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  #1461  
Old April 28th, 2012, 12:11 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

In the UK the cobbler mix doesn't have eggs in - I take it the US one does Melaszka?


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  #1462  
Old April 28th, 2012, 12:42 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Well, no, as it was a vegan recipe, but the consistency was sponge, rather than scone.


  #1463  
Old April 28th, 2012, 1:18 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
I've also got a US recipe for something called "cobbler" which is what I'd call an Eve's pudding - stewed fruit topped with sponge.
I'm intrigued, could you share the recipe? We used to eat cobbler as a kid and it was fruit on the bottom with a crumbled oat/butter/sugar topping on top, that was baked in the oven.


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  #1464  
Old April 28th, 2012, 1:52 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Thanks for the cobbler talk everybody. That was very helpful. I was trying to look it up on the internet, but was getting all sorts of strange things instead of a definitive answer.


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  #1465  
Old April 28th, 2012, 2:40 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by SnyderD View Post
I'm intrigued, could you share the recipe?
Sure - it was this one. Like I said, from my British perspective, the topping's too cakey to be a "cobbler", I'd call this an "Eve's" - although, strictly speaking, an Eve's should be apple.

Quote:
We used to eat cobbler as a kid and it was fruit on the bottom with a crumbled oat/butter/sugar topping on top, that was baked in the oven.
That sounds more like what we Brits would call a "crumble". I make it so often I can give the recipe from memory: rub 3 oz margarine or butter into 6oz flour with your fingers, add 3 oz sugar, then add half a cup of oats or nuts and some cinnamon or mixed spice, if you like. Pour on top of the stewed fruit base and bake in the oven for about 30-40 minutes at around 190 degrees.

What we would call a "cobbler" is stewed fruit with a scone topping (roughly 2oz of fat rubbed into 8oz of flour, a bit of sugar added, but then bound together with milk so it has a kind of bready texture when cooked - I'm told that a British "scone" is similar in texture to a US "biscuit", but I don't know if that's true, never having had the latter)



Last edited by Melaszka; April 28th, 2012 at 2:42 pm.
  #1466  
Old April 28th, 2012, 4:02 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
We'd probably call that a "plaster" (although we'd understand what a Band-Aid is)
I've heard that before, but it always slips my mind. I remember that the first time I read the part in HBP when Harry tells Kreacher and Dobby to stick to Malfoy "like a couple of wart plasters," I was confused. I think of plaster as a building material. But I assumed that meant some kind of bandage. There are a lot of little things in HP like that. I have the U.S. Edition of the books, but there's still a lot of British terms in there that can throw me for a loop. Like dressing gown. In the U.S. we call that a bathrobe or housecoat. Dressing gown made me picture a nightgown (dress-type thing that ladies and girls might wear to bed). So I had a hard time picturing Harry running around the school at night in girls' pajamas...
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In the UK, a vacuum cleaner is a "hoover" and we also use the verb "hoover" to describe what you do with it ("My carpet's dirty so I need to hoover it", "I haven't done the hoovering for over a week" etc)
While that's not a widespread generalization here (most people just call it a vacuum), I would definitely understand what you meant. Hoover's our most well-known brand of vacuum as well.
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A ballpoint pen is a "biro".
Interesting. We don't have a different name for a ballpoint pen. That's just a typical pen.
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Originally Posted by ignisia View Post
That sounds awfully familiar. I think we do have that in the US, but I've only ever seen it in those individual plastic packets at diners and breakfast places (like these), and it's always orange flavor.
Weird, I've never seen that before! I mean, I've seen the little containers of jelly/jam, but I've never seen ones with marmalade in them.

The descriptions of cobbler sound the same as the U.S. version. Usually peach, apple, or cherry. Delicious when topped with vanilla ice cream!

ETA: My mom usually makes the crumble kind of cobbler, but I have had the kind with the spongy cake stuff on top. I've also seen cobbler that are basically just a fruit pie with no bottom. All would be called by the same name in the U.S.



Last edited by GrangerHermione; April 28th, 2012 at 4:08 pm.
  #1467  
Old April 28th, 2012, 4:21 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by WelkinCooper View Post
Thanks for the cobbler talk everybody. That was very helpful.
Cobbler talk being a different thing from talking cobblers which is anything but helpful.


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  #1468  
Old April 28th, 2012, 6:07 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
I'm told that a British "scone" is similar in texture to a US "biscuit", but I don't know if that's true, never having had the latter)
Scones and biscuits do have a similar consistency but they taste very different.


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  #1469  
Old April 28th, 2012, 10:07 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Yup, Wab - from the original rhyming slang for 'cobblers awls'


  #1470  
Old April 29th, 2012, 1:23 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wab View Post
Cobbler talk being a different thing from talking cobblers which is anything but helpful.
It would depend on what the cobbler tells you, now wouldn't it? But it would be awfully rude to eat it after carrying on a pleasant conversation with it, I would think.

So, I understand that gooseberry cobbler exists in the UK too? Which is funny to me, since, when I mention it here in the U.S. to people, unless they are from the south, a lot of times they don't know what in the wide world of Merlin I'm talking about.

On a totally different subject...why are knickers called knickers in the UK? What's the derivation of that. I can understand panties, because it's like calling them small pants.


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  #1471  
Old April 29th, 2012, 1:43 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

There used to be an item of clothing called knickerbockers, which were loose round the, er, rear, and gathered in at the knees, so I guess it comes from that. But why they were called knickerbockers in the first place. Um ...


  #1472  
Old April 29th, 2012, 2:31 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by ginger1 View Post
There used to be an item of clothing called knickerbockers, which were loose round the, er, rear, and gathered in at the knees, so I guess it comes from that. But why they were called knickerbockers in the first place. Um ...
According to my dictionary, you're right, it is an abbreviation of "knickerbockers" and "knickerbockers" were named after Diedrich Knickerbocker, a name assumed by Washington Irving when he wrote "The History of New York" - I'm assuming they got that name because those kinds of breeches were what the original Dutch settlers of New York would have worn, but I don't know.

Both "pants" and "panties" were originally abbreviations of "pantaloons", another type of breeches, so there is no more logic to "panties" than there is to "knickers".


  #1473  
Old April 29th, 2012, 5:46 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by welkincooper
It would depend on what the cobbler tells you, now wouldn't it? But it would be awfully rude to eat it after carrying on a pleasant conversation with it, I would think.
I'm just going to slide in here before wab and explain that "talking cobblers" is slang for "talking rubbish".


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  #1474  
Old April 29th, 2012, 8:27 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by Overdose View Post
I'm just going to slide in here before wab and explain that "talking cobblers" is slang for "talking rubbish".
I'm just going to remind anyone who might be tempted to explain the origin of that phrase that this is a family-friendly forum!


  #1475  
Old April 29th, 2012, 8:58 pm
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
According to my dictionary, you're right, it is an abbreviation of "knickerbockers" and "knickerbockers" were named after Diedrich Knickerbocker, a name assumed by Washington Irving when he wrote "The History of New York" - I'm assuming they got that name because those kinds of breeches were what the original Dutch settlers of New York would have worn, but I don't know.
According to the book Toponymity, an Atlas of Words, by John Bemelmans Marciano, there was a revised edition of Irving's A History of New York that came out in England with illustrations done by George Cruikshank, and his rendering of the breeches worn by Dutch burghers reminded 19th-century British readers of women's underpants (those long, baggy ones that they wore back then) and they started referring to said underpants as knickerbockers as sort of a joke.


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  #1476  
Old April 30th, 2012, 3:20 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by ginger1 View Post
There used to be an item of clothing called knickerbockers, which were loose round the, er, rear, and gathered in at the knees, so I guess it comes from that. But why they were called knickerbockers in the first place. Um ...
I always wondered about that...in PS/SS, Dudley eats a Knickerbocker glory ice cream at the zoo. Is that a common kind of ice cream in the UK? Why is it named after knickerbockers? I thought that was strange when I first read it.


  #1477  
Old April 30th, 2012, 3:23 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Just wondered about knickers, as, a million years ago, when I was in high school, knickers were popular in the U.S.A. but they were knee-length pants like golfers wore, not underpants.


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  #1478  
Old April 30th, 2012, 7:28 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

Quote:
Originally Posted by GrangerHermione View Post
I always wondered about that...in PS/SS, Dudley eats a Knickerbocker glory ice cream at the zoo. Is that a common kind of ice cream in the UK? Why is it named after knickerbockers? I thought that was strange when I first read it.
It's a real treat of an icecream!

I can't find a definitive explanation of the name - the best offered is this:-


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knickerbocker_glory


  #1479  
Old April 30th, 2012, 11:31 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

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Originally Posted by WelkinCooper View Post
Just wondered about knickers, as, a million years ago, when I was in high school, knickers were popular in the U.S.A. but they were knee-length pants like golfers wore, not underpants.
These are probably what we would call "knickerbockers" (also briefly fashionable for women in the early 80s).

I think the explanation for the varying meanings of "knickers" is that both branches of English started using it as an abbreviation of "knickerbockers", but in the UK it became applied to women's undergarments at a time when they were voluminous, knee-length things, of approximately the same size and shape as those golfers' trousers, and continued to be associated with women's underwear, even when they shrunk to the current size.

ETA: Re "knickerbocker glory", I also found this discussion of the term, which suggests that "knickerbocker" was sometimes used as a synonym for "New Yorker" and thus the dessert may have been so-named to convey the metropolitan sophistication of New York.



Last edited by Melaszka; April 30th, 2012 at 12:00 pm.
  #1480  
Old May 6th, 2012, 6:14 am
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Re: "separated by a common language"

This could have gone in the F word thread but I think it is relevant here as it demonstrates the difference in the tolerance of swearing between the US and elsewhere.

IndependentMalcolm Tucker might call it an "omni-*******-shambles". Viewers watching The Thick Of It in the US were instead presented with a 30 minute Morse Code bulletin after the BBC “beeped” out the political satire’s notorious swearing.

BBC America beeps out swearing in The Thick Of It‎


Apart from making the show sound like it's been dubbed in morse, the baroque swearing is a big part of Tucker's character.

And it screens at midnight so I doubt there'd be too many viewers up at that hour who'd be mortally offended by language.


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