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-   -   "separated by a common language" (http://www.cosforums.com/showthread.php?t=113174)

mac_attack October 25th, 2007 3:21 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Sorry, just wanted to add that even though zuchinni is a squash, it's used a lot in breads, cakes, and brownies. :D Zuchinni bread is good...when my mom makes it, it tastes like cinnamon. :drool:

Pox Voldius October 25th, 2007 3:51 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
^ Pumpkin is a squash, too. I like pumpkin bread & pumpkin pie. :D

mac_attack October 25th, 2007 4:00 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Oh, :lol: I forgot about pumpkin! :rotfl:

ginger1 October 25th, 2007 11:25 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
In the UK we're really good at using pumpkins to hollow out and carve scary faces and add candles to make halloween lanterns - but just how many of us use them to make dishes using the insides? My only memory of pumpkin pie is of a rather bland creation that one had to suffer when the trick or treaters arrived on the doorstep, bearing wedges of something you'd rather not taste. :) Have I missed out on a good food all these years?

Lash Dresden October 26th, 2007 12:02 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4824452)
Have I missed out on a good food all these years?

Yes, you have. Pumpkin pie is :drool:

mac_attack October 26th, 2007 1:26 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Rapunzel is right, pumpkin pie is :drool:! So are pumpkin cookies, pumpkin bread, and baked pumpkin seeds!

I'm making my jack-o-lantern monday night, I'm so excited! :D I can't decide between carving a monster, bat, or cat, or just words.

Pox Voldius October 26th, 2007 2:45 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4824452)
In the UK we're really good at using pumpkins to hollow out and carve scary faces and add candles to make halloween lanterns - but just how many of us use them to make dishes using the insides? My only memory of pumpkin pie is of a rather bland creation that one had to suffer when the trick or treaters arrived on the doorstep, bearing wedges of something you'd rather not taste. :) Have I missed out on a good food all these years?

Yes.

Though, I suppose it depends on the recipe, and on the source of the pumpkin purée. (I read somewhere that the pumpkins stores sell to make jack-o-lanterns out of are not the best pumpkins to make pies or bread from -- apparently those are bred for durability & not taste. But around here, in addition to selling pre-made pumpkin pies in the grocery stores, they also sell cans of already-puréed pumpkin, with no additional ingredients, just 100% pumpkin, so I use that if I'm going to bake my own pumpkin bread or pumpkin pie.)

anabel October 26th, 2007 3:48 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pox Voldius (Post 4823689)
What other ingredients seem different, out of curiosity?

I'm not sure, but in my experience most American recipes don't turn out quite the same with British ingredients. My husband returned from a stay in the US with a bunch of hand written recipes for his favourite foods. The oatmeal cookies worked out OK, but key lime pie was distinctly runny, cornbread was obviously not right, and something called Indian pudding was a smelly, indistinguishable mess! And I'm not a bad cook in general, honest!

I think British white flour is coarser than American cake flour.

Pox Voldius October 27th, 2007 4:06 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by anabel (Post 4825031)
I'm not sure, but in my experience most American recipes don't turn out quite the same with British ingredients. My husband returned from a stay in the US with a bunch of hand written recipes for his favourite foods. The oatmeal cookies worked out OK, but key lime pie was distinctly runny, cornbread was obviously not right, and something called Indian pudding was a smelly, indistinguishable mess! And I'm not a bad cook in general, honest!

I think British white flour is coarser than American cake flour.

Hmm...I use "all-purpose flour" that says on the package "presifted * enriched * bleached". Listed ingredients are "bleached wheat flour enriched (niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), malted barley flour".
[That's like the cheapest flour my grocery store carries. :whistle:]

Though, I'm afraid I can't help you with the key lime pie, cornbread, or Indian pudding, as I've never made any of those.

edit

Oh, Wikipedia has a short section on the differences between different kinds of flour --> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flour#Types_of_flour

BTW, any recipe used in my family that calls for flour generally assumes that it will be all-purpose flour, which is apparently different from cake flour.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wikipedia
In Britain, many flours go by names different than those from America. Some American flours and British equivalents include:

Cake and pastry flour = soft flour
All-purpose flour = plain flour
Bread flour = strong flour, hard flour
Self-rising flour = self-raising flour
Whole-wheat flour = wholemeal flour


ginger1 October 27th, 2007 9:43 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
The main problem with trying to use american recipes in the UK is that we don't use cups for measuring, and although there are several web sites for converting US cups to UK oz (or grams now) it's still confusing. And australian cup sizes are different again, yes? (Still talking cooking, not female undergarments - that's a whole different subject :) )

RavenEye October 27th, 2007 1:34 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4825788)
The main problem with trying to use american recipes in the UK is that we don't use cups for measuring, and although there are several web sites for converting US cups to UK oz (or grams now) it's still confusing. And australian cup sizes are different again, yes? (Still talking cooking, not female undergarments - that's a whole different subject :) )

I've never got a recipe using cups to work yet. 1 cup always seems to be too much compared to the amounts for the other ingredients. Don't get me started on doing things with the insides of pumpkins either - it'll be going in the compost bin again this year.

Lyra Black October 27th, 2007 3:10 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4825788)
And australian cup sizes are different again, yes?

In Australia a cup is 250ml, a teaspoon is 5ml and a tablespoon is 20ml. The cup and teaspoon measurements are the same in NZ, Canada and the UK but in these 3 countries a tablespoon is 15ml. I attempted to get the USA conversions but I couldn't find consistent numbers!

This site may be useful for some people. It describes several measurement conversions and also has this useful information about flour:
Quote:

US & UK all purpose and plain flour can be interchanged without any adjustments. US cake flour is lighter however, and can be substituted with 1 cup minus 3 Tbsp. of all purpose/plain flour, and add 3 Tbsp. of cornstarch or potato flour to make the full cup. Self rising flour can be made by substituting 1 cup of all purpose/plain flour minus 2 tsp., and add 1 1/2 tsp. baking powder and 1/2 tsp. salt to make the full cup. US whole wheat flour is interchangeable with UK wholemeal flour.
I can give no guarantee that the above will work :)

Pox Voldius October 27th, 2007 7:05 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
The measuring cup I have has cups, oz, and ml marked on it -- it says 1 cup = 8oz, or somewhere about halfway between 225ml and 250ml.
(edit: I pulled out my other measuring cup, of a different brand, that I don't use much because it's plastic and doesn't wash off as well, and it appears to agree with the first measuring cup, with the 8oz or halfway between 225ml & 250ml)

Of course, maybe the easiest way to solve your problem with the cups in American recipes might be to just buy an American measuring cup off of eBay or somewhere ;)

edit

I pulled out my measuring spoons, too. The labels on them read:
"5ml (approx teaspoon)" and "15ml (approx tablespoon)" and "2.5ml (approx half teaspoon)"

RavenEye October 27th, 2007 7:41 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
This site is helpful for conversions:

http://www.onlineconversion.com/

Pox Voldius October 27th, 2007 7:55 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RavenEye (Post 4826102)
This site is helpful for conversions:

http://www.onlineconversion.com/

Oh, interesting. So our ounces are a tiny bit larger than your ounces...

Quote:

Originally Posted by onlineconversion.com
1 ounce [US, liquid] = 1.040 842 731 ounce [UK, liquid]
8 ounce [US, liquid] = 8.326 741 846 ounce [UK, liquid]

The US cups to ml seems to agree fairly well with my measuring cups, though.

anabel October 28th, 2007 10:51 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RavenEye (Post 4825870)
Don't get me started on doing things with the insides of pumpkins either - it'll be going in the compost bin again this year.

I know it's off topic, but wouldn't you like to try making pumpkin juice?

Or this one:
Quote:

Bake your Halloween jack o'lantern in the oven.
(watch the face distort and shrink - it's fun!)
Strain your pumpkin, saving the juice separately from the strained pumpkin.
Serve your chilled pumpkin juice to your guests!

This takes a good hour or two, depending on the size of your jack o'lantern, so keep checking your pumpkin as it is baking. Use a cookie sheet underneath so you can easily take the hot mushy pumpkin out of the oven and to catch any drippings. If your pumpkin was not carved, cut it in half before baking, otherwise it could explode and make a GIGANTIC mess! You will see that the juice separates from the pumpkin flesh as it starts to bake, so spoon off this juice periodically and save it so it doesn't leak all over your oven. Once your pumpkin flesh has baked long enough to be good and soft, remove from the oven and let it cool. Scoop the pumpkin flesh from the skin into a strainer with a container underneath. Use a spoon to squeeze out the juice from the pumpkin, so you have as "solid" a puree as possible, which you should save for your Pumpkin Pasties, pumpkin bread, or your favorite pie recipe.

Ironically, this is always how I strained my pumpkin after baking, since if you don't, you end up with a very watery pumpkin pie, but I always just discarded the pumpkin juice before. Now I freeze my pumpkin and pumpkin juice separately in plastic containers, and they can keep over a year in the freezer quite well. After thawing the pumpkin, you can strain again for even better results (and more pumpkin juice!) since during freezing, the ice crystals were separated from the pumpkin naturally.

I did try using pumpkin pie spice mixture to flavor my juice, but I thought the flavor was too strong. I actually prefer plain, unsweetened pumpkin juice, since it is quite refreshing and tastes a bit like iced tea. My guests liked the Butterbeer much better though! ;)
I found my American recipes worked much better when I had someone send me a set of proper American measuring cups. But the only cornbread that ever turned out right was from a recipe in an English magazine, where I presume the necessary adjustments to British ingredients had already been made.

mac_attack October 28th, 2007 11:06 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
If you really want the recipes for things like American cakes, cornbreads, puddings, etc. to turn out right, I'd recommend just going to an American supermarket (or online if you can't get over here) and buying a cheap set of measuring cups as well as a box of instant cake, cornbread, pudding, etc. mix. ;) Most of these mixes you only have to add some water, oil, and eggs to...some take only water.

That's how most of my things get cooked...cooking from scratch takes too long and I'm almost guaranteed to mess it up. If I'm already making homemade chili, I don't want to have to make a huge mess of the kitchen at my attempts at cornbread...it's easier to just use the boxed stuff. ;) In case the Brits here don't know (though you probably already do) if you make cornbread, I'd recommend serving it with chili...they go awesomely together. :drool:

Just a question...some British names for food have made me do a double-take in the past (spotted dick, bangers and mash...things like that). Are there American foods that sound quite strange to you?

anabel October 28th, 2007 11:12 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4827293)
Just a question...some British names for food have made me do a double-take in the past (spotted dick, bangers and mash...things like that). Are there American foods that sound quite strange to you?

Not to mention these yummy meatballs, whose name I cannot type here because the autocensor doesn't like it!

Pox Voldius October 29th, 2007 12:12 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by anabel (Post 4827303)
Not to mention these yummy meatballs, whose name I cannot type here because the autocensor doesn't like it!

Erm...I'm getting a 404 error when I try that link -- I think the autocensor got to your URL as well :shrug:

Chris October 29th, 2007 12:18 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pox Voldius (Post 4827375)
Erm...I'm getting a 404 error when I try that link -- I think the autocensor got to your URL as well :shrug:

Darned autocensor :argh:


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