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-   -   Alfred Hitchcock Movies (http://www.cosforums.com/showthread.php?t=113298)

halfbreedlover October 24th, 2007 9:17 pm

Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Which ones have you seen? Which ones would you recommend? Any interesting trivia?

To answer my own questions:

1.) Murder, Dial "M" For Murder, North by Northwest, Psycho, Rebecca, The Lady Vanishes, To Catch a Thief, The Wrong Man and Rear Window

2.) I would recommend Psycho, Murder!, and Rear Window. I think close seconds would be The Lady Vanishes, Rebecca, The Wrong Man and North by Northwest.

3.) In his later movies, Hitchcock always made a point of appearing very briefly in a movie, often as an extra.

Desraelda October 25th, 2007 2:54 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Out of those you listed, Rear Window and Dial M for Murder are my two favorites. I just watched "Dial" last week.

Emma October 25th, 2007 4:45 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I love Hitch....I remember the Hitchcock TV program....I look for it on the retro chanels... I do think that my favorite Hitchcock is OG forget the name...the one where they are in the boat....and he in on the newspaper....what is the name?????

gertiekeddle October 26th, 2007 9:19 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Ah... the suspense! :lol:

Which ones have you seen?
All I think.

Which ones would you recommend?
I love Vertigo, North by Northwest, Rope, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Rear Window and think these are got recommendations for a start as well. Also The Birds.

Any interesting trivia?
Many, but the one I love most (but also have posted already in classical movies) is a technical information about the movie Rope, which was filmed in one scene only. Just due to film reels not being long enough back almost 70 years ago Hitchcock had to find a way to hide the changing of the reels. So you see for instance the camera moving forward a dark bag, then the film reel was changed (short cut, but invisible for the viewer), then the same scene was continued. Brilliant!

Wright1771 October 26th, 2007 9:41 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
My favourite has always been 'Rear Window'......they were all good, especially the music. Bernard Herman, fantastic!

Bonta Kun October 26th, 2007 6:21 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I would probably go for Rear Window as my favourite too, along with Psycho.

As a heads up to any UK members who are interested in Hitchcock HMV are selling an excellent box set at £25 for 14 films! It doesn't have all of them but it has a great selection including Psycho, Vertigo, The Birds, Rear Window, Rope, The Man Who Knew Too Much, Marnie, Frenzy and a few more. They're the slimline cases too so it doesn't take up a lot of space, I bought it myself and was really happy with it- it usually costs about £90 I think (I don't work for them, I just like a bargain!)

mac_attack October 26th, 2007 7:31 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Trivia: Hitchcock shot Psycho in black and white because he thought it would be too gory in color. The blood in the shower scene was chocolate syrup. And contrary to popular belief, Hitchcock did not surprise the woman in the shower with ice-cold water to get a realistic scream. ;) Psycho was the first American film to show a toilet flushing onscreen. The shower scene took 7 days to shoot.

ParanoidAndroid October 29th, 2007 1:26 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Vertigo is the best movie ever made.

I also really like Rebecca, Notorious, Strangers on a Train, Shadow of a Doubt, Rear Window, North by Northwest and Psycho.

halfbreedlover October 29th, 2007 4:00 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Desraelda (Post 4823735)
Out of those you listed, Rear Window and Dial M for Murder are my two favorites. I just watched "Dial" last week.

IMDB's list is a bit more comprehensive than mine. ;) That's where I drew mine from.

Desraelda October 29th, 2007 3:34 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by halfbreedlover (Post 4827667)
IMDB's list is a bit more comprehensive than mine. ;) That's where I drew mine from.

Thanks, I read through the list. I have to add Strangers on a Train to my list. My favorite scene is the old man crawling under the Merry Go Round to hit the breaks. The first time I saw it, the scene could have gone either way. He wasn't a major character, after all. But I still hold my breath every time I watch that bit.

The only trivia I can think of is that in Rebecca, the second wife's name was never mentioned. I can't remember if that's the way it was in the book, but I doubt it.

Wizard_Pupil October 29th, 2007 5:38 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
My favorite Hitchcock movie is definitely Psycho!

I have seen
Birds (I love it too)
The man who knew too much (This one I love it too, one of my favs)
Vertigo
The rear window

I think that´s the ones, i dont remember now another

ParanoidAndroid October 31st, 2007 10:21 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

The only trivia I can think of is that in Rebecca, the second wife's name was never mentioned. I can't remember if that's the way it was in the book, but I doubt it.
It is that way in the book. She is refered to as "I" the entire time. There is a line of dialogue that says it is an unusual name, but no mention of it.

MmeBergerac November 20th, 2007 7:24 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I highly reccomend the first Hitch movie I watched: Rebecca. It's so oppressing, Joan Fontaine looks so frail and shy, Lawrence Olivier is so cute, and Mrs Danvers so scary... One of his best movies.

Trivia for Rebecca (spoiler): Hitchcock changed a couple of things from the book:
1) Rebecca had had an affair with Maxim's sister's husband.
2) In the book, Maxim killed Rebecca: she knew she was dying and provoked him till he shot her (what, for me, is a twisted way of suiciding).

I learned this because I had to read the book for an English exam; a couple of weeks before it I watched the movie for the first time and noticed the changes. And later, in the exam, they asked precisely about those things that were different! Most of people had just watched the film...

My other favourite Hitch movie: Vertigo. It provoked me a crush for James Stewart that has not faded away yet. He's great also in Rear Window and The Rope (actually, he's great almost in every role he played), but here he's just superb: tender, troubled, obsessed, everything at the time. And seeing her, I don't wonder he falls for Kim Novak...

Rhys135 November 20th, 2007 8:11 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I've seen quite a few, my first being The Birds when I was around eleven years old.

My favourite's include Psycho, The 39 Steps, North By Northwest, Rear Window, Vertigo and The Man Who Knew Too Much. All have great storyline's, great twist's,beautiful acting, fantastic set-piece's and keep your attention throughout.

I recently purchased To Catch A Thief, but found it very boring. Defintley the worst film by this brilliant director.

Desraelda November 21st, 2007 1:10 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MmeBergerac (Post 4847235)
Trivia for Rebecca (spoiler): Hitchcock changed a couple of things from the book:
1) Rebecca had had an affair with Maxim's sister's husband.
2) In the book, Maxim killed Rebecca: she knew she was dying and provoked him till he shot her (what, for me, is a twisted way of suiciding).

I remembered that from the book, but I thought it was hinted in the movie that Maxim actually shot Rebecca. Wasn't that in a flashback or am I confusing the book and the movie. It's been a long time since I've seen it.

MmeBergerac November 21st, 2007 8:52 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Desraelda (Post 4847537)
I remembered that from the book, but I thought it was hinted in the movie that Maxim actually shot Rebecca. Wasn't that in a flashback or am I confusing the book and the movie. It's been a long time since I've seen it.

No, it wasn't. In the movie, Maxim tells his wife that Rebecca told him he was going to have a baby (and he wasn't the father), and that she didn't stop laughing; then she tripped, fell and hit her head against the boat behind her, or so. It's true that Maxim says something like I think she wanted me to kill her or I wanted to kill her. I don't remember exactly just now, but of the change, I'm sure. Someone (Hitchcock, or the producer, I don't remember) thought people wouldn't like the movie if the main character was actually a killer.

Liselle November 21st, 2007 4:13 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Great idea for a thread :tu:

While I'm not so keen on thrillers or horrors in general due to an over active imagination, I very much like the style of all Hitchcock's movies. They're a great refreshing look at how good movies and films should be made where the focus is on the actors and their actions, interactions and reactions instead of special effects.

I'm a very big fan of Rebecca and Rear Window. Two wonderful films that I would recommend highly.

Desraelda November 22nd, 2007 12:55 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MmeBergerac (Post 4847745)
No, it wasn't. In the movie, Maxim tells his wife that Rebecca told him he was going to have a baby (and he wasn't the father), and that she didn't stop laughing; then she tripped, fell and hit her head against the boat behind her, or so. It's true that Maxim says something like I think she wanted me to kill her or I wanted to kill her. I don't remember exactly just now, but of the change, I'm sure. Someone (Hitchcock, or the producer, I don't remember) thought people wouldn't like the movie if the main character was actually a killer.

Thanks. I can't believe how long it's been since I've seen Rebecca.

Pegasus November 23rd, 2007 9:51 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I like Wait Until Dark, Vertigo, and The Man Who Knew Too Much.
Has anyone seen The Trouble With Harry? I'd imagine it's much less well known, but it's a lot of fun. Not really typical Hitchcock, though.

Desraelda November 23rd, 2007 10:01 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pegasus (Post 4849576)
I like Wait Until Dark, Vertigo, and The Man Who Knew Too Much.
Has anyone seen The Trouble With Harry? I'd imagine it's much less well known, but it's a lot of fun. Not really typical Hitchcock, though.

My daughter and I were talking about Psycho this morning, and I brought up this thread. She said not too many people know that The Trouble With Harry is one of Hitchcock's. So you, me and her are among the few. And probably most people on this thread. :tu:

Yes, it's a lot of fun. That's the best way to describe it.

IenjoyAcidPops November 23rd, 2007 11:15 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Well, I've only seen three of Hitchcock's: Psycho, The Man Who Knew Too Much (the Jimmy Stewart version), and Notorious. I highly enjoyed each of them, but Psycho is definitely my favorite. I've got North by Northwest on my Netflix queue, though.

Anhelda November 30th, 2007 1:25 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Ooh, a Hitchcock thread--awesome!

Movies I've seen (that I can think of right now, which means there may be some I'm forgetting):
The Birds, Rebecca, Lifeboat, Suspicion, Notorious, North by Northwest, The Trouble with Harry, Vertigo, Dial M for Murder

Movie's I'd recommend: any and all--I've never seen a bad Hitchcock movie

Trivia--there's no musical score to The Birds--never any music playing in the background unless it can be seen as coming from something visible in the scene, eg. a radio, a record player, etc.

Trivia #2--In Suspicion, when Cary Grant brings milk up the stairs for Joan Fontaine, Hitchcock put a small lightbulb into the milk glass to make it glow, so that it would look more suspicious (since the audience wasn't sure if Cary had poisoned it.)

ScrewDelicacy December 15th, 2007 5:25 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Well... my favorite Hitchcock movie has to be Rear Window.

What do you all think about the movie Disturbia? I actually thought it was a wonderful homage to Rear Window. But, I'd love to hear some of your opinions too!

sllagnire December 17th, 2007 2:15 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I have only seen one Alfred Hitchcock movie, and that was The Birds. I am honestly not a huge fan of horror type films, but I loved this one. I saw it quite a few years ago with my mom and remember that we loved the part where there was a guy who had had his eyes poked out and we rewound it and watched it and rewound it and watched it. I don't think I could count how many times we saw that scene. We thought it was so great.

MmeBergerac December 22nd, 2007 5:36 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Perhaps you like this as a curiosity: it's a commercial of champagne brand, directed by Martin Scorsese and paying homage to Hitchcock. Just click on "Ver la película"

marek_black December 22nd, 2007 10:56 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
my favorite Hitchcock movie is Suspcion and Notorious they are wonderful I want to see more of those movies but they don't play them enough for me

GrangerHermione January 5th, 2008 2:40 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I have only seen one Alfred Hitchcock movie, not too long ago, actually. i don't remeber what it was called, though. It was about this guy in a wheelchair spying on his neighbors' houses. He figures out a mystery where someone murdered their wife . . . I don't remember all the details. The mystery was really interesting!

MmeBergerac January 5th, 2008 6:33 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by GrangerHermione (Post 4890054)
I have only seen one Alfred Hitchcock movie, not too long ago, actually. i don't remeber what it was called, though. It was about this guy in a wheelchair spying on his neighbors' houses. He figures out a mystery where someone murdered their wife . . . I don't remember all the details. The mystery was really interesting!

That's Rear Window, one of the best of Hitchcock. If you liked it, you could try Vertigo; I'm sure you'll find it very thrilling, too.

ComicBookWorm January 12th, 2008 12:16 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by marek_black (Post 4876366)
my favorite Hitchcock movie is Suspcion and Notorious they are wonderful I want to see more of those movies but they don't play them enough for me

Notorious is my favorite, too. Although I also love The Lady Vanishes and The 39 Steps. North by Northwest is another favorite. Suspicion was terrific. So was Strangers on a Train and Shadow of a Doubt.

The Lady Vanishes and The 39 Steps were both suspense movies that were also screwball comedies.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Anhelda (Post 4855067)
Movie's I'd recommend: any and all--I've never seen a bad Hitchcock movie

That's how I feel about it. In general, I think the Cary Grant Hitchcock movies were the best.

REMEMBERALL January 12th, 2008 3:00 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MmeBergerac (Post 4876134)
Perhaps you like this as a curiosity: it's a commercial of champagne brand, directed by Martin Scorsese and paying homage to Hitchcock. Just click on "Ver la película"


That was GREAT! thanks for sharing that, loooved the birds at the end :lol:

IenjoyAcidPops January 18th, 2008 8:42 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I watched North by Northwest Tuesday night, and it certainly earns it's reputation. It's rare to find a film as versatile as this; Hitchcock moves the piece from high adventure to broad comedy to subtler humor to genuine tension with such panache. A great script. And a fine cast, with the best work from Cary Grant and James Mason I've seen. The only real weak link, in my opinion was that I didn't really feel much of a chemistry between Grant and Eva Marie Saint.

halfbreedlover January 24th, 2008 5:40 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I just saw ("just" meaning a few minutes ago) a great Hitchcock movie called Frenzy. It is definitely one of the most suspenseful movies I've seen.

ComicBookWorm January 24th, 2008 10:41 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Frenzy was one of his lesser known movies. But it certainly was suspenseful.

Headless_Nick January 27th, 2008 9:22 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
The only Hitchock movie I've seen was The Birds, which I thought was extremely lame. I still do. I mean, c'mon, it's a bunch of people acting like idiots and screaming every time they see a bird!

Edit: I did like the parakeets, though. They made me laugh.

ComicBookWorm January 27th, 2008 9:29 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
The Birds was kind of lame. Even the premise, which they never explained. If you want a treat try to catch his earlier movies. I think the most recent, really good, movies he made were Psycho and North by Northwest, which were both made in the 60s (Well North by Northwest was 1959). All his movies in the 30s, 40s, and 50s were treasures. Some of his less successful movies made in the 60s were good too, like Frenzy and Torn Curtain. Torn Curtain had an amazing scene with a memorable life and death struggle, but other parts were just ok.

I've think I've seen every Hitchcock ever made, including some silent movies made in the 20s. They are all amazing in one way or another and well-worth looking into.

ETA: Frenzy was 1972.

IenjoyAcidPops January 27th, 2008 10:01 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Actually, Frenzy, his penultimate film, was released in 1972.

ComicBookWorm January 27th, 2008 10:43 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by IenjoyAcidPops (Post 4912052)
Actually, Frenzy, his penultimate film, was released in 1972.

Yeah, I almost edited my entry to be more accurate, but my computer decided to freeze right then.

Kate Johnson January 31st, 2008 11:46 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MmeBergerac (Post 4847745)
Someone (Hitchcock, or the producer, I don't remember) thought people wouldn't like the movie if the main character was actually a killer.

It wasn't that. It had to be changed so the film complied with the Hollywood Production Code (also known as the Hays Code).

And that's why I don't like Rebecca. I have read and studied the book (I wrote my A-Level English Literature coursework on it) and I love the book, I think it's fantastic. However, and much as I understand why they had to change it (I am a film student), by changing Rebecca's death so Maxim didn't kill her, you take away the motivation for the way Maxim behaves.

MmeBergerac January 31st, 2008 3:38 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Kate Johnson:
You're right, changing Rebecca's death leaves Maxim as an illogical character. One thinks: well, if it was an accident, why couldn't he say the truth when it happened? Unless you begin to consider that, as he had wanted to kill her he felt guilty and somehow thought he had killed her in an indirect way (that thing called sin of thought) and so... But in that case, it would have needed a better explanation.

What really bothers me of that change is that the subtlety behind Rebecca's death gets almost completely lost. Because, if you think of it Maxim killed herin the book... but she provoked him on purpose. So, at the end, it was a very twisted way of suicide (ruining her husband's life, by the way).

But anyway, Rebecca is an excellent movie. If you haven't read the book, you may not notice that flaw...

Kate Johnson January 31st, 2008 4:03 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I think Rebecca probably is a good film, but as a lover of the book I find it so hard to forgive them changing the circumstances of Rebecca's death, even if I understand why they had to change it. Can't have Hitchcock being perfect!

Querida_jesse February 12th, 2008 6:16 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I just watched Rear Window and The Man Who Knew Too Much in my Media English class and we'll be watching Psycho and Vertigo! I really like Rear Window and "TMWKTM", I definitely recommend these!

MmeBergerac February 13th, 2008 7:05 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Your teacher makes you watch Hitchcock movies in English class?? Lucky you! He/she has a good taste. The best movie my teacher made us watch was The Lion King, and I was already getting tired of Disney films.

I watched "Dial M for Murder" a couple of weeks ago. I was so tired, but was unable to go to bed, so good it was. And Grace Kelly was so beautiful... I laughed as mad with the character of the policeman. It's great the way Hitchcock had to insert comical touches in the critical moment. OTher wise, the tension would be almost unbearable.

AmyBenson February 14th, 2008 12:41 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I have seen two Hitchcock films. I have seen Rear Window and Mr. and Mrs. Smith. I actually just learned today that Mr. and Mrs. Smith is a Hitchcock film. I was completely surprised to learn he had directed it because it is this wonderfully funny romantic comedy without even a moment of suspension. I really like Rear Window, but I saw it after I saw Disturbia so it was hard for me to look at it as a distinctly different film. I kept drawing parallels between the two. However, Jimmy Stewart is about a million times more likable than Shia LeBeouf in my opinion.

RemusLupinFan February 23rd, 2008 2:14 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I've seen a couple of Hitchcock movies. I've seen The Birds, Vertigo, and I think North by Northwest, and possibly another one, but I don't remember the title. Unfortunately I only remember bits and pieces of the plots - I saw them a long while ago. But it would be interesting to see some of them again. I'd also like to see Psycho, since that was the most famous one.

Perlidia September 27th, 2009 4:36 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Although Hitchcock's obsession with "the ice cool blonde" annoys me, because his casting is nearly as predictable as his cameo in each film, I do understand the significance of style in his films and how his films achieve their very original look.
His technical ability is unsurpassed by many and I agree he is a pioneer in his field of suspense & psychological thrillers.

My favorite films of his are:

Dial M for murder (mostly for content - I think its a great adaptation)

Psycho (Cinematography for this film is outstanding and Anthony Perkins's timing is impeccable throughout the whole film)

Rebecca (I like his interpretation, though I agree he could have been braver and kept the original ending)

Rope (not his best film - but very original technically and cleverly edited)

And my absolute favorite Suspicion, the subtle use of music in this film is the work of genius.

DML1991 September 27th, 2009 7:42 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Perlidia (Post 5426572)
Rebecca (I like his interpretation, though I agree he could have been braver and kept the original ending)

What was the original ending?

Perlidia September 27th, 2009 9:05 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by DML1991 (Post 5426653)
What was the original ending?

By original ending I mean the ending in the book:

Spoiler: show
Rebecca's death is a murder in the novel and an accident in the film. In the novel it is discovered that Maxim shot Rebecca, however in the film he contemplates killing her as she is jeering at him. She falls and hits her head and he panics and sends her body out to sea. Hitchcock changed it in order to comply with the Hollywood Production Code (the murder of a spouse had to be punished)

lcbaseball22 September 28th, 2009 12:25 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
As I said on the "your favorite director" thread, this is one director I've yet to see a single film from. :whistle: I was looking through his resume on RT the other day and I was blown away by the impressive number of supposedly high quality films he helmed. I asked my dad if he'd seen any of them and found out that Hitchcock is his fav director of all time! :wow: So yeah, I am def gonna have to check some of these out. :tu:

Also, I notice he's considered "The Master of Suspense" and I've always been a fan of mystery/suspense (like Agatha Christie novels) so I imagine I'll enjoy a good deal of em. Just look at this, that is unbelievable- http://www.rottentomatoes.com/celebr...red_hitchcock/ :wow:

TEN titles with 100% approval...most directors don't even have one! :lol: Plus another 13 in the 90 percentile. And on IMDB, the following films are all in the Top 250! Psycho, North by Northwest, Vertigo, Rear Window, Dial M For Murder, Strangers on a Train, Rope, Notorious, Shadow of a Doubt, Rebecca, and The Lady Vanishes. Well, I can certainly see now why many consider him the greatest director of all time!

Of course, I'll have to see at least a couple to make that determination for myself ;) I just hope my expectations aren't too high now :lol:

MmeBergerac September 28th, 2009 12:35 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
If you want some advice, I'd begin by North by Northwest or Rear Window, which, apart of mystery, have a good dose of Hitchcock's quite special sense of humour.

IenjoyAcidPops October 3rd, 2009 4:13 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MmeBergerac (Post 5427041)
If you want some advice, I'd begin by North by Northwest or Rear Window, which, apart of mystery, have a good dose of Hitchcock's quite special sense of humour.

Funny, Rear Window was the subject of my film studies class today.

LadyLucious October 6th, 2009 7:55 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
My fav Hitchcock movies are Rebecca, North by Northwest, The Birds, Rear Window, Dial M for Murder & Shadow of a Doubt =)

jordmundt6 October 9th, 2009 11:22 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Dial M for Murder is quite good. North by Northwest is pretty good--parts of it are excellent and parts of it are annoying. I've seen Vertigo and it's very well done but can anyone explain to me why that film would be broadcast on Oxygen or Lifetime, the two "Television for Women" stations when all the women in that show are so horribly abused?

Strangers on a Train has a towering reputation and has a concept that has become a favorite trope of mystery writers and writers for television crime dramas, but I thought it was just okay.

To Catch a Thief was okay, I suppose but the pacing felt absolutely glacial. The 39 Steps felt unfinished, like 2/3 of a good movie with an unsatisfying ending. The Man Who Knew Too Much was great (and I don't particularly like Doris Day).

ComicBookWorm October 12th, 2009 4:03 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
The Lady Vanishes is a special treat that all should experience. I rather like The 39 Steps too. Notorious is one of his best. And I always enjoy North by Northwest, since Grant was given a role written perfectly for him. I only find some of To Catch a Thief enjoyable, parts are annoying. And Rear Window has its moments, but parts are also annoying. I don't think I like Grace Kelly all that much. Although I do like Dial M for Murder. I actually got to see it in 3-D, which was a hoot.

Shadow of a Doubt is quite good all the way throughout. Rebbecca is excellent, but not typical Hitchcock fare. Torn Curtain isn't all that great, but it has a fabulous struggle to the death scene, where the villain just won't die, despite being stabbed and gassed in an oven. Strangers on a Train is suspenseful, but I don't enjoy it all that much. Psycho, of course is a masterpiece. But I don't like The Birds all that much.

Mundungus Fletc October 12th, 2009 4:06 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm (Post 5436006)
But I don't like The Birds all that much.

I found it absolutely terrifying - possibly because birds are such commonplace animals.

ComicBookWorm October 12th, 2009 4:12 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
As into science fiction as I am, you'd think I'd be willing to suspend my disbelief for The Birds, but I never found it convincing. And they didn't have enough birdstuff on the ground either. All those birds and the ground should have been slick.

Mydrgnfly October 12th, 2009 4:54 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
%%

AldeberanBlack October 12th, 2009 5:17 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I just have a really bad feeling "The Birds" will eventually be remade (ie: ruined) by Rob Zombie.

IenjoyAcidPops October 12th, 2009 9:26 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by AldeberanBlack (Post 5436057)
I just have a really bad feeling "The Birds" will eventually be remade (ie: ruined) by Rob Zombie.

Ugh, isn't that a nauseating thought? Actually, a while back - as in a year/year and a half ago - I read that Martin Campbell (GoldenEye, The Mask of Zorro, Casino Royale) was going to direct a Birds remake, with Naomi Watts in Tippi Hedren's role. This was before he started on the Green Lantern movie. I still don't care for the idea; that idea was done probably done as well as it could be the first time.

jordmundt6 October 12th, 2009 9:38 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Almost as bad an idea as the Gus Van Sant shot for shot remake of Psycho with Vince Vaughn as Norman Bates and Anne Heche--ANNE HECHE:argh::argh: in the Janet Leigh role. Probably from the same minds that had Anne Heche voice Lois Lane in a feature-length animated film. You know, I look at that '98 Psycho cast and there is talent there. Rita Wilson, James Remar, William H. Macy, Julianne Moore, Philip Baker Hall. All of those actors are pretty solid, but why was this remade?

ComicBookWorm October 12th, 2009 9:47 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Beats me. It's a set up for failure. It would like remaking Gone with the Wind.

jordmundt6 October 12th, 2009 10:04 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Well, no. Gone With the Wind has a reputation that's hugely overinflated, but still based on reputation--maybe it's similar.

lcbaseball22 October 13th, 2009 5:23 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I watched my first Hitchcock film last night! :D

I went with North by Northwest. :tu: I don't have time to review it right now but I'll say that it def lived up to it's reputation. :cool:

lcbaseball22 October 16th, 2009 2:09 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MmeBergerac (Post 5427041)
If you want some advice, I'd begin by North by Northwest or Rear Window, which, apart of mystery, have a good dose of Hitchcock's quite special sense of humour.

Thanks! :D

I watched Rear Window...and it was even better! :wow: (I'd likely put this in my Top 10) North by Northwest was a Top 25 film for me, BTW

I know he has like 9 other films on the IMDB Top 250 list, but I'm not sure which I should watch next :lol: Any suggestions? :) I am afraid I may have seen the best one (I know Rear Window is commonly considered his best or one of them at least) and it's downhill from here :whistle:

I think I might try to watch all of those remaining 9 in due time though. :cool:

MmeBergerac October 16th, 2009 8:01 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Rebecca is another masterpiece, with one of the best villains in History (I won't tell you who), though it's a full drama. However, if you enjoyed James Stewart in Rear Window, he is even better in Vertigo.

DML1991 October 16th, 2009 8:20 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Wasn't a fan of Rebecca honestly. :shrug:

Vertigo and Psycho are my favorites, especially the latter (as I've discussed with lc already). If you loved Stewart's performances, but want something a little less heart pundingly terrifying, go with Rope. It's my favorite Stewart performance too, once he enters the room, he commands the scene, you can almost feel the other actors shake, which goes with their character's feelings, so all is well. :D

lcbaseball22 October 17th, 2009 11:02 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Thank you both for the suggestions! :)

DML talked me into Rope...wasn't the best but certainly still great and interesting. I just wish that Stewart had been in the whole thing. :(

I also just finished watching Dial M for Murder. :tu: :cool: I do plan to see Psycho sometime...but I'm not much of a fan of the horror genre and I'm rarely in the mood for such. Although, with Halloween coming up I figure that might get me in the mood, so I'll try watching it then. :p

In the next few weeks leading up to then, my plan is to watch as many Hitchcock films as possible and cap off the marathon with Psycho :scared:

I think the next I'll watch is Vertigo :hmm:

gertiekeddle October 17th, 2009 12:13 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Vertigo is among my most favourite by Hitchcock.

Don't worry about Psycho. Just as in the 'criminal' pieces, the movies aren't so much creepy than nowadays horror movies which mostly work with immediate horror effects. They're definitely masterpieces and you get some uncomfortable feelings, but the horror is (mostly) build up slowly, more arty.

lcbaseball22 October 17th, 2009 12:37 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by gertiekeddle (Post 5439640)
Vertigo is among my most favourite by Hitchcock.

Cool, well AFI does list it as the #1 Mystery film so I like the sound of that...sounds promising. :tu: Incidentally, Rear Window, North by Northwest, and Dial M For Murder also make the list of Top 10 Mystery films and those make up 3 of the 4 Hitchcock films I've seen :lol:

http://www.afi.com/10top10/mystery.html


Quote:

Don't worry about Psycho. Just as in the 'criminal' pieces, the movies aren't so much creepy than nowadays horror movies which mostly work with immediate horror effects. They're definitely masterpieces and you get some uncomfortable feelings, but the horror is (mostly) build up slowly, more arty.
Yeah, that's what I've been told...but can't that be worse? :whistle: If I'm not mistaken I've heard it mentioned as one of the best/scariest...

gertiekeddle October 17th, 2009 12:42 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5439645)
Yeah, that's what I've been told...but can't that be worse? :whistle: If I'm not mistaken I've heard it mentioned as one of the best/scariest...

Yay, actually that can be worse. I was a bit leaded by my preferences. Can't watch all these "cheap" horror movies like The Grudge, because I get quite scared for weeks. The good horror leaves me with a good thrill, but it doesn't scare me in that silly way. :lol:

lcbaseball22 October 22nd, 2009 11:04 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
So I did indeed watch Vertigo next (review quoted below) and it was excellent! :D

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22

I watched yet another Hitchock movie and at the risk of sounding cliché...

Vertigo- 96%

Well, the plot is quite implausible but I was so drawn in that I didn't realize this until afterwards...when I was reflecting back on the film. If you can overlook this minor issue I believe this is truly a cinematic masterpiece! :D All that's holding me back from giving it an even higher score than Rear Window is a personal distaste for the ending (an abrupt one yet again, but I can't deny it was brilliant even if I didn't like how it turned out) and as such Rear Window remains my favorite Hitchcock movie for the moment, with this coming in a very close 2nd. It's not quite as suspenseful but it lives up to it's reputation as a "psychological thriller" and the twists caught me by complete surprise I must say. As for the acting, Stewart gives a terrifying but extraordinary performance. He's been fantastic in everything I've seen but his role here was different...a side I hadn't seen before. And Kim Novac is another stunning blonde beauty who holds her own alongside Stewart. :tu:

I found the filming style very interesting. The "Vertigo effect" was particularly awesome and yes, "unsettling" (as the following article says)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vertigo_effect

The use of color during select scenes was pretty cool as well...for instance during the dream sequence (partly seen below) :cool:

http://content.ytmnd.com/content/e/6...16bda50a26.gif

Then came Notorious-
Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5441450)

Anyways, so continuing on with my Hitchcock marathon...and IMO, he comes back down to earth a bit with this one :lol: :p

Notorious- 79%

It still had a lot of his brilliance but it was rather dull at moments. Something about it just didn't grab me like his previous thrillers and I didn't feel as if there was much of an emotional attachment established with characters, so you could care less what happened to them. :whistle:

The romance also developed abruptly (not un-common though) and I didn't sense much chemistry between Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman.

It might still make my Top 100, but just barely...

BTW, some interesting trivia I've read-

The "on again, off again" kiss is historically famous as it was Hitchcock's way of skirting around an old code that limited kisses to 3 sec :elaugh:

And the last I just watched, was Shadow of a Doubt-

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5442837)
Shadow of A Doubt- 94%

Supposedly Hitchcock once stated that this was his personal favorite of the films he directed. While it isn't my favorite, I can see why it could be someone else's. Set aside a couple lame scenes (the main one being the ending) and some odd dialogue that occured at times and you have another masterpiece. :tu: BTW, I think it's best to watch this without any prior knowledge. I'd only read the plot summary on IMDB (basically spoiler free, like what's on the back of a DVD box, you know?) but that was enough to diminish some of the suspense for me. :sigh:


Quote:

Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm (Post 4897501)
Notorious is my favorite, too.

Hmm, while still very good I'd have to say Notorious is actually my least favorite so far...

However, I should mention that I re-watched Rope (cause my dad hadn't seen it) and it was kinda boring the 2nd time through. I'd drop my score on that one down into the low 80's (actually 80% even). It just takes too long to really become compelling (which occurs once James Stewart appears) :shrug:


Hey, so I had a question that I asked in the "rate the last film" thread but I didn't get a response. I presume I am more likely to here... :whistle:

Does anyone know how much of Hitchcock's work is adaptations based on plays, novels, etc?

Not that there is anything wrong with this, but it seems like hardly any of it is his own original material.


Oh, and any further recommendations or thoughts...these are the rest that I'm considering watching :)

The Lady Vanishes
The 39 Steps
Rebecca
To Catch A Thief
Strangers on a Train
Frenzy
The Wrong Man
Saboteur
Lifeboat
Trouble with Harry
Foreign Correspondent
The Man Who Knew Too Much
Psycho

ComicBookWorm October 23rd, 2009 9:19 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Notorious is one of his best. It focuses more on characterization than do some of his films with outstanding performances from Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman, and Claude Rains.

lcbaseball22 October 23rd, 2009 10:31 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm (Post 5443069)
Notorious is one of his best. It focuses more on characterization than do some of his films with outstanding performances from Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman, and Claude Rains.

Nah, I really can't agree there. I loved both of them in previous work I've seen, but in Notorious I thought they were just average and there was a lack of chemistry between them. :shrug: I also didn't find Bergman's character very likeable so I wasn't terribly concerned for her safety.

I do however agree about Claude Rains. He was just as good (if not better) as he was in Casablanca, in other words...outstanding again :tu:


Anyways, I just finished Strangers on a Train and I would have to say this one actually is "one of his best" :p

Yes, it's "implausible" but soo damn good. :cool: The suspense was nearly unbearable at times. I have but a few nitpicks- Hitchcock's daugher was annoying, tennis sequence was dragged out a bit too much as was the carousel scene at the end...but wow, that scene was CRAZY! :wow:

As for the acting-

Well, I liked Farley Granger's performance infinitely more than in Rope :lol: And Robert Walker...that guy gave me the creeps! :scared: Gotta be the best performance I've seen in a Hitchcock film, which is saying something. I'm shocked to discover he didn't even get an Oscar nom!

MmeBergerac October 24th, 2009 8:41 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Icebaseball - Now I only can remember Rebecca, which is an adaptation of the novel (same title) by Daphne du Maurier. If you have time, I recommend you to read it after you've seen the movie, to notice the few but important changes that AH had to do to please the studio. I once had to read the book in English for the language school, and I remember a couple of questions in the exam where precisely about those points in which book and film differ. I guess the teacher wanted to make sure that people had actually read the book instead just watched the film... (fortunately for me, I had done both :lol:)

lcbaseball22 October 26th, 2009 7:01 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MmeBergerac (Post 5439009)
Rebecca is another masterpiece, with one of the best villains in History (I won't tell you who), though it's a full drama.

I just watched it, but wouldn't call it a "masterpiece". I elaborated a bit in the "rate the last film" thread. But I'm curious, who is the "villain" you're referring to...title character? :whistle: I don't think it's a good thing when I'm not even sure who you mean after having watched the film :lol:

IenjoyAcidPops October 26th, 2009 7:03 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5444597)
I just watched it, but wouldn't call it a "masterpiece". I elaborated a bit in the "rate the last film" thread. But I'm curious, who is the "villain" you're referring to...title character? :whistle: I don't think it's a good thing when I'm not even sure who you mean after having watched the film :lol:

My first thought was that that refers to Mrs. Danvers, but it could be her or Rebecca, and I actually see that as a good thing myself.

lcbaseball22 October 26th, 2009 7:07 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by IenjoyAcidPops (Post 5444598)
My first thought was that that refers to Mrs. Danvers, but it could be her or Rebecca, and I actually see that as a good thing myself.

Hmm, I wouldn't call Mrs. Danvers "one of the best villains in history" just for...

Spoiler: show

...being an arsonist. Other than that she was just sinister. :shrug: And I'm not sure Rebecca was much of a villain either, just a conniving *****

MmeBergerac October 26th, 2009 11:49 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Well, I meant manipulative-psychotic-sinister-mental-torturer Mrs Danvers...

And, as for your review, Icebaseball, I again recommend you to read the book. That is one of the changes Hitch had to do to please the studio.
Spoiler: show

In those times, they couldn't show a husband that killed his wife and got no punishment. It was 1940!

Perlidia October 26th, 2009 2:11 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5444597)
I just watched it, but wouldn't call it a "masterpiece". I elaborated a bit in the "rate the last film" thread

If you look at the film as an adaptation of the book and not a Hitchcock film - It is a great piece of work. I read the book first and then watched the film without knowing Hitchcock directed and I have always believed it is a great adaptation.

Hitchcock captures the tone of the book perfectly and I think Fontaine did a great job as the innocent and vulnerable new wife.

My only criticism is for the end of the film (regardless of the change he had to make) Hitchcock shot it like his typical mystery reveal and I didn't think it had the same meandering flow of the book.
The novel is a story which contains a mystery - its not a mystery story, a whodunit or a thriller. The novel is more focused on the narrator trying to meet expectations left by the former Mrs de Winter.

lcbaseball22 October 26th, 2009 4:31 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MmeBergerac (Post 5444645)
Well, I meant manipulative-psychotic-sinister-mental-torturer Mrs Danvers...

And, as for your review, Icebaseball, I again recommend you to read the book. That is one of the changes Hitch had to do to please the studio.
Spoiler: show

In those times, they couldn't show a husband that killed his wife and got no punishment. It was 1940!

Yeah, I read that on Wiki. So did he get away with it then? I don't remember reading if he did or not. I would imagine so cause I hardly see that note and the speculation of her blackmailing incestuous lover as substantial evidence. Not unless in the book they also found the gun with fingerprints or something else to convict. And not that I approve, but I think I would have felt sympathetic toward Maxim either way.

BTW, I have no desire to read the book. Whether the film is a great adapation or not, the story seems weak even without the change. :shrug:

But then I guess you can't fault Hitchcock for the flaws of the novel. And all the other film elements were great, but the story keeps it from being a great film, in my opinion. Might just be cause it wasn't what I've come to expect from him though in terms of suspenseful mystery.

Perlidia October 26th, 2009 11:30 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5444753)
Yeah, I read that on Wiki. So did he get away with it then?

If you really want to know and have no interest in the book....

Spoiler: show
Yes he gets away with Rebecca's murder


Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5444753)
Whether the film is a great adapation or not, the story seems weak even without the change

It depends what you like to read. Rebecca is a great novel - you get inside the head of the narrator and really feel her vulnerability and paranoia. It has been compared to Jane Eyre and I think this is a fair comparison. But its personal choice - you either like these types of books or you don't.

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5444753)
But then I guess you can't fault Hitchcock for the flaws of the novel. And all the other film elements were great, but the story keeps it from being a great film, in my opinion. Might just be cause it wasn't what I've come to expect from him though in terms of suspenseful mystery.

Its not a mystery story, Hitchcock steers it in that direction (probably because its his genre), but he does follow the book faithfully enough, to make it very different to his usual work.

lcbaseball22 October 28th, 2009 9:47 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm (Post 5436006)
The Lady Vanishes is a special treat that all should experience.

I'm watching it right now (http://www.hulu.com/watch/63050/the-lady-vanishes) Beginning was a little slow but it is certainly getting interesting now...where did she go?! :err: Was she even real? I am doubting that myself :hmm: Those were rhetorical questions btw, I DONT want them answered :p

Sigh, it's late, I'll have to finish this tomorrow... :sigh:

BTW, I just realized this will have been the 10th Hitchcock movie I've watched! Incidentially I will have seen all of them on the IMDB Top 250 except Psycho...which I plan to watch on Halloween! :tu: I am both anxious and scared! :D :scared: There are also some NOT on the IMDB list that I wanna watch-


Suspicion- This is the one film not on the IMDB list I've been wanting to see most...but unfortunately I haven't been able to find it online. :sigh:

The 39 Steps- I started watching this a few days ago but then switched over to Strangers on a Train. It was alright, odd opening if I say so myself.
I suppose I'll go back and watch it again some day to see if it gets any better. It's one that very nearly cracked the Top 250 (score of 8.0 out of 10)

To Catch A Thief- I've heard it isn't that great and read here that it's boring...but it's Cary Grant/Grace Kelly, which sounds too good to pass up! :p I've also read that it's more of a romance film than a mystery thriller, but I tend to enjoy both. I dunno, I expect to like it even if it's not exciting.

Frenzy- All I know of this is what I read here- apparently it's one of his lesser known but it's really suspensful...sounds promising. :cool:

The Wrong Man- The plot summary sounds interesting at least. Anyone seen this who could tell me more and/or offer their opinion? It is one of the films included in the Alfred Hitchock Signature Collection box set available from Warner Bros, which is something I'm considering buying/asking for.

Saboteur- Didn't really win or was nominated for any awards but apparently this is one of his most under-rated...got a decent score on IMDB at least.

Lifeboat- Haven't seen any mention of it on this thread but it very nearly cracks the IMDB Top 250 list as well so it seems deserving of a watch. :tu:

Trouble with Harry- I read in this thread that "it's a lot of fun" That sounds good to me :D

Foreign Correspondent- Seen this listed on a few Hitchcock Top 10 lists and it was nominated for 6 Oscars including Best Picture, so it might be good

The Man Who Knew Too Much- Apparently there is 2 versions of this film :err: If I watch it though, I think I'll def go with the James Stewart version ;) And it's likely I might watch it sometime since it's another included in one of the box sets I'm considering buying or asking for this Christmas...


I'm not sure if this is a stupid question or not...but are there any Hitchcock films you guys have seen that you'd actually recommend avoiding?! :whistle:

I've read that some don't believe there is such a thing as a bad Hitchcock film...that even at the worst he's still watchable. I can't say cause I've only seen those which are his supposed best so far (every one of 'em was in the Top 250). I almost wanna watch a couple lowest rated to see if it is true.

FYI, here is how I've rated them so far (in order from highest to lowest and with the IMDB comparitive rating/ranking listed after)

Rear Window- 97% (8.8/10- Top 250: #17)
Strangers on a Train- 97% (8.3/10- Top 250: #115)
Vertigo- 96% (8.6/10- Top 250: #40)
North By Northwest- 95% (8.6/10- Top 250: #31)
Shadow of a Doubt- 94% (8.2/10- Top 250: #190)
Dial "M" For Murder- 90% (8.1/10- Top 250: #203)
Rope- 87% upon first viewing...dropped to 80% after re-watch though (8.1/10- Top 250: #215)
Notorious- 79% (8.3/10- Top 250: #120)
Rebecca- 77% (8.4/10- Top 250: #80)

Strangely, with the exception of Rope I haven't seen any were just solid "B" (the score I usually give most :p)...all been either "A" or "C" films... :hmm:

Also, I find it odd that Rebecca is the only Hitchcock film to win Best Picture and of the others listed there none of them even received a nomination for such! :grumble: In fact, the 3 Hitchcock films that received Best Picture nominations were Foreign Correspondent, Suspicion, and Spellbound. Speaking of that last, just looked it up and that's def another I'm gonna have to watch. Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck?! Hell yes! :cool: They're both incredible

lcbaseball22 October 31st, 2009 11:35 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5445784)

Strangely, with the exception of Rope I haven't seen any were just solid "B" (the score I usually give most :p)...all been either "A" or "C" films...

I spoke too soon :lol: I finished watching The Lady Vanishes and it is "a solid B" film, in my opinion. Very fun and interesting mystery though.

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5445964)

The Lady Vanishes
- 88%

According to what I've read, this was "Hitchcock's penultimate film made in the U.K. before his move to Hollywood". And it's excellent except for the slow beginning. Before long it becomes really entertaining! :D It is a bit different than the others I've watched. It has got more screwball comedy and there is more prevalent use of guns. Usually when there are guns in his movies, it seems they aren't fired but used more as a threat. Plus, he prefers strangulation as a means of killing :p The story seems a bit far-fetched but apparently it's based on an actual incident so maybe not :lol: There was also a few scenes and/or characters that I didn't understand the purpose of. Overall it's a very solid film though and I think it has a lot of "charm" :tu:

While I don't think I'd put this amongst his very best, I could definitely see myself watching it again! :cool: Reading through the FAQ's here, I think it's a film you pick up more on furthing watchings. There are some things I missed. I found it quite unpredictable, but there were some clues apparently...


And as some of you may have noticed based on my posts in the other threads, I did not actually wait until Halloween to watch Psycho. :p

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22
Psycho- 98%

A very fitting end to my Hitchcock marathon (well, minus the Bram Stoker's Dracula interruption) over the past few weeks! :cool: I think I am going to give his films a rest for a while now, but I'll most def be coming back to them...there are another 10 or so that I want to watch! :D

So that score actually places it just above Rear Window and Strangers on a Train, but Rear Window is still my fav I think. I'm awarding Psycho the top spot mainly because of the brilliant script...that was the clincher, especially the ending. Cause as you'll notice in my post from the Halloween Movies thread (seen below) up until the end I wasn't nearly as engrossed as I had been with some prevous Hitchcock.

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5446798)

Anyways, I started early. :p I'm watching your #1 there...just couldn't wait! Was dying to watch Hitchcock's most famous. I'm less than 20 minutes from the end. To be honest, so far I don't think it surpasses Rear Window, Vertigo, etc :shrug: IMO, it's a bit slow actually. So far I'd put it in the high 80's. And it hasn't been near as scary as I was dreading. I suppose it was good for it's time, but I find the shower scene a bit cheesy. In fact, there has really only been one scene that has scared me so far. It was more like the Inferi in HBP, made me jump due to the sudden shock. As a whole though, the film hasn't made much of a lasting impression yet. But maybe I'm speaking too soon :lol: I'll edit once I finish and post my complete thoughts. Should I be preparing myself for something that's gonna blow my mind here at the end...? :whistle:

EDIT:

:wow:

That ending really was something! Not only did the twist(s) blow my mind (I can't believe I didn't figure it out, considering I've seen both Identity and Fight Club, which are films that copied the basic idea), but the suspense was so heavy I'm not sure I took a breath for minutes at a time :lol: My heart was literally racing, and like I was expecting someone to jump out from any corner of every room :scared: Alright, that bumps it up a bit...it's on par with those aforementioned :p

I feel this is worthy of a few re-watches at least, in part cause I want to see if I missed any clues...and also to try to spot any plot-holes :p


So I've done it now. Watched all 11 of his films on the IMDB Top 250! :D And based on those, Hitchcock has easily become my fav director!

lcbaseball22 November 2nd, 2009 6:14 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Does anyone know if Psycho...

Spoiler: show


...was the first film to utilize the split personality twist? :cool: I know many films have copied this idea since 1960, but I'm curious if Hitchcock was the first to come up with this. I wouldn't be surprised if this was the case, since he pioneered so many things. I've seen quite a few other films where this sort of twist is employed (some to great effect) but personally I think it was best used the first time around...or at least in what I think might have been the first. I haven't seen enough films released before Psycho to really say. :whistle:

ComicBookWorm November 2nd, 2009 8:04 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Dr. Jekylll and Mr. Hyde.

lcbaseball22 November 2nd, 2009 10:46 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm (Post 5448332)
Dr. Jekylll and Mr. Hyde.

Huh? You mean that was the first? What year was that?

Except, that wasn't really utilized a twist, was it? Isn't that aspect of his character made known from the start? :hmm:

IMDB Plot summary (seen below) even says it, so it's hardly a twist. The following is nothing more than you'd read on the back of the DVD

Quote:

Dr. Jekyll faces horrible consequences when he lets his dark side run wild with a potion that changes him into the animalistic Mr. Hyde

So I'll ask again- Anyone know the 1st film to use the split personality notion as a twist? Was Hitchcock indeed the first director to do such?

ComicBookWorm November 3rd, 2009 7:37 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Hitchcock did, but I can't tell you which film since you haven't seen it.

lcbaseball22 November 3rd, 2009 8:42 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm (Post 5448847)
Hitchcock did, but I can't tell you which film since you haven't seen it.

Interesting.

Can you at least say the decade? Was it actually one of his more reputable films or one I'm likely to never give a thought to seeing anyways?

ComicBookWorm November 4th, 2009 9:32 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I don't want to spoil it for you. It was one of his respected movies, though not one of my favorites.

I have seen all of Hitchcock's movie a zillion times each. You can often catch them at TCM or AMC during a Hitchcock festival. I've also rented others from Netflix. I've even seen his obscure first movies. I definitely am a Hitchcock nut. The Lady Vanishes is a screwball comedy/mystery, and if you aren't a Brit, it needs to be seen a few times to pick up some of the throwaway lines. There are a few gems like that. I also think that The 39 Steps was a hybrid screwball comedy/thriller. I liked Foreign Correspondent too for its ligher moments. Quite a few of his movies had devilish dark humor moments, but few had outright comedy after he became more well known. I'd think that North by Northwest managed to have some humor (why waste Cary Grant's charm?)

lcbaseball22 November 4th, 2009 10:15 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm (Post 5449466)
I don't want to spoil it for you. It was one of his respected movies, though not one of my favorites.

Well, thank you for not wanting to spoil it...but if it's not on this list I previously posted I'm likely to never watch it. Although he has easily become my fav director, I don't plan to watch every one of his films :lol: :p As said before, these are the others I likely will watch sometime

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5445784)

Suspicion- The 1 film not on the IMDB list I've been wanting to see most...but unfortunately haven't been able to find it online. :sigh:

The 39 Steps- I started watching this a few days ago but then switched over to Strangers on a Train. It was alright, odd opening if I say so myself. I suppose I'll go back and watch it again some day to see if it gets any better. It's one that very nearly cracked the Top 250 (score of 8.0 out of 10)

To Catch A Thief- I've heard it isn't that great and read here that it's boring...but it's Cary Grant/Grace Kelly, which sounds too good to pass up! :p I've also read that it's more of a romance film than a mystery thriller, but I tend to enjoy both. I dunno, I expect to like it even if it's not exciting.

Frenzy- All I know is what I read here- apparently it's one of his lesser known but it's really suspensful...sounds promising. :cool:

The Wrong Man- The plot summary sounds interesting at least. Anyone seen this who could tell me more and/or offer their opinion? It is one of the films included in the Alfred Hitchock Signature Collection box set available from Warner Bros, which is something I'm considering buying/asking for.

Saboteur- Didn't really win or was nominated for any awards but apparently this is one of his most under-rated...got a decent score on IMDB at least.

Lifeboat- Haven't seen any mention of it on this thread but it very nearly cracks the IMDB Top 250 list as well so it seems deserving of a watch. :tu:

Trouble with Harry- I read in this thread that "it's a lot of fun" That sounds good to me :D

Foreign Correspondent- Seen this listed on a few Hitchcock Top 10 lists and it was nominated for 6 Oscars including Best Picture, so it might be good

The Man Who Knew Too Much- Apparently there is 2 versions of this film :err:

If I watch it though, I think I'll def go with the James Stewart version ;) And it's likely I might watch it sometime since it's another included in one of the box sets I'm considering buying or asking for this Christmas...

Spellbound- A Best Picture nominee with Ingrid Bergman and Gregory Peck?! Sounds hard to go wrong with this one! :cool:

Since you've "seen all of Hitchcock's movies" (literally? :wow:) I was wondering if you'd be willing to share further thoughts on these films. :)

Are there any you recommend avoiding...or is there truly no such thing as a "bad" Hitchcock film?

ComicBookWorm November 5th, 2009 7:37 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I'd recommend seeing the earlier Man Who Knew Too Much, although the more recent one is better known. The more recent one has Doris Day, and she even sings in it--blech (although Jimmy Stewart is fine). The Trouble with Harry was a lot of fun, although not a typical Hitchcock movie. It's one of his few later movies with humor. Frenzy is gripping. To Catch a Thief has never done that much for me, but I love Cary Grant and he saves the movie. Suspicion is good, although they changed the ending. Be sure to watch The 39 Steps since it is almost as much fun as The Lady Vanishes. Foreign Correspondent was more a straight adventure movie, than a typical Hitchcock thriller, but still very enjoyable.

I didn't like The Wrong Man all that much. It was rather drab, deliberately so, but that doesn't change the fact that it was drab. It taps into one his favorite themes of being wrongly accused and mistreated by the authorities. Saboteur, North by Northwest, To Catch a Thief, The 39 Steps all use this theme. Torn Curtain has Paul Newman, and mostly it's only so so, but it has a an amazing death struggle that is quite famous. Lifeboat is one that I tend to avoid. I've seen it a few times. The people are all too unpleasant, even though they're supposed to be. Spellbound has Ingrid Berman and Gregory Peck, how could you go wrong. It's got a great Salvador Dali sequence. Maybe too much Freudianism, but it was all the rage back then. Peck was also in The Paradine Case, which is only interesting because of the pent up sexual subtext.

Saboteur is good and is underrated, and it ends with a scene reminiscent of the end of North by Northwest. You should try to find the silent version of Hitchcock's The Lodger. It was one of his earlier films, but it showed all the elements you would eventually see in his later films. It's been remade several times, but only the silent version had Hitchcock. It has wonderful atmospherics. Sabotage (as opposed to Saboteur) is quite good and it has a doozy of a scene with child and a bomb.

lcbaseball22 November 5th, 2009 4:50 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ComicBookWorm (Post 5450031)
I'd recommend seeing the earlier Man Who Knew Too Much, although the more recent one is better known. The more recent one has Doris Day, and she even sings in it--blech (although Jimmy Stewart is fine). The Trouble with Harry was a lot of fun, although not a typical Hitchcock movie. It's one of his few later movies with humor. Frenzy is gripping. To Catch a Thief has never done that much for me, but I love Cary Grant and he saves the movie. Suspicion is good, although they changed the ending. Be sure to watch The 39 Steps since it is almost as much fun as The Lady Vanishes. Foreign Correspondent was more a straight adventure movie, than a typical Hitchcock thriller, but still very enjoyable.

I didn't like The Wrong Man all that much. It was rather drab, deliberately so, but that doesn't change the fact that it was drab. It taps into one his favorite themes of being wrongly accused and mistreated by the authorities. Saboteur, North by Northwest, To Catch a Thief, The 39 Steps all use this theme. Torn Curtain has Paul Newman, and mostly it's only so so, but it has a an amazing death struggle that is quite famous. Lifeboat is one that I tend to avoid. I've seen it a few times. The people are all too unpleasant, even though they're supposed to be. Spellbound has Ingrid Berman and Gregory Peck, how could you go wrong. It's got a great Salvador Dali sequence. Maybe too much Freudianism, but it was all the rage back then. Peck was also in The Paradine Case, which is only interesting because of the pent up sexual subtext.

Saboteur is good and is underrated, and it ends with a scene reminiscent of the end of North by Northwest. You should try to find the silent version of Hitchcock's The Lodger. It was one of his earlier films, but it showed all the elements you would eventually see in his later films. It's been remade several times, but only the silent version had Hitchcock. It has wonderful atmospherics. Sabotage (as opposed to Saboteur) is quite good and it has a doozy of a scene with child and a bomb.

Hey, thanks! :)

I was thinking of watching some silent films actually, just to see what that's all about. I was gonna start with City Lights (at a friend's rec)

But I'll go with The Lodger instead...what better than Hitchcock? :p

ComicBookWorm November 6th, 2009 12:58 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
There are three non-Hitchcock silents you should see besides City Lights. You should see Metropolis, Nosferatu. and Georges Melies' Le voyage dans la lune (you probably know this already, but it's a classic 1902 adaptation of Jules Verne's From Earth to the Moon).

halfbreedlover November 6th, 2009 4:15 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5449474)
Are there any you recommend avoiding...or is there truly no such thing as a "bad" Hitchcock film?

Mr. And Mrs. Smith is widely considered to be his worst. I've seen it, and I can see why. It is his attempt at a comedy. It didn't work.

ETA: Ditto on Nosferatu. It is truly a great silent horror movie.

ComicBookWorm November 6th, 2009 5:55 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
You can't beat Nosferatu for dark, chilling imagery.

IenjoyAcidPops November 8th, 2009 3:48 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I watched Hitchcock's final film, Family Plot (1976), on TCM earlier today. It's entertaining enough, but not a standout: nothing particularly wrong with it, but nothing particularly great about it either. John Williams does a decent pseudo-Bernard Hermann score, but that mostly just made me miss Bernard Hermann. The film isn't straight-up black comedy, but it's more comedic moments were the most enjoyable for me.

lcbaseball22 November 10th, 2009 12:40 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I watched The Lodger...or rather maybe I should say I finally finished it :lol: I fell asleep 3 times (never making it further than the first 10 min part on Youtube) but I think this was more to do with the fact that whenever I tried watching it I was insanely tired than being an un-interesting film. Plus "silent" films aren't the easiest to stay awake to. It's easier I think to doze off when there is no dialogue to listen to.

I tried reviewing it in the "rate the last" film thread-

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22 (Post 5452454)
The Lodger-

Uh, I don't have much idea how to rate this...it's a silent film. It obviously would have been better with spoken dialogue, but it was alright for what it was. There are early hints within it of Hitchcock's genius and there is still a moderate level of suspense despite the lack of sound. I couldn't really understand the logic behind the dialogue chosen for the title cards. Some of it was helpful for comprehension and others were quite pointless. I don't understand why films had to be silent in the first place. And why have the actors say their lines or move their lips or whatever when you can't hear what is being said? :whistle: Plus, they aren't really "silent" (as you'd think the name implies) cause there is still music heard, which contributed nicely. So I'm not sure how they were able to put a soundtrack in but voices. "Jack the Ripper" types always make for interesting story but picture quality was so terrible it was barely watchable. :sigh: Ok, lets see if I can rate it now... :hmm:

Acting- 6.5

Script- 7.5

Visuals- 6

Sound- 6.5

Editing- 7


Total Score- 67%




You know, I didn't even think to look for some of these Hitchcock films on Youtube. However, as I said the picture quality was terrible and barely worth watching. I'm wondering if that is just how the actual print looked though. It is such an old B/W film I would not be surprised.

I think I'm gonna watch Suspicion (one I've really been wanting to see) next, cause I just discovered someone put it on Youtube also! :D

Hopefully the picture quality is much better with this one though. If you're interested- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0McvhTS-Fos

Bonta Kun November 11th, 2009 5:57 pm

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
I really enjoy Hitchcock. My top 5 are:

Frenzy
Rear Window
Shadow of a Doubt
Rope
Psycho


The one which I just didn't 'get' was Vertigo, perhaps because I was expecting it to be very good so was bound to be disappointed.

Recently I just watched the Michael Powell film Peeping Tom which I heartily recommend to any Hitchcock fans. He worked with Hitchcock early in his career and the two were friends. It came out a few months before Psycho and has a lot of similarities and also reminded me of Frenzy quite a bit (which perhaps shows how ahead of its time it was since it was 12 years before Frenzy). It seems a shame that it didn't do too well when it came out although it has become a cult classic now. While the notoriety of Psycho helped establish Hitchcock as one of the best directors of all time Peeping Tom pretty much killed off Powell's career which is a shame. Anyway, it was well worth seeing.

ComicBookWorm November 12th, 2009 12:24 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
@lcbaseball22 The movies were silent because there was no technology for a soundtrack at the time. When they were shown in theaters there no sound at all, just a live organist playing during the movie--sometimes to a planned music score and other times whatever the organist felt would work after seeing the film a bunch of times. Later on a soundtrack was added onto to silent films, once they had the technology for "talkies." Restoration purists try to add the original music score to the soundtrack, if they can identify it.

Actors didn't always say their lines in silent films. But it did seem to help them be in mood for the scene to recite the proper lines. Singin' in the Rain, makes fun of how actors didn't always say their lines, but said other things instead.

If you haven't seen Singin' in the Rain, by all means do. It is a pure delight and it gives a good (however comical) feel for the change that talkies brought to movies. There actually were actors whose careers failed since they couldn't make the transition. They either had funny voices, couldn't say their lines, or couldn't drop the hyperbolic overacting needed for silent movies.

lcbaseball22 November 16th, 2009 9:25 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Thanks for explaining silent movies, ComicBookWorm :) That makes more sense now. And funny you should mention Singin' in the Rain, cause my friend actually said the other day how great it was, despite being a musical. I may give it a watch sometime to see for myself

But anyways, back to Hitchcock. So over the last few days I watched Suspicion and Spellbound (2 out of the 4 nominated for Best Picture)

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22

Suspicion-

Jeez, I feel so manipulated! :lol:

Quite possibly one of the most unpredictable films I've seen...so many unexpected twists and turns! :cool:

It's slow moving at first but after the 30 min. it becomes highly entertaining. Wonderfully crafted by Hitchcock. Like every shot and bit of dialogue and such seems to serve the purpose of building uh...suspicion! :lol: The highlight of the film and the reason it really works though is the acting. I don't believe the film would have been nearly as effective at building tension if not for the fantastic lead performances. Cary Grant pulls off the role of a charming yet mysterious man with a possible dark side to perfection. I just wish he'd have stopped calling her "monkey face" cause it got really annoying :relax: But it's Joan Fontaine's performance that really stands out. I can certainly see why she won the Oscar for Best Actress for this film. BTW, I've read the ending was another case of studio interference and I know many didn't like it...
Spoiler: show

...but I think it works alright and I found it ambigeous, which I thought was good here. From what I've read, Hitchcock's original ending was for Lina to be drink the milk Jonnie gives her...and die because it's poisoned. However, the studio wouldn't allow Cary Grant to be a murderer so Hitchcock had to come up with a twist ending, which many have considered "forced". I got the feeling though that he might have been lying once again and I still feared for her safety even though in the new ending he explains everything and seems innocent. :hmm:

Acting- 10
Script- 8.5
Visuals- 9.5
Sound- 7.5
Editing- 9.0

Total Score = 89%

Quote:

Originally Posted by lcbaseball22

My friend was over at the house and wished to see a Hitchcock film but figured I'd rather it be one I'd hadn't seen so we chose...

Spellbound-

Well, I think the title is appropriate...it's spellbinding! :cool:

And as unpredictable as ever! It leads you to conclusion after wrong conclusion until the very end. Now, the Fruedian psychoanalysis aspect seems illogical/dated, but for the year 1945 wasn't it cutting edge? :hmm: Besides, as Hitchcock himself said- "My dear, it's only a movie" :p

My friend sorta disliked it due to this implausibility but...

Should overlook that and see its brilliance. Incredibly fascinating and entertaining film with really cool cinematography, including a wacky dream sequence designed by Salvador Dali (a famous surrealist painter) and a scene where a couple frames are shown in color (:wow:) in what is otherwise an entirely black and white film. But I really couldn't begin to do justice to all the memorable shots in this film. The acting was great as well. Ingrid Berman once again proves herself as one of the greatest actresses of all time and I'm very surprised she wasn't at least nominated for an Oscar for her performance in this movie. Alongside Bergman is a very young Gregory Peck, who actually bears an eerie resemblance to Norman Bates from Hitchcock's later masterpiece, Psycho :scared: And while his performance is nothing close to the greatness of his later work (most notably in To Kill A Mockingbird) I think it's still very good. You know, I guess the only really bad thing about this film is I may have to watch it again (hmm, that doesn't sound so bad does it?) cause the plot was so convoluted I'm not sure I understood it all. :whistle:

Acting- 9
Script- 9
Visuals- 10
Sound- 9
Editing- 9

Total Score = 92%

As you can see, I thought they were both great but those scores fail to surpass the masterpieces that were NOT Best Picture nominations.


Oh, and this is directed @ ComicBookWorm- Is Spellbound the film that you were referring to in response to my question about Psycho? :p

Also, I was wondering if you could possibly rank his feature films from 1 to 53 since you've supposedly seen all of 'em. That'd be interesting.

Or if that's too difficult how about just those you think are the best 10? :lol:

Pearl_Took November 16th, 2009 11:26 am

Re: Alfred Hitchcock Movies
 
Which ones have you seen?

Rebecca
Notorious
Spellbound
Rear Window
North by North West
Vertigo
Psycho
The Birds
Marnie

Shockingly, for some reason I have never seen Dial M for Murder. :yuhup:

Which ones would you recommend?

All of the above, except Marnie : it's very histrionic and I find the gender politics ludicrous (and offensive) and the psychology clumsy. :shrug: Not recommended viewing for anyone not familiar with Hitchcock and how brilliant he usually is.

I don't like his 1973 Frenzy either. :td:


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