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UK Politics v2.



View Poll Results: Which party will get your vote?
Conservatives 4 23.53%
Labour 4 23.53%
Liberal Democrats 9 52.94%
Green Party 0 0%
UKIP 0 0%
Regional (Scottish, N. Ire, Welsh Parties) 0 0%
Voters: 17. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
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  #1  
Old April 5th, 2010, 11:51 pm
Overdose  Undisclosed.gif Overdose is offline
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UK Politics v2.

I thought it would be a good idea to have a seperate thread for election matters, with general workings of the government and outside plays left to the UK politics thread.

Anyway, to kick it off here's some questions.

1) Do you intend to vote in the general election, if so (if this is not too impolite) who are you most likely to vote for and why?

2) Labour have just narrowed their lead to 3 points. Electoral maths however, notes that constituency boundries are now in favour of the Conservatives. How much of a chance do you think there is of a Labour victory?

3) Is a hung parliament possible, and if so is it even desirable?

4) What are your thoughts on the upcoming televised debates, a first for the UK?

5) How would a Conservative/Labour/Liberal Democrat victory affect you locally?

6) How would the above affect the nation nationally?

7) What is your wishlist for the next government?


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  #2  
Old April 6th, 2010, 10:09 am
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

Just out of interest from an outsider, is there a good place (apart from their own websites) where you can find the views of the three main parties on the major issues listed together?

How do the Lib Dems stand on Europe btw?


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  #3  
Old April 6th, 2010, 10:49 am
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

How the parties stand on the issues.

Here you go, from the BBC.

Where they stand.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hes
How do the Lib Dems stand on Europe btw?
The Liberal Democrats are probably the most optimistic regarding European integration, they plan to take Britain into the single currency and tend to work more closely with other liberal EU members. Labour I believe have said that the UK may enter into the Eurozone but only after certain economic conditions have been met. ALso Labour, unlike the Liberals have no intention on joining the no-passport zone.

The Conservatives are far more eurosceptic, leaning against a federal Europe on the grounds that the EU is not democratic, generally beurocratic and pass directives by unfunded mandate. They move more for individual sovereignity and would prefer the EU to act simply as a trading block.

Full manifestos are expected to be released by the end of today, until then party websites are good for policy. There will no doubt me more full analysis of individual parties once manifestos have been officially released.

1) Do you intend to vote in the general election, if so (if this is not too impolite) who are you most likely to vote for and why?


I will be voting for the Conservative Party. Whilst I am not a social conservative, I simply do not trust Alistair Darling or Gordon Brown with running the economy. I am not entirely bought: the defecit was fairly inevitable but so far stimulus seems to have done little. Darling also has hardly any credible plan for cutting back spending or regulation on small business. Moreover I am opposed to heavy government intervention in the long run in regards to creating a new fledgling economy based on what resources we have. We are of course heavily reliant on the city, yet still the 6th largest manufacturer in the world with one of the most open labour markets. This is something we can be rightly proud of and something that I do not want to see in the hands of a fourth-term government.

I'm not entirely pessimistic about a Labour victory. Labour have been great on a lot of issues and Brown is a gifted economist however, the government is tired and has gone from being a cautious but optimistic force to a gang of statist interventionists, passing knee-jerk reaction laws to every tiny quibble and I think it's time that they are gone.

I am a great admirer of Michael Gove too and I think it is time for a more radical approach to education. I think that in the next 5 years, if he is allowed to put some of his ideas into practice he will do a lot of positive work. Certainly better than the dreadful Ed Balls.

2) Labour have just narrowed their lead to 3 points. Electoral maths however, notes that constituency boundries are now in favour of the Conservatives. How much of a chance do you think there is of a Labour victory?

OK I've just found that this is only in the Guardian poll. However, generally the Conservatives are only up by 7-10%. This is significant because the Conservatives need to win an additional 143 seats to even have a majority. I think that many underestimate how vast a swing the Tories actually need to gain power. Labour could lose a fair few seats and still hold a majority.

3) Is a hung parliament possible, and if so is it even desirable?


Certainly it's possible, though I do not think that it is particularly desirable. Whilst markets and credit ratings are not as skeptical about the UK as the Tories would like the electorate to think, I don't think that a compromise government will do a great job. It will probably be short-lived and damaging.

4) What are your thoughts on the upcoming televised debates, a first for the UK?


Cautiously looking forward to these. Hopefully it won't just be a bunch of soundbites like Question Time.

5) How would a Conservative/Labour/Liberal Democrat victory affect you locally?


We are supposed to be a safe seat however, at the last bielection the Lib Dems actually came pretty close to winning. They've done well in other suburbs e.g. Vince Cable in Twickenham and to be honest locally, I think they might provide a breath of fresh air.

Both the Liberals and the Conservatives favour a less top-down approach to local government and this, I am all for.

6) How would the above affect the nation nationally?


I am not looking forward to Tory Europe policy. It is the one issue that has me umming and ahh-ing about the next election. Yes the EU must be more democratic. Yes it must be more accountable and less beurocratic but it is so much easier to work from within the system. When it comes to big multilateral issues like law & order, defence and global issues the EU is a club worth being a major part of.

7) What is your wishlist for the next government?


A less intrusive government which encourages enterprise, fuel independence and healthy attitude to social issues. Britain is not broken and I would prefer the Tories to stick to their 'hug a hoodie' leader. I do support their plan for local enterprises and the plan for Trust schools and education reforms.

I want a positive government to engage with the people in this troubled time. I want a government that will work to rebuild the strength of the Pound, reform welfare and streamline the national health service into a less beaurocratic institution. I am prepared to tolerate the loss of public sector jobs in this, with the remit that the government is as quick to encourage growth as it is to simply pull out.


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Last edited by Overdose; April 6th, 2010 at 11:57 am.
  #4  
Old April 6th, 2010, 2:35 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

Quote:
1) Do you intend to vote in the general election, if so (if this is not too impolite) who are you most likely to vote for and why?
I'll vote for the Liberal Democrats. Labour have been mediocre for 13 years, have acted recklessly in their foreign policy, have failed to curb corporate excesses and recklessness and the Conservatives haven't demonstrated that they will be any better. David Cameron always seems clueless and out of touch to me.

Quote:
2) Labour have just narrowed their lead to 3 points. Electoral maths however, notes that constituency boundries are now in favour of the Conservatives. How much of a chance do you think there is of a Labour victory?
It's possible that people will get "election-day jitters" and choose the incumbants rather than risking a new government. But I doubt it.

Quote:
3) Is a hung parliament possible, and if so is it even desirable?
Possible yes, desirable yes, if it means the parties have to work together and build a consensus. Undesirable if it means nothing is agreed upon and nothing gets done.

Quote:
4) What are your thoughts on the upcoming televised debates, a first for the UK?
Interesting, but a little too much of a "gimmick". But I'll watch.

Quote:
5) How would a Conservative/Labour/Liberal Democrat victory affect you locally?
Quote:
6) How would the above affect the nation nationally?
Labour/Tory = Status quo or worse, Lib-Dem = Probable improvement.


Quote:
7) What is your wishlist for the next government?
Reduction in public housing rents, abolition of eviction in all cases except anti-social behaviour, reduction in council tax, restoration of student grants, abolition of student debt and "loans", crackdown/hard regulation on credit card companies, debt collection agencies, mortgage providers, banks, financial sector etc..., cuts in NHS/council administration, withdrawal from Afghanistan, nationalisation of railways, bus services, and water companies, staying OUT of the single European currency and distancing the UK from the EU, independent foreign policy to that of the United States, establishment of an English Parliament, reduction in school class sizes, removal of private sector from NHS in regards to cleaning, legalisation of same-sex marriage, legalisation of drugs, water/gas/electricity meters for all homes, compulsory NHS service and patient care for all dentists practicing in the UK, increased alertness regarding the Falklands, movement towards federalisation in the Home Nations with an eye to the eventual dissolution of the UK down the line, investment in development in alternative energy and technologies.....to name but a few.


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Last edited by AldeberanBlack; April 6th, 2010 at 3:08 pm.
  #5  
Old April 6th, 2010, 2:50 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

I would like to see (but doubt as colonial affairs are generally well off the radar): full repatriation and support of Chagos Islanders who wish to return and, on the other hand entirely, dismantling Pitcairn as a civilian outpost.


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  #6  
Old April 6th, 2010, 3:04 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

1) Do you intend to vote in the general election, if so (if this is not too impolite) who are you most likely to vote for and why?


Yes! It's my very first general election as a UK citizen. I'll vote - and if I can manage it there'll again be a poster on my house telling people to vote, because my biggest worry is a low turnout.

COnsidering the situation in my constituency I am going to vote LibDem. There is a (remote!!) chance that Labout will actually lose to the LibDems in Swansea West, and I think locally a change would be good after all those decades.

I like the Lib Dems generally - they are my kind of green and pro-Europe and (to my mind) the most clued-up about the economy. Gone are the days when their policis were completely impossible because they didn't expect to have many seats anyway. I like that.


2) Labour have just narrowed their lead to 3 points. Electoral maths however, notes that constituency boundries are now in favour of the Conservatives. How much of a chance do you think there is of a Labour victory?

Hmmm..... I have no idea. My hunch is (and that could be totally wrong) that given the weird electoral system and all factors, chances for an outright majority for Labour or Conservatives are about even, with a fairly high probability of a hung parliament or a majority that's so small (under five seats) that it basically isn't workable.


3) Is a hung parliament possible, and if so is it even desirable?

I think that at the moment it's quite possible. I'd rather like it, because I think the LibDems are sensible and I'd like their voice heard. I'd also like to see a serious discussion of electoral reform, which would almost certainly happen if the LibDems get to play kingmakers.

4) What are your thoughts on the upcoming televised debates, a first for the UK?

Fairly indifferent. I don't have a TV and migth watch them online if I get round to it and if it's possible. I expect little, although I might enjoy the show. None of the three top politicians are interesting enough, IMHO< to promise a really good 'show', and I don't expect much more than soundbites on the issues.


5) How would a Conservative/Labour/Liberal Democrat victory affect you locally?
6) How would the above affect the nation nationally?


I fear that South Wales would not fare well under a Tory government. The area consists of all sorts of interests that don't do well under the Tories, and oif course, the Tories don't do well there, electorally, either.

As a university lecturer I fear all of them (the LibDems least), since university policies in the UK have been pretty short-sighted for a long time. But our business has gone to hell in a handcart under Labour, with its typical obsession with targets and so forth. As an Academic, I think I can only wish them out of power.

As far as the economy is concerned, I think a Labour/LibDem coalition would be most beneficial. I don't trust the Tories with the economy.




7) What is your wishlist for the next government?

I don't know.... I have wishs, but they wouldn't be realistic with the budget crisis we have got.

Let's see.
  • I want a friendlier attitude to Europe.
  • I want a more realistic attitude to immigration: I believe that it is basically a good thing, and should be handled openly - we need to get away from the destructive policies which result from humouring the Daily Mail.
  • (Blue Sky stuff) I want to see drugs legalised and controlled differently. This would lower crime rates, IMHO. I think it's crazy that our attempts to protect drug-users from self-inflicted harm leads the same people to inflict harm on large numbers of innocent citizens. This ought to stop.
  • I want a more liberal attitude towards universities. The government currently regulates us so much, and changes the rules so often, that one simply can't work properly or plan for the futue properly. ANd satisfying the bureaucracy for all those regulations takes up almost more time than our proper job.

[/quote]


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  #7  
Old April 6th, 2010, 4:17 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

1) Do you intend to vote in the general election, if so (if this is not too impolite) who are you most likely to vote for and why?

Yes, I do intend to vote. I will probably vote Lib Dem, mostly for tactical reasons (I live in a fairly safe Tory seat, I don't trust the Conservatives, and the Lib Dems are the only party which has any chance of unseating them here), but also because I think they have some decent, credible policies, in some respects more radical and left-wing than New Labour, while still rooted in credible economic thinking. If we had PR, I'd probably be going with my heart and voting Green (despite reservations about whether their policies would actually work in the real world), but as it is, I'd be wasting my vote.

2) Labour have just narrowed their lead to 3 points. Electoral maths however, notes that constituency boundries are now in favour of the Conservatives. How much of a chance do you think there is of a Labour victory?

I don't think it's going to happen, but then again, no-one thought Major would win in 1992....If there are big gaffes on the part of the Tories between now and then, it just might happen. Also, if there's an extremely low turnout (which there might be - some people think the expenses scandal will make more people anxious to vote, but it may have the opposite effect - people so distrustful of all politicians, they just can't be bothered with it), it could lead to a surprise result.

Generally, though, I think this is a pretty depressing election - unlike when Blair and Thatcher were elected, there doesn't seem to be a groundswell of popular support for any party - I feel most people are gritting their teeth and looking to the least bad option.

3) Is a hung parliament possible, and if so is it even desirable?

Possible, yes. As to desirable, I'm not sure. In the current economic climate, probably not. But if it means the LibDems get more power in a power-sharing deal, it could shake things up a bit in a positive way.

4) What are your thoughts on the upcoming televised debates, a first for the UK?

Not sure. At a time of real political apathy, we really need something to engage the person in the street in politics, make them want to vote, and give them the information on which to base their choice. But, on the downside, it could mean politics gets reduced to who can come up with the cutest soundbite and wear the prettiest tie.

5) How would a Conservative/Labour/Liberal Democrat victory affect you locally?

Not sure.

6) How would the above affect the nation nationally?

I really don't trust the Tories with public services. Or not to impose an intrusive, moralising social agenda, trying to socially engineer people's private lives. Or with Europe. Or not to politicise the police. I may be unfairly holding onto prejudices from the Thatcher/Major era and maybe (with the exception of a few backbenchers and grassroots obsessives) they have changed and modernised, but so far the evidence I have seen has, at best, been ambiguous.

I'm also a bit worried about letting George Osborne loose on the economy, but that's less of a worry, as if he's not panning out, I'm sure that Cameron will replace him with someone more experienced, anyway.

7) What is your wishlist for the next government?

I'm deep into fantasyland here and I know that this is not a wish list for a country with a humungous national deficit, but:

* real commitment to funding the NHS and introducing reforms which don't treat the health service like it's any other market organisation like a baked bean factory. I'm not totally against applying free market principles to public services, but it has to be done very carefully, bearing in mind their special nature, I don't think it's ever a silver bullet, and I think most of the "reforms" under Thatcher/Major (e.g. Care in the Community, contracting out of hospital cleaning services, expansion of health service management to ridiculous levels) were disastrous.
* a green transport policy which prioritises public transport over road-building and does not include an extra runway at Heathrow. Oh heck, since this is a wish-list, let's renationalise the trains and buses.
* abolish SATs and league tables and replacing them with simple, teacher-administered diagnostic tests, for individual parents', students' and teachers' information only. Remove the "internal market" elements to the education system which give schools, exam boards and universities an incentive to dumb down (because the more people who choose their courses and the more people who get good grades, the more money they get).
*in all public services, find a simple, non-time-consuming way of recording information, so public bodies are accountable but don't waste hours of their time filling in forms.
*legalise gay marriage and stop making exemptions for religious groups from gay rights laws
*by all means end the anomaly which makes cohabiting couples worse off than non-cohabiting ones, but please, please, please don't use tax laws to try to bludgeon us down the aisle. (a) it won't work - do you know anyone whose choice of whether to marry or not came down to tax? (b) it's intrusive and discriminatory.
*stop passing laws and making other decisions as kneejerk reactions to big media stories. I'd so love a Government which has the guts to be unpopular in the short-term and trusts us to judge them on long-term results, instead of being dictated to by the Sun and the Mirror.
*if public sector pay freezes and job losses have to happen, they should start at the top and MPs and senior executives should lead by example


  #8  
Old April 6th, 2010, 5:05 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

1) Do you intend to vote in the general election, if so (if this is not too impolite) who are you most likely to vote for and why?


I do intend to vote in the General election. I have no excuse not to vote as the polling station is just round the corner from where i live. I'm on the fence at the moment in regards to who I'm going to vote for. It will be one of these two - Liberal Democrats or Labour.

The Tories have not really done anything to show that they deserve to win the election. I'm quite skeptical about David Cameron's make over of the Tories.


2) Labour have just narrowed their lead to 3 points. Electoral maths however, notes that constituency boundries are now in favour of the Conservatives. How much of a chance do you think there is of a Labour victory?

A very slight chance of a labour victory. Something would have to go very wrong for David Cameron between now and polling day for Labour to win.

3) Is a hung parliament possible, and if so is it even desirable?

Given the expenses scandal, i think a Hung Parliament is quite possible. Is it desirable ? Yes. Because it will force politicians of all flavours to work together and not least the Party Leaders.

4) What are your thoughts on the upcoming televised debates, a first for the UK?

Long overdue as we don't get to vote directly for the Prime Minister.
I doubt ITV, BBC or Skynews will actually pick anything other than generic questions for the leaders. But I'm open to surprises (biggest surprise would be Gordon Brown's clunking fist smashing David Cameron's cool persona out of the water).

5) How would a Conservative/Labour/Liberal Democrat victory affect you locally?


Well it depends on how fast and aggressive each party is with the impending cuts on Government spending. The biggest impacts locally will probably be seen in local NHS Services and Local Government. I don't believe any of the Parties will ring fence spending on the NHS.

6) How would the above affect the nation nationally?


It again depends on how big the cuts are in Government spending. Some areas may do better than others.

As far as the parties go, i think the Liberal Democrats are somewhat closer to what the British people want. Labour is well off course. And the Tories ? I don't believe they are in tune with the mood of the nation. As i fully expect the Tories to unleash policies that are at odds with what people want. That's if they still hold their core beliefs.

7) What is your wishlist for the next government?

I have a big wish list, but here are a few -

1. Proper Reform of the Mental Health Act.
2. Reform of NHS Mental Health services.
3. Reform of the Benefits system.
4. For the Target culture in the public services to be reigned in, to allow the core public service workers to do their respective jobs properly.
5. For the budget deficit to be dealt with effectively. and for the UK to live
within it's means. But that means we need to again look at our place in
the world and where the UK fits in.


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  #9  
Old April 6th, 2010, 11:21 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

Quote:
Originally Posted by Melaszka View Post
I don't think it's going to happen, but then again, no-one thought Major would win in 1992....If there are big gaffes on the part of the Tories between now and then, it just might happen. Also, if there's an extremely low turnout (which there might be - some people think the expenses scandal will make more people anxious to vote, but it may have the opposite effect - people so distrustful of all politicians, they just can't be bothered with it), it could lead to a surprise result.


My hunch is that a low turnout is more likely to be in favour of the Tories - the party out of power is more likely to have a higher percentage of voters who are keen to vote. While a party which has got tired by being in government for years will find it harder to get its voters out - especially if that party has disappointed its base.





Kevin, Mel - great wish lists. Mine is just incongruous in comparison. There isn't a single point especially on Mel's list that shouldn't also be on mine.


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  #10  
Old April 7th, 2010, 12:09 am
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

1) Do you intend to vote in the general election, if so (if this is not too impolite) who are you most likely to vote for and why?

Yes I will be voting. Haven't decided for who to vote yet, but Lib Dems is looking the most likely at the moment. At the national level I'd much rather see Brown stay on than have Cameron and the Tories back in, but I'm not too keen on our MP. She has a majority of 6,500 (18%) here but that was largely due to the popularity of the former Labour MP. Tories are second at the moment but Lib Dems made large gains from both parties last time. It'll probably be quite close which makes a nice change to being a safe Labour seat, though Wyn Griffiths was very well though of.

2) Labour have just narrowed their lead to 3 points. Electoral maths however, notes that constituency boundries are now in favour of the Conservatives. How much of a chance do you think there is of a Labour victory?

Of hanging on to a majority? Highly unlikely. Of being able to form a government with the LibDems, probably the most likely option at this point.

3) Is a hung parliament possible, and if so is it even desirable?

Absolutely possible and I think it might actually be a good thing. A party with a huge majority can push through pretty much anything, but a hung parliament will force them to co-operate.

4) What are your thoughts on the upcoming televised debates, a first for the UK?

I don't know a great deal about them, but giving the party leaders the opportunity to debate major issues with millions watching is surely a good thing?

5) How would a Conservative/Labour/Liberal Democrat victory affect you locally?

Not as much as it would elsewhere due to the continued Labour/Plaid Cymru control of the Welsh Assembly Government.

6) How would the above affect the nation nationally?

I don't think that the LibDems have any chance of winning a General Election while we persist with First Past the Post, but I'm sure they'll again take an increase of votes. As others have said though I think they may well have the best policies.

A Tory government would probably mean large spending cuts and an increase in unemployment.

7) What is your wishlist for the next government?

Others have made some points that I agree with, in particular I see little reason not to adpot the Euro, and I agree that a reform of the benefit system is needed. While being a welfare state is in general a good thing, I think we take it too far. Certainly there should be support for people who are unable to work, unfortunately under the current system there are many who choose not to work and are living comfortably from that.

I think in general though I agree with the above two wishlists.


  #11  
Old April 7th, 2010, 2:02 pm
Overdose  Undisclosed.gif Overdose is offline
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

Quote:
Originally Posted by melazska
* abolish SATs and league tables and replacing them with simple, teacher-administered diagnostic tests, for individual parents', students' and teachers' information only. Remove the "internal market" elements to the education system which give schools, exam boards and universities an incentive to dumb down (because the more people who choose their courses and the more people who get good grades, the more money they get).
*in all public services, find a simple, non-time-consuming way of recording information, so public bodies are accountable but don't waste hours of their time filling in forms.
*legalise gay marriage and stop making exemptions for religious groups from gay rights laws
*by all means end the anomaly which makes cohabiting couples worse off than non-cohabiting ones, but please, please, please don't use tax laws to try to bludgeon us down the aisle. (a) it won't work - do you know anyone whose choice of whether to marry or not came down to tax? (b) it's intrusive and discriminatory.
*stop passing laws and making other decisions as kneejerk reactions to big media stories. I'd so love a Government which has the guts to be unpopular in the short-term and trusts us to judge them on long-term results, instead of being dictated to by the Sun and the Mirror.
*if public sector pay freezes and job losses have to happen, they should start at the top and MPs and senior executives should lead by example
As this is a wish-list. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes.
Though when it comes to schools, I really wish I could think of a way of actually getting that to happen :/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pKA49...eature=related

How things have changed. Shouldn't have financed the boom with debt I guess. But most importantly they shouldn't have lost the original promise of those first hundred days back in 1997. They are tired. They are battered. That's why they have lost me, and that is what it will take to win me and many people like me back.


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Last edited by Overdose; April 7th, 2010 at 11:02 pm.
  #12  
Old April 9th, 2010, 6:49 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

Oh, well looks like I'm at odds with the conservatives again over national insurance. I checked their figures at work today and yup, they do not add up.

I would of course prefer a future chancellor who could add, subtract and yes, even divide and multiply.

Taking a look at the Labour manifesto at the moment, I like the idea of defecit reduction, but again most of that will naturally occur from the forecast upswing. What is more necessary as far as I am concerned is a re-evaluation of where the state should stand in terms of local issues.

The Liberals are probably the most likely to unseat the Conservatives in my constituency and I have a lot in common with them on the economy however, I am not so sure about their ideas regarding Europe.

Well guys, looks like this particular centre-righty will have to check back in once I've decided which of this plethora of snake-oil sellers and used car dealers has some basic competency.


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  #13  
Old April 10th, 2010, 2:35 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

The Tories tax breaks for married couples look like a damp squib - a whole 2.88 a week if you are married! What are they thinking of?


  #14  
Old April 10th, 2010, 11:57 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

George Osborne is increasingly becoming a major worry.

I assumed that I'd learn to accept him as reasonably competent once I got to hear more from him. Doesn't seem to be the case, though.

Really worrying.

I'd like a competent chancelor in these times. Why on earth couldn't the Tories (of all parties!) find somebody with a bit more credibility? It's crazy!


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  #15  
Old April 11th, 2010, 6:57 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mundungus Fletc View Post
The Tories tax breaks for married couples look like a damp squib - a whole 2.88 a week if you are married! What are they thinking of?
It's bizarre, isn't it? Such a tokenistic amount, it's not likely to please the socially conservative lobby, but still goes far enough in that direction to annoy the socially liberal. It's almost like they're trying to alienate people.


  #16  
Old April 13th, 2010, 12:01 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

The Guardian have got a copy of the Labour manifesto, marked with their senior journalists' annotations, on their website. It's quite amusing in places:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/i...0-policy-guide


  #17  
Old April 13th, 2010, 12:58 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

I suspect a Labour mole is working for the Tories. How else can you explain their launching of the manifesto at the derelict Battersea Power Station? It is a symbol of what they did to the country last time they were in power and all attempts to develop the site since then have been thwarted by the local Tory council


  #18  
Old April 13th, 2010, 1:54 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

I'm about to read the Tory Manifesto. I find the "Join the British Government" idea they've got a bit amusing tbh.


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  #19  
Old April 13th, 2010, 5:44 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

Quote:
The Tories tax breaks for married couples look like a damp squib - a whole 2.88 a week if you are married! What are they thinking of?
A sad appeal to social conservatism which simply doesn't exist to any significant degree in the United Kingdom.


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  #20  
Old April 13th, 2010, 8:05 pm
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Re: United Kingdom Election 2010

I think you'd be surprised as to how much social conservatism there actually is.
Most of the Conservative manifesto is centred around the great society idea, presumably as a reaction to the Thatcher mis-quote but also since it informs most of their current policy. I'm big on charity group work and co-operative ownership. It's something that will play extremely well in the suburbs. Not so much again, on Europe. I'm also big on running test trials for voluntary national service and so forth but frankly I did Duke of Edinburgh back in the day and I don't really see the difference.


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