of Christie, but you've still got racist undertones - villains are often described as hook-nosed and sallow-skinned... Blimey, so is Snape, isn't he?! I'd forgotten...No, it's much worse than that in Christie, there is a real sense in character descriptions that being foreign-looking, particularly in a Jewish or Middle Eastern sense, means you're untrustworthy, degenerate, or just plain evil. And working-class characters are frequently stereotyped as congenitally stupid and devious.

I can live with it, just as I can in GK Chesterton, Evelyn Waugh and other writers of the era, because you knwo they were brought up with it, but still...

Quote:
ah, well. I think it's possible to have both. Patricia Highsmith, for example, developed great plots (Strangers on a Train is one of the best crimi plots I know) and multi-layered characters. Or my personal omnipresent example-for-every-good-thing, Eco's Name of the Rose. Brilliant mystery plot, wonderful characters.
True, and that is the ideal. I do feel sorry for mystery writers, though, because they ofen face condescension and intellectual snobbery from "serious" writers who I think aren't really that great. And it really annoys me when writers try to make a virtue out of the fact that they couldn't be bothered to actually think up a plot, by boasting about how the book is "character-based".

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Christie's greatest feat, imo, is her perfection of the red herring, while simultaneously enabling the reader to solve the mystery themselves.
Absolutely!


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  #29  
Old November 7th, 2008, 1:51 pm
janblack  Female.gif janblack is offline
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Re: Agatha Christie

I haven't read any of her books but my friends keep nagging me to pick up some.... any suggestions??


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  #30  
Old November 7th, 2008, 1:56 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

Try Christie's masterpieces:

"The Murder of Roger Ackroyd"
"And then there were none"
"Murder on the Orient Express"


And my personal favourite:
"Why didnt they ask Evans?"- Brilliant book, yet perhaps her most under-rated novel, IMO.

I'm sure you'd like them all and you can of course ask for more, later


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  #31  
Old January 21st, 2009, 11:33 am
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Re: Agatha Christie

I used to love Agatha Christie when I was younger! I used to get those magazines about her that came with a book each issue, I have about 30 of her books in my room but I haven't read the majority of them. Oh well, they are there for me if I want them. My favorites are "And then there were none" and "Death on the Nile".


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  #32  
Old March 10th, 2009, 11:02 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

I think she's a brilliant writer; I haven't read all of her books yet, and these two are probably cliche favorites, but my favorites are Murder on the Orient Express and And Then There Were None. I should probably get around to reading more of them. They really are all so well-written and unbelievably clever.

Also, my favorite detective is Poirot.


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  #33  
Old May 1st, 2009, 7:52 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

I love her books. They are really great. The Crooked House is very chilling and is probably my favorite book written by her. Even though the characters involved are usually less, the chance of second-guessing her is very slim. I love Poirot.

Her mystery novels are the first I read in that genre and I am hooked onto it since then. I just can't seem to let go of the book till I reach the conclusion. She is really a timeless great!


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  #34  
Old June 9th, 2009, 8:56 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

Agatha Christie = God.

Books I have solved:
The Hollow.
Murder in Mesopotamia.
and two other I can't remember. :~

My favourite is The Hollow. <3 I am going to quote it in my novel's epigraph. And Then They Were None is said to be great, but my friend told me the end and I could not read it.


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  #35  
Old June 10th, 2009, 12:21 am
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Re: Agatha Christie

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My favourite is The Hollow. <3 I am going to quote it in my novel's epigraph. And Then They Were None is said to be great, but my friend told me the end and I could not read it.

You know, I didn't like The Hollow, at all. It is one of my least favourites. It seemed so obvious that Gerda did it, and that she was so much smarter than she pretended to be. It didn't help that I hated most of the characters, especially her husband, John and his mistress, Henrietta.

I was reading The Murder of Roger Ackroyd when I was at High school, and one of my friends picked it up, turned to the back, and read;
"In fact...Dr Sheppard!"
I refused to believe it and said so because he is the Narrator but as we all know....
So, yes, I was spoiled for the murderer.


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  #36  
Old June 11th, 2009, 4:15 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

Loved And Then There Were None.


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  #37  
Old June 12th, 2009, 1:14 am
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Re: Agatha Christie

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Loved Daddy's Little Girl

I thought I had the complete collection of her novels, short stories and plays, yet I have never heard of this? Which volume is it published in and what is the plot?


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  #38  
Old June 12th, 2009, 5:00 am
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Re: Agatha Christie

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Loved Daddy's Little Girl

I thought I had the complete collection of her novels, short stories and plays, yet I have never heard of this? Which volume is it published in and what is the plot?
Woops, completely wrong author! Daddy's Little Girl is Mary Higgens Clark. Sorry for the mistake. I don't know what I was thinking .


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  #39  
Old August 19th, 2009, 3:40 pm
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Re: Agatha Christie

I love dear Agatha. Don't ask me to decide between Poirot and Miss Marple. Love them both.


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  #40  
Old August 20th, 2009, 12:15 am
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Re: Agatha Christie

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Well I haven't read any of her books yet...But I always watch Poirot. It's brilliant.
That's me . I really love to watch Poirot when it airs on PBS. David Suchet does a brilliant job as the detective with the 'little grey cells' .

And I also watch Miss Marple from time to time.

I should really find the time to read some of her books though, since they seem to be nicely written.


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