Login  
 
 
Go Back   Chamber of Secrets > Forum Archives > Non Harry Potter Archives

The Improve Your English Thread v3



 
 
Thread Tools
  #21  
Old October 3rd, 2006, 4:01 pm
arithmancer's Avatar
arithmancer  Undisclosed.gif arithmancer is offline
Assistant to Professor Snape
 
Joined: 4653 days
Location: The Hogwarts Boathouse
Posts: 7,937
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0

Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsMagic View Post
I dont know if this makes much of a difference either but i think most Brits(like myself) would us the word BLENDER for crushing up fruit and making smoothes or veg for soup!
a MIXER would be anything we use to Mix something ie a spoon or i would be more familiar using the word when asking for something to add to my Barcardi!
Yes, this is the same as the US English usage. Amazing...two words we can agree on!


__________________
The Sorting Hat says I belong in Slytherin.



“Death is the only pure, beautiful conclusion of a great passion.”-D. H. Lawrence

All was well.


Avatar by nerwende, signature art by sigune, used with permission.
Sponsored Links
  #22  
Old October 4th, 2006, 2:19 am
ominous ominous is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 5596 days
Location: Seoul
Age: 45
Posts: 306
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Desperate Housewives

Is it a common culture in the U.S. or the Britain that neighbors visit the sticken family and express their condolences to them after the funeral with foods they prepared and being in black? or it is a custom only in the wealthy white-dominated villages.


  #23  
Old October 4th, 2006, 4:30 pm
confutatis  Male.gif confutatis is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 4630 days
Location: Outer Slobovia
Posts: 329
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0

Quote:
Originally Posted by ominous View Post
In English, is there such an idiom "go to the house" meaning "killing someone"?
One of my colleague student said that she saw this in her dictionary.
I can't quite believe there is a such an idiom like this.
I've never heard that one. Here in the southern U.S., when someone says they are 'going to the house' or 'taking it to the house', they just mean they are finally going home.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ominous View Post
Desperate Housewives

Is it a common culture in the U.S. or the Britain that neighbors visit the sticken family and express their condolences to them after the funeral with foods they prepared and being in black? or it is a custom only in the wealthy white-dominated villages.
This is a very common custom in the U.S., at least in the southern states. It has nothing to do with race. We do have some customs that seem to be peculiar to us, such as pulling over to the side of the road and stopping when a funeral procession is passing. When I was a child it was the custom to have friends and neighbors sit up all night with the body of the deceased until the funeral. I don't really know why that was, other than respect. It is seldom done now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mugglebeki View Post
Most of the posters here are English speakers, but I've noticed that the majority of the Non-English speakers (people from France, Spain, Germany, South America) have less spelling errors.
Yes, our schools seem to have forgotten to teach students to spell, at least in the U.S. I have three children that went through the public school system, and things have really changed since I was in school. For one thing, teachers in the early grades are reluctant to correct spelling (except on spelling tests) as they feel it hinders the creativity of the student. From my observation in the college classes I teach, it doesn't get any better in the later grades, either! My students are surprised that I note and count off for spelling errors in their tests. As for the rules of English, many of us never actually learn them until we have to take a foreign language! I faked my way through English all the way through high school and college. If, like me, a student reads a lot, he or she will know how a sentence should be constructed without really knowing why.


  #24  
Old October 4th, 2006, 6:13 pm
BublGumPnkHar's Avatar
BublGumPnkHar  Female.gif BublGumPnkHar is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 4833 days
Location: Cruising the world's oceans
Age: 74
Posts: 1,026
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0

Quote:
Originally Posted by confutatis View Post


Yes, our schools seem to have forgotten to teach students to spell, at least in the U.S. I have three children that went through the public school system, and things have really changed since I was in school. For one thing, teachers in the early grades are reluctant to correct spelling (except on spelling tests) as they feel it hinders the creativity of the student. From my observation in the college classes I teach, it doesn't get any better in the later grades, either! My students are surprised that I note and count off for spelling errors in their tests. As for the rules of English, many of us never actually learn them until we have to take a foreign language! I faked my way through English all the way through high school and college. If, like me, a student reads a lot, he or she will know how a sentence should be constructed without really knowing why.
I don't know how old you are and it's probably not important, but when I was in school (I graduated in 1962 in Michigan) we were taught spelling through 6th grade and grammar up through 9th grade (15 years old). Of course, you could be "marked down" for misspelling and grammar through all the high school years. I was an English Major in college but never saw any reinforcement of the "rules of grammar" (but I was only there for two years). That's why I love this thread, it focuses on my "old love". I could never stick to writing whole long passages, but I did like writing short pieces/anedotes/memories.

Grammar was important enough in high school that I used to proofread my older brother's essays/writing assignments before he turned them in; he tried to teach me math (a lost cause once I was past Algebra I), he received more out of the exchange of help than I did.

Sometimes phonetics aren't enough to get you the correct spelling, but it can "get you in the ball park" and the other person can usually understand. I have always been a good speller and I am not afraid to use the dictionary (but, of course, minimal spelling tools help there, too).

Text messaging has made the spelling problem worse, if possible; especially when it is used in these forums. I would hate to be a person trying to read this "English" as a non-primary language.



Last edited by BublGumPnkHar; October 4th, 2006 at 7:17 pm.
  #25  
Old October 4th, 2006, 9:27 pm
ItsMagic  Female.gif ItsMagic is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 4725 days
Location: Sunny Scotland!
Age: 34
Posts: 116
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Quote:
Originally Posted by ominous View Post
Desperate Housewives

Is it a common culture in the U.S. or the Britain that neighbors visit the sticken family and express their condolences to them after the funeral with foods they prepared and being in black? or it is a custom only in the wealthy white-dominated villages.
Hmm...in Britain we will send condolence cards and go round if they are friends or family, but its not tradition to give food but if you go to any funeral is always respectful to wear black unless the family has had wishes from the deceased not to.(there are many diverse religions in Britain though and they might be different- i'm protestant)


__________________

Its All About The Magic
Harry+Ginny
Ron+Hermione
Its a truth universally acknowledged that Harry Potter ROCKS!
  #26  
Old October 5th, 2006, 6:07 am
SGosling  Male.gif SGosling is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 5116 days
Location: India
Age: 55
Posts: 1,100
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0

Quote:
Originally Posted by ItsMagic View Post
I dont know if this makes much of a difference either but i think most Brits(like myself) would us the word BLENDER for crushing up fruit and making smoothes or veg for soup!
a MIXER would be anything we use to Mix something ie a spoon or i would be more familiar using the word when asking for something to add to my Barcardi!
Where I come from, and it must be an age thing A mixer is a party to promote sociability and communal activity. A sort of a “get to know new people” dance.


__________________
MIB 2010
  #27  
Old October 5th, 2006, 2:32 pm
confutatis  Male.gif confutatis is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 4630 days
Location: Outer Slobovia
Posts: 329
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0

Quote:
Originally Posted by SGosling View Post
Where I come from, and it must be an age thing A mixer is a party to promote sociability and communal activity. A sort of a “get to know new people” dance.
Yes, that is also called a 'mixer' in the U.S. - but so is a hand-held device used with beater attachments used to mix cake batter.


  #28  
Old October 5th, 2006, 8:08 pm
ItsMagic  Female.gif ItsMagic is offline
Second Year
 
Joined: 4725 days
Location: Sunny Scotland!
Age: 34
Posts: 116
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0

Quote:
Originally Posted by SGosling View Post
Where I come from, and it must be an age thing A mixer is a party to promote sociability and communal activity. A sort of a “get to know new people” dance.
Sorry ive never heard that expression before, not up here in Scotland anyway
What we would call a 'get to know new people' dance would be a 'Social' or 'Social Dance'


__________________

Its All About The Magic
Harry+Ginny
Ron+Hermione
Its a truth universally acknowledged that Harry Potter ROCKS!
  #29  
Old October 5th, 2006, 8:23 pm
Masterfroggy  Male.gif Masterfroggy is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 5380 days
Posts: 1,278
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3.0

Quote:
Originally Posted by confutatis View Post
Yes, that is also called a 'mixer' in the U.S. - but so is a hand-held device used with beater attachments used to mix cake batter.
that would be a "Balloon whisk" or a electric whisk.


__________________
Masterfroggy
26/04/64 - 14/03/2011
MIB
  #30  
Old October 6th, 2006, 9:38 am
ominous ominous is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 5596 days
Location: Seoul
Age: 45
Posts: 306
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Desperate Housewives

With what this mom did threaten her kids?
What is the center?
Who is the elf?
(Please understanding my poor listening skill. There might be somthing wrong with my script.)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mom: Stop it! Stop it! Stop it! Stop it! No!
You are going to behave today. I'm not gonna be humiliated in front of the neighborhood. And just you know how serious I am?

Son 1: What's that?

Mom: Center's cellphone number.

Son 2: How did you get that?

Mom: I know someone who knows someone who knows an elf. And if any of you acts up, so help me, I would call center and I would tell him you want socks for Christmas. You willing to listen up? (?)

Sons: (Agree)


  #31  
Old October 6th, 2006, 10:00 am
Moriath's Avatar
Moriath  Female.gif Moriath is offline
MODLY CREW
 
Joined: 4705 days
Location: Neverwhere
Posts: 7,036
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

The center is actually Santa, meaning Santa Claus. Elves work for him.


  #32  
Old October 6th, 2006, 2:16 pm
ominous ominous is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 5596 days
Location: Seoul
Age: 45
Posts: 306
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Oh! It struck me just after I posted this one.
I just forgot you guys rarely pronounce "t" sound.
Like "center" is pronounced "cenner" or "international" like "innernational".

Thank you Madron anyway.


  #33  
Old October 6th, 2006, 7:00 pm
karatekid's Avatar
karatekid  Male.gif karatekid is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 4531 days
Location: England
Age: 25
Posts: 766
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Don't know bout everyone else, but I pronounce the 't'...


__________________
and I always get confused, because in supermarkets they turn the lights off when they want you to leave, but in discos they turn them on.
and it's always sad to go, but it's never that sad, because there's only so many places you're guaranteed of getting a hug when you leave.
and then on the way home, it always seems like a good idea to go paddling in the fountain, and that's because it IS a good idea.
and we're just like, how rousseau depicts man in the state of nature:
we're undeveloped, we're ignorant, we're stupid, but we're happy

[los campesinos]
  #34  
Old October 6th, 2006, 7:47 pm
arithmancer's Avatar
arithmancer  Undisclosed.gif arithmancer is offline
Assistant to Professor Snape
 
Joined: 4653 days
Location: The Hogwarts Boathouse
Posts: 7,937
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Quote:
Originally Posted by karatekid View Post
Don't know bout everyone else, but I pronounce the 't'...
I think this is more true of US pronunciation (Desperate Housewives is after all a US TV program).

Though it seems to me that that initial confusion ('center' for 'Santa') comes more from another quirk of pronunciation, leaving a final 'r' silent. ('centuh' for center).


__________________
The Sorting Hat says I belong in Slytherin.



“Death is the only pure, beautiful conclusion of a great passion.”-D. H. Lawrence

All was well.


Avatar by nerwende, signature art by sigune, used with permission.
  #35  
Old October 6th, 2006, 8:02 pm
Freaky's Avatar
Freaky  Female.gif Freaky is offline
Zonko's Employee
 
Joined: 4652 days
Location: Mixed weather Devon, UK
Age: 42
Posts: 3,081
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Quote:
Originally Posted by ominous View Post
Oh! It struck me just after I posted this one.
I just forgot you guys rarely pronounce "t" sound.
Quote:
Originally Posted by zgirnius View Post
I think this is more true of US pronunciation (Desperate Housewives is after all a US TV program).
It can be a British way of talking, it's a more lazy way though - definitely not the Queen's English. Some people say war-uh instead of water.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zgirnius View Post
Though it seems to me that that initial confusion ('center' for 'Santa') comes more from another quirk of pronunciation, leaving a final 'r' silent. ('centuh' for center).
I think some American accents when saying "santa" can pronounce it almost "sehntah" (midway between e and a sound). Very confusing!


__________________
Mrs Weasley set the potion down on the bedside cabinet, bent down, and put her arms around Harry. He had no memory of ever being hugged like this, as though by a mother. The full weight of everything he had seen that night seemed to fall in upon him as Mrs Weasley held him to her. His mother's face, his father's voice, the sight of Cedric, dead on the ground, all started spinning in his head until he could hardly bear it, until he was screwing up his face against the howl of misery fighting to get out of him
  #36  
Old October 6th, 2006, 8:08 pm
karatekid's Avatar
karatekid  Male.gif karatekid is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 4531 days
Location: England
Age: 25
Posts: 766
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Oh yeah, that makes sense. I know I sometimes say 'better' without the 't's .
I have a question. might you ever say, 'I had had...'?
e.g. I had had the flu...
It came up in a Latin lesson; I knew you could say 'I have had...', but I wasn't sure about this. Also, what is the past tense of 'panic'? Would you write 'I panicked'? Itjust didn't look right .


__________________
and I always get confused, because in supermarkets they turn the lights off when they want you to leave, but in discos they turn them on.
and it's always sad to go, but it's never that sad, because there's only so many places you're guaranteed of getting a hug when you leave.
and then on the way home, it always seems like a good idea to go paddling in the fountain, and that's because it IS a good idea.
and we're just like, how rousseau depicts man in the state of nature:
we're undeveloped, we're ignorant, we're stupid, but we're happy

[los campesinos]
  #37  
Old October 6th, 2006, 9:25 pm
Masterfroggy  Male.gif Masterfroggy is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 5380 days
Posts: 1,278
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Quote:
Originally Posted by karatekid View Post
Oh yeah, that makes sense. I know I sometimes say 'better' without the 't's .
I have a question. might you ever say, 'I had had...'?
e.g. I had had the flu...
It came up in a Latin lesson; I knew you could say 'I have had...', but I wasn't sure about this. Also, what is the past tense of 'panic'? Would you write 'I panicked'? Itjust didn't look right .
Had had is perfectly fine.
Had had is the past perfect form of have when it is used as a main verb to describe either experiences or actions.
“She sacked him before he had had a chance to explain his behaviour.”
“If she had had children later in life, she would have been a better mother”

It’s often abbreviated to ‘d
“If she’d had children later in life, she would have been a better mother”
“If I'd had another ten minutes, I would've finished the examination paper.”
Sometimes it is possible to rearrange the words so it is easier to read

“Had she had children later in life, she would have been a better mother”
“Had they had any savings they didn't need, they would've re-paid their son's student loan.”

Panicked, may not look right, but it is.


__________________
Masterfroggy
26/04/64 - 14/03/2011
MIB
  #38  
Old October 6th, 2006, 9:34 pm
karatekid's Avatar
karatekid  Male.gif karatekid is offline
Fifth Year
 
Joined: 4531 days
Location: England
Age: 25
Posts: 766
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Ah, okay. Thanks . Seeing it in an abbreviated form makes it clearer.


__________________
and I always get confused, because in supermarkets they turn the lights off when they want you to leave, but in discos they turn them on.
and it's always sad to go, but it's never that sad, because there's only so many places you're guaranteed of getting a hug when you leave.
and then on the way home, it always seems like a good idea to go paddling in the fountain, and that's because it IS a good idea.
and we're just like, how rousseau depicts man in the state of nature:
we're undeveloped, we're ignorant, we're stupid, but we're happy

[los campesinos]
  #39  
Old October 7th, 2006, 2:10 am
ominous ominous is offline
Third Year
 
Joined: 5596 days
Location: Seoul
Age: 45
Posts: 306
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

The problem comes from the different sounding system between two languages.

Bad vs. Bed

For native speakers, it's no big deal. But for us Koreans, it is hard to differentiate those two words because in the Korean, there is only one vowel for this case. So, for us, Bad and Bed are fundamentally pronounced same.

The same goes to Base vs. Vase. We have no vowel equivalent to "v" sound. One of the hardest thing to master English.




Last edited by ominous; October 7th, 2006 at 2:13 am.
  #40  
Old October 7th, 2006, 6:20 am
Masterfroggy  Male.gif Masterfroggy is offline
Sixth Year
 
Joined: 5380 days
Posts: 1,278
Re: The Improve Your English Thread v3

Quote:
Originally Posted by ominous View Post
The problem comes from the different sounding system between two languages.

Bad vs. Bed

For native speakers, it's no big deal. But for us Koreans, it is hard to differentiate those two words because in the Korean, there is only one vowel for this case. So, for us, Bad and Bed are fundamentally pronounced same.

The same goes to Base vs. Vase. We have no vowel equivalent to "v" sound. One of the hardest thing to master English.

In English English, as apposed to American English Base and Vase, sound nothing like each other.
In the part of the UK where I come from:
Base rhymes with face or mace
Vase rhymes with Mars, jars or cars


__________________
Masterfroggy
26/04/64 - 14/03/2011
MIB
 
Go Back  Chamber of Secrets > Forum Archives > Non Harry Potter Archives

Bookmarks


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 8:00 am.


Powered by: vBulletin, Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Original content is Copyright © MMII - MMVIII, CoSForums.com. All Rights Reserved.
Other content (posts, images, etc) is Copyright © its respective owners.