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ginger1 October 20th, 2007 10:05 am

"separated by a common language"
 
Some of the differences in language between the US and the UK are well known, we eat biscuits/cookies, put our luggage in the boot/trunk, and walk on the pavement/sidewalk. You also have super big faucets, and we have fiddly little taps. Some words have changed their meaning so much they would be considered rude in the other country (OK, Mods, perhaps we won't go there!).

So, sticking to acceptable words, here's a question to start off - what do US men put on their nether regions when getting dressed in the morning? We wear pants, or boxer shorts, or even knickers - but pants for you are trousers for us.

HugForLupin October 20th, 2007 9:02 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Another question about this from a British girl -

If biscuits are cookies, what do you call real cookies?

Pox Voldius October 20th, 2007 10:31 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4817874)
So, sticking to acceptable words, here's a question to start off - what do US men put on their nether regions when getting dressed in the morning? We wear pants, or boxer shorts, or even knickers - but pants for you are trousers for us.

In the U.S. we call them "underwear", "underpants", "boxers", "briefs", "shorts", "boxer shorts", "whitie-tighties"... and we do have a couple vulgar expressions (which I won't repeat here, as I don't want to upset the mods) that use "pants", where the "pants" could refer to either trousers or underpants...

Quote:

Originally Posted by HugForLupin (Post 4818458)
Another question about this from a British girl -

If biscuits are cookies, what do you call real cookies?

Well, that would depend on what you mean by "real cookies" -- could you give us a description or a picture?

In the U.S., these are cookies -->
http://www.library.drexel.edu/blogs/...ox/Cookies.jpg

and these are biscuits -->
http://www.bfeedme.com/wp-content/up...20Biscuits.jpg

anabel October 20th, 2007 10:54 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
What Americans call biscuits appear to be a type of scone.

In Britain we call big chewy round things with chocolate chips in them cookies, while small, hard things that come in packets and can sit on the supermarket shelves for a year or two without going stale are biscuits. Oreos are what we would call biscuits, but the picture above illustrates chocolate chip cookies.

According to my Delia Smith cookery book, the word biscuit means "baked twice" and originally applied to bread that was dried in the oven to preserve it, ie baked twice! Sailors used to eat ship's biscuit as a staple part of their diet on long voyages.

mac_attack October 21st, 2007 2:23 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I've noticed that there is a word on here that when I use it, it is censored...Trying not to get anyone upset here...how do I say this. It starts with a C and rhymes with lap...is that considered a swear word over there or is it just offensive to certain people on the site? Because I do not swear, but I use that word, and I don't consider it a swear word..

Sorry if that's dumb...I just wondered. It's not considered a swear around here.

snapegirl October 21st, 2007 2:37 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I don't know about Britian and that word. But my part of the US, that word's a swear word, not a horrible one, but still a swear word.

unconvinced October 21st, 2007 12:02 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by anabel (Post 4818620)
According to my Delia Smith cookery book, the word biscuit means "baked twice" and originally applied to bread that was dried in the oven to preserve it, ie baked twice! Sailors used to eat ship's biscuit as a staple part of their diet on long voyages.

I think in Britain the legal difference between cakes and buscuits are that cakes go hard when they go stale while buscuits go soft. I yhink this is for tax reasons as cakes count as confectionary so get higher import duties.

Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4818894)
I've noticed that there is a word on here that when I use it, it is censored...Trying not to get anyone upset here...how do I say this. It starts with a C and rhymes with lap...is that considered a swear word over there or is it just offensive to certain people on the site? Because I do not swear, but I use that word, and I don't consider it a swear word..

Sorry if that's dumb...I just wondered. It's not considered a swear around here.

It's certainly not a swear word where I live, many a teacher in fact has used that word to describe my homework

UAM October 21st, 2007 12:44 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by unconvinced (Post 4819251)
I think in Britain the legal difference between cakes and buscuits are that cakes go hard when they go stale while buscuits go soft. I yhink this is for tax reasons as cakes count as confectionary so get higher import duties.

In Britain no VAT is charged on cakes or biscuits, but chocolate covered biscuits are taxed as they are considered luxury. This is why Jaffa Cakes are called cakes. When HM Customs & Excise challenged this McVities made a large Jaffa Cake to show it was a cake and observed that they go hard when stale therefoew making them cakes.

unconvinced October 21st, 2007 1:15 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by UAM (Post 4819275)
In Britain no VAT is charged on cakes or biscuits, but chocolate covered biscuits are taxed as they are considered luxury. This is why Jaffa Cakes are called cakes. When HM Customs & Excise challenged this McVities made a large Jaffa Cake to show it was a cake and observed that they go hard when stale therefoew making them cakes.

Oh yeah that's right I got it the wrong way round

ginger1 October 21st, 2007 4:54 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
OK, what on earth are grits? :)

8m57w6 October 21st, 2007 5:12 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Grits are a sort of porridge made from ground corn. According to Wikipedia:
Quote:

Grits are prepared by simply boiling the ground kernals into a porridge; normally it is boiled until enough water evaporates to leave it semi-solid.
They are most commonly srved as a breakfast food, and are eaten mainly in the Southern U.S. You aren't as likely to come across them if you're travelling in the East, West, or Mid-West, though you can get them at some restaurants.

HugForLupin October 21st, 2007 5:47 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4818894)
I've noticed that there is a word on here that when I use it, it is censored...Trying not to get anyone upset here...how do I say this. It starts with a C and rhymes with lap...is that considered a swear word over there or is it just offensive to certain people on the site? Because I do not swear, but I use that word, and I don't consider it a swear word..

Sorry if that's dumb...I just wondered. It's not considered a swear around here.

It depends on what type of person you are around here. Everyone at my school says it regularly, including the teachers. They also use the word for a female dog regularly, to describe the behaviour of some girls towards others. They aren't really considered swear words at school, but elderly people find the less-offensive C word...well, offensive.

anabel October 21st, 2007 11:27 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by UAM (Post 4819275)
In Britain no VAT is charged on cakes or biscuits, but chocolate covered biscuits are taxed as they are considered luxury. This is why Jaffa Cakes are called cakes. When HM Customs & Excise challenged this McVities made a large Jaffa Cake to show it was a cake and observed that they go hard when stale therefoew making them cakes.

That's funny! But Jaffa Cakes are indeed made of sponge cake, so I think that's fair enough, even though they are sold with the biscuits!

SMAC October 22nd, 2007 6:43 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I love this thread!!! I'm not from the Us or Britian, but I've always found this type f differnces in language fascinating. Dan radcliffe was on the tonight show last month I think promoting December Boys and he discussed this abit it was actually a very funny and good interview I don't know if anyone else watched it.

Hysteria October 22nd, 2007 9:58 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
OH wow so biscuits in the US are scones! How confusing. You learn something new everyday :)

Quote:

Sorry if that's dumb...I just wondered. It's not considered a swear around here.
Its kind of a swear word here (Australia, we go along with UK English obviously) but by no means a bad one, you could get away with using it in front of parents, teachers etc.

hermy_weasley2 October 22nd, 2007 3:45 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hysteria
OH wow so biscuits in the US are scones! How confusing. You learn something new everyday

I think that actually depends on who you ask--I overheard a conversation about this the other day. :lol: But, yeah, they're at least pretty similar. I've noticed that all the scones I've ever eaten (which doesn't amount to much) are less fluffy than a lot of American biscuits though, but that may just be me.

Pox Voldius October 22nd, 2007 3:54 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by hermy_weasley2 (Post 4820628)
I think that actually depends on who you ask--I overheard a conversation about this the other day. :lol: But, yeah, they're at least pretty similar. I've noticed that all the scones I've ever (which doesn't amount to much) are less fluffy than a lot of American biscuits though, but that may just be me.

I don't know if Starbucks is anything to go by (probably not) but I once had a Starbucks scone, and it was really dry and in no way comparable to an American biscuit.

Hysteria October 22nd, 2007 4:31 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

I don't know if Starbucks is anything to go by (probably not) but I once had a Starbucks scone, and it was really dry and in no way comparable to an American biscuit.
Thats even more confusing because scones arent supposed to be dry either. Well kind of but they're supposed to be fat and fluffy.

mac_attack October 22nd, 2007 6:29 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Where I live biscuits are more like a dinner roll type of thing. You would eat them with like mashed potatoes and gravy or something. And what the rest of the world calls scones is different...I'm not sure we have a name for it.
Where I live what we call scones are these. I guess their real name is Navajo Fry Bread (which I'm guessing is from the Navajo tribes), but everyone here calls them scones, and they are eaten either as a breakfast food with honey, a desert with desert toppings, or as a meal with chili, chese, lettuce, tomatoes, sour cream, and salsa served on top of it. :drool:

Another difference in language I've noticed is the suffix at the end of words like Spelled vs. Spelt or Learned vs. Learnt. At first I thought some people on here were just spelling things wrong, but then I noticed that all the ones I thought were wrong were written by Brits. :blush:

YellowPoofBall October 22nd, 2007 8:42 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Biscuits really aren't like scones at all from what I've seen. I don't think I'd eat a blueberry biscuit, nor would I put preserves on a regular biscuit...

anabel October 22nd, 2007 10:53 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
English scones use baking powder (baking soda) as a raising agent, and are somewhere between bread and cake - more solid than cake but sweeter than bread.

They are served with butter and jam, or if you are in the West Country, with clotted cream and jam. A cup of tea is almost compulsory!

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/image...reamtea203.jpg

ginger1 October 22nd, 2007 11:33 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Thanks, guys, for taking this thread up. I find the differences amusing, and occasionally really weird - for example we in the UK, would not blink or gasp, or complain about Molly Weasly calling Bellatrtx a - whatever - and I, for one was astounded when it was asterisked in the posts just after the launch of DH. It is in the Uk so mild as to be hardly a swear word at all - along with various other mild words, usually referring to "dog mess". Are they really considered to be so bad in the US?

YellowPoofBall October 22nd, 2007 11:44 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Yes, it's an extremely derogatory term toward women in the US. I've seen several feminist movements against the word.

mac_attack October 23rd, 2007 12:16 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
^^It is very derogatory indeed. I read an article about Emma Watson's new movie that someone posted in another thread, and the word Squaw was written in the heading. That word is considered very derogatory here too towards Native American women and is very seldom heard anymore. If it is referred to by the Native American peoples, it is often referred to as the s-word.

Lord_Nomolous October 23rd, 2007 12:37 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4821233)
^^It is very derogatory indeed. I read an article about Emma Watson's new movie that someone posted in another thread, and the word Squaw was written in the heading. That word is considered very derogatory here too towards Native American women and is very seldom heard anymore. If it is referred to by the Native American peoples, it is often referred to as the s-word.

Really? I've never heard that used as a derogatory word. And when people say "the s-word," they're usually not referring to that, but something else.

There's quite a humorous video about this on YouTube by the Black sisters, where they attempt American accents, and rant about crisps/chips and bogeys/boogers. :rotfl: It's absolutely hilarious!

mac_attack October 23rd, 2007 12:43 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
^^ When Native Americans refer to the S-word I mean. I know what other people mean when they say the s-word. ;) I had heard a while back that some tribes were trying to get the word removed from their language or something like that. Waynooooo has a couple British vs. American slang videos on Youtube too...his aren't really funny, tho. I just like watching/listening to him talk. :eyebrows: The only thing I dislike about those kinds of videos is the British/American war that goes on in the comments! Some people will never grow up, will they? :no:

Pox Voldius October 23rd, 2007 3:37 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by anabel (Post 4821111)
English scones use baking powder (baking soda) as a raising agent, and are somewhere between bread and cake - more solid than cake but sweeter than bread.

American biscuits also use baking powder & baking soda. Here's a recipe for Southern-Style Buttermilk Biscuits --> http://southernfood.about.com/od/bis...r/bl60127b.htm

btw, are baking powder & baking soda the same thing in UK terminology? because here, they're two different things.

Quote:

Originally Posted by YellowPoofBall (Post 4820911)
Biscuits really aren't like scones at all from what I've seen. I don't think I'd eat a blueberry biscuit, nor would I put preserves on a regular biscuit...

You know, I actually came across a recipe for Blueberry Biscuits while looking for a link to a basic American biscuit recipe :lol:

anabel October 23rd, 2007 2:20 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pox Voldius (Post 4821452)
btw, are baking powder & baking soda the same thing in UK terminology? because here, they're two different things.

In Britain we have baking powder, which is bicarbonate of soda mixed with another raising agent, and we have bicarbonate of soda alone (NaHCO3). Do you call bicarbonate of soda baking soda over there? I think I muddled that up and assumed that baking powder was the same as baking soda.

Pox Voldius October 23rd, 2007 3:57 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by anabel (Post 4821815)
In Britain we have baking powder, which is bicarbonate of soda mixed with another raising agent, and we have bicarbonate of soda alone (NaHCO3). Do you call bicarbonate of soda baking soda over there? I think I muddled that up and assumed that baking powder was the same as baking soda.

Hrm...well, I've got a box of baking soda & a can of baking powder in my kitchen, let me see what they say...

baking soda -- active ingredient is "Sodium Bicarbonate", doesn't say anything about any inactive ingredients

baking powder -- ingredients: "corn starch, bicarbonate of soda, sodium aluminum sulfate, acid phosphate of calcium"

unconvinced October 23rd, 2007 4:14 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Lord_Nomolous (Post 4821261)
bogeys/boogers

Ah so that's what they mean when they talk about boogers in the Simpsons!

mac_attack October 23rd, 2007 8:53 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I found this about Biscuits:

Quote:

Biscuit
Savoury scone (approx)
The American biscuit is a small savoury scone-like bread which is often eaten for breakfast with gravy. Indeed, biscuits and gravy are a traditional southern-style food consisting of savoury scones and a white or brown thick sauce (nothing like British gravy), often with small bits of bacon or other meat.
Which begs the question, what does it mean, "nothing like British gravy"? And It also said where I found it that Biscuits in the UK were hard, where cookies in America were all very chewy. That true? I had a teacher once from New York, and he said that before he moved to the west coast he'd never heard of anyone eating cookie dough or eating chewy cookies. :huh:

I also heard a friend say that "bombed" would mean opposite things...For example, if I said that I bombed the test, that would mean I failed. But in Britain, it would mean you aced it?

The last one I heard, the most confusing one, is the braces/suspenders. Ok, here goes. What we call suspenders you call braces, what we call braces you call retainers, what you call suspenders we call garters. Did I get that right? I can see a lot of confusion coming from those three words!!

UAM October 23rd, 2007 9:50 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4822190)
Which begs the question, what does it mean, "nothing like British gravy"?

I did wonder why you were having gravy for breakfast! In Britain gravy is a sort of sauce that is made from the juices that run off meat during cooking and then thickened up.

Quote:

And It also said where I found it that Biscuits in the UK were hard, where cookies in America were all very chewy.
Yep, biscuits are hard. They'll go soft if you leave them out but they're not meant to be like that.

Quote:

I also heard a friend say that "bombed" would mean opposite things...For example, if I said that I bombed the test, that would mean I failed. But in Britain, it would mean you aced it?
It depends. If you were to say "I bombed" then it would mean you failed, but if you said something was "the bomb" then it means it's great.

Quote:

The last one I heard, the most confusing one, is the braces/suspenders. Ok, here goes. What we call suspenders you call braces, what we call braces you call retainers, what you call suspenders we call garters. Did I get that right? I can see a lot of confusion coming from those three words!!
Braces: (i) the things you get on your teeth to straighten them (most commonly train-tracks, but could refer to retainers)
(ii) things put over your shoulders and connected to your trousers to hold them up. Sort of like the straps in dungarees.

Suspenders: women's lingerie, a band to hold up stockings.
However, if you were to talk about suspenders in reference to a man most people would probably be aware of the American usage and follow what you were saying.


Are there any Kiwis here? Does anyone know if they shorten everything like Aussies do? Is there much differece between those two languages?

Soffo October 23rd, 2007 9:54 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Wow, weird... I just learned some of this stuff at school (I'm Britain, US, Australia, etc.) but I didn't know there are actually so many of these words...

PS: What I also find a bit weird is German words in English language (kindergarten? :lol:)

CakeorDeath October 24th, 2007 6:29 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
What are zuchinies(SP)?

This is a fab thread.

YellowPoofBall October 24th, 2007 9:36 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Zucchini :lol: it's a squash

mac_attack October 24th, 2007 9:40 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
This is a zuchinni. ;) It's a type of squash.

I found this video about the difference between a last call in Canada vs England. :rotfl: :lol: :rotfl:

CakeorDeath October 24th, 2007 11:36 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4823327)
This is a zuchinni. ;) It's a type of squash.

I found this video about the difference between a last call in Canada vs England. :rotfl: :lol: :rotfl:

Is totally true!:lol:

ginger1 October 24th, 2007 11:40 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I think we would call zucchinis courgettes in the UK. Good in stir-fry's and ratatouille. :)

anabel October 25th, 2007 1:43 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pox Voldius (Post 4821922)
Hrm...well, I've got a box of baking soda & a can of baking powder in my kitchen, let me see what they say...

baking soda -- active ingredient is "Sodium Bicarbonate", doesn't say anything about any inactive ingredients

baking powder -- ingredients: "corn starch, bicarbonate of soda, sodium aluminum sulfate, acid phosphate of calcium"

That's about right then. Bicarbonate of Soda is exactly the same thing as Sodium Bicarbonate - which you call baking soda. And baking powder appears to be the same on both sides of the pond. However, my own bad experience of following American recipes with British ingredients indicates that there may be minor differences in a lot of things, so perhaps the baking powder isn't quite the same after all ...

Pox Voldius October 25th, 2007 2:58 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by anabel (Post 4823619)
That's about right then. Bicarbonate of Soda is exactly the same thing as Sodium Bicarbonate - which you call baking soda. And baking powder appears to be the same on both sides of the pond. However, my own bad experience of following American recipes with British ingredients indicates that there may be minor differences in a lot of things, so perhaps the baking powder isn't quite the same after all ...

Quite possibly.

What other ingredients seem different, out of curiosity?

mac_attack October 25th, 2007 3:21 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Sorry, just wanted to add that even though zuchinni is a squash, it's used a lot in breads, cakes, and brownies. :D Zuchinni bread is good...when my mom makes it, it tastes like cinnamon. :drool:

Pox Voldius October 25th, 2007 3:51 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
^ Pumpkin is a squash, too. I like pumpkin bread & pumpkin pie. :D

mac_attack October 25th, 2007 4:00 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Oh, :lol: I forgot about pumpkin! :rotfl:

ginger1 October 25th, 2007 11:25 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
In the UK we're really good at using pumpkins to hollow out and carve scary faces and add candles to make halloween lanterns - but just how many of us use them to make dishes using the insides? My only memory of pumpkin pie is of a rather bland creation that one had to suffer when the trick or treaters arrived on the doorstep, bearing wedges of something you'd rather not taste. :) Have I missed out on a good food all these years?

Lash Dresden October 26th, 2007 12:02 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4824452)
Have I missed out on a good food all these years?

Yes, you have. Pumpkin pie is :drool:

mac_attack October 26th, 2007 1:26 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Rapunzel is right, pumpkin pie is :drool:! So are pumpkin cookies, pumpkin bread, and baked pumpkin seeds!

I'm making my jack-o-lantern monday night, I'm so excited! :D I can't decide between carving a monster, bat, or cat, or just words.

Pox Voldius October 26th, 2007 2:45 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4824452)
In the UK we're really good at using pumpkins to hollow out and carve scary faces and add candles to make halloween lanterns - but just how many of us use them to make dishes using the insides? My only memory of pumpkin pie is of a rather bland creation that one had to suffer when the trick or treaters arrived on the doorstep, bearing wedges of something you'd rather not taste. :) Have I missed out on a good food all these years?

Yes.

Though, I suppose it depends on the recipe, and on the source of the pumpkin purée. (I read somewhere that the pumpkins stores sell to make jack-o-lanterns out of are not the best pumpkins to make pies or bread from -- apparently those are bred for durability & not taste. But around here, in addition to selling pre-made pumpkin pies in the grocery stores, they also sell cans of already-puréed pumpkin, with no additional ingredients, just 100% pumpkin, so I use that if I'm going to bake my own pumpkin bread or pumpkin pie.)

anabel October 26th, 2007 3:48 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pox Voldius (Post 4823689)
What other ingredients seem different, out of curiosity?

I'm not sure, but in my experience most American recipes don't turn out quite the same with British ingredients. My husband returned from a stay in the US with a bunch of hand written recipes for his favourite foods. The oatmeal cookies worked out OK, but key lime pie was distinctly runny, cornbread was obviously not right, and something called Indian pudding was a smelly, indistinguishable mess! And I'm not a bad cook in general, honest!

I think British white flour is coarser than American cake flour.

Pox Voldius October 27th, 2007 4:06 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by anabel (Post 4825031)
I'm not sure, but in my experience most American recipes don't turn out quite the same with British ingredients. My husband returned from a stay in the US with a bunch of hand written recipes for his favourite foods. The oatmeal cookies worked out OK, but key lime pie was distinctly runny, cornbread was obviously not right, and something called Indian pudding was a smelly, indistinguishable mess! And I'm not a bad cook in general, honest!

I think British white flour is coarser than American cake flour.

Hmm...I use "all-purpose flour" that says on the package "presifted * enriched * bleached". Listed ingredients are "bleached wheat flour enriched (niacin, reduced iron, thiamine mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid), malted barley flour".
[That's like the cheapest flour my grocery store carries. :whistle:]

Though, I'm afraid I can't help you with the key lime pie, cornbread, or Indian pudding, as I've never made any of those.

edit

Oh, Wikipedia has a short section on the differences between different kinds of flour --> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flour#Types_of_flour

BTW, any recipe used in my family that calls for flour generally assumes that it will be all-purpose flour, which is apparently different from cake flour.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Wikipedia
In Britain, many flours go by names different than those from America. Some American flours and British equivalents include:

Cake and pastry flour = soft flour
All-purpose flour = plain flour
Bread flour = strong flour, hard flour
Self-rising flour = self-raising flour
Whole-wheat flour = wholemeal flour


ginger1 October 27th, 2007 9:43 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
The main problem with trying to use american recipes in the UK is that we don't use cups for measuring, and although there are several web sites for converting US cups to UK oz (or grams now) it's still confusing. And australian cup sizes are different again, yes? (Still talking cooking, not female undergarments - that's a whole different subject :) )

RavenEye October 27th, 2007 1:34 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4825788)
The main problem with trying to use american recipes in the UK is that we don't use cups for measuring, and although there are several web sites for converting US cups to UK oz (or grams now) it's still confusing. And australian cup sizes are different again, yes? (Still talking cooking, not female undergarments - that's a whole different subject :) )

I've never got a recipe using cups to work yet. 1 cup always seems to be too much compared to the amounts for the other ingredients. Don't get me started on doing things with the insides of pumpkins either - it'll be going in the compost bin again this year.

Lyra Black October 27th, 2007 3:10 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4825788)
And australian cup sizes are different again, yes?

In Australia a cup is 250ml, a teaspoon is 5ml and a tablespoon is 20ml. The cup and teaspoon measurements are the same in NZ, Canada and the UK but in these 3 countries a tablespoon is 15ml. I attempted to get the USA conversions but I couldn't find consistent numbers!

This site may be useful for some people. It describes several measurement conversions and also has this useful information about flour:
Quote:

US & UK all purpose and plain flour can be interchanged without any adjustments. US cake flour is lighter however, and can be substituted with 1 cup minus 3 Tbsp. of all purpose/plain flour, and add 3 Tbsp. of cornstarch or potato flour to make the full cup. Self rising flour can be made by substituting 1 cup of all purpose/plain flour minus 2 tsp., and add 1 1/2 tsp. baking powder and 1/2 tsp. salt to make the full cup. US whole wheat flour is interchangeable with UK wholemeal flour.
I can give no guarantee that the above will work :)

Pox Voldius October 27th, 2007 7:05 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
The measuring cup I have has cups, oz, and ml marked on it -- it says 1 cup = 8oz, or somewhere about halfway between 225ml and 250ml.
(edit: I pulled out my other measuring cup, of a different brand, that I don't use much because it's plastic and doesn't wash off as well, and it appears to agree with the first measuring cup, with the 8oz or halfway between 225ml & 250ml)

Of course, maybe the easiest way to solve your problem with the cups in American recipes might be to just buy an American measuring cup off of eBay or somewhere ;)

edit

I pulled out my measuring spoons, too. The labels on them read:
"5ml (approx teaspoon)" and "15ml (approx tablespoon)" and "2.5ml (approx half teaspoon)"

RavenEye October 27th, 2007 7:41 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
This site is helpful for conversions:

http://www.onlineconversion.com/

Pox Voldius October 27th, 2007 7:55 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RavenEye (Post 4826102)
This site is helpful for conversions:

http://www.onlineconversion.com/

Oh, interesting. So our ounces are a tiny bit larger than your ounces...

Quote:

Originally Posted by onlineconversion.com
1 ounce [US, liquid] = 1.040 842 731 ounce [UK, liquid]
8 ounce [US, liquid] = 8.326 741 846 ounce [UK, liquid]

The US cups to ml seems to agree fairly well with my measuring cups, though.

anabel October 28th, 2007 10:51 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RavenEye (Post 4825870)
Don't get me started on doing things with the insides of pumpkins either - it'll be going in the compost bin again this year.

I know it's off topic, but wouldn't you like to try making pumpkin juice?

Or this one:
Quote:

Bake your Halloween jack o'lantern in the oven.
(watch the face distort and shrink - it's fun!)
Strain your pumpkin, saving the juice separately from the strained pumpkin.
Serve your chilled pumpkin juice to your guests!

This takes a good hour or two, depending on the size of your jack o'lantern, so keep checking your pumpkin as it is baking. Use a cookie sheet underneath so you can easily take the hot mushy pumpkin out of the oven and to catch any drippings. If your pumpkin was not carved, cut it in half before baking, otherwise it could explode and make a GIGANTIC mess! You will see that the juice separates from the pumpkin flesh as it starts to bake, so spoon off this juice periodically and save it so it doesn't leak all over your oven. Once your pumpkin flesh has baked long enough to be good and soft, remove from the oven and let it cool. Scoop the pumpkin flesh from the skin into a strainer with a container underneath. Use a spoon to squeeze out the juice from the pumpkin, so you have as "solid" a puree as possible, which you should save for your Pumpkin Pasties, pumpkin bread, or your favorite pie recipe.

Ironically, this is always how I strained my pumpkin after baking, since if you don't, you end up with a very watery pumpkin pie, but I always just discarded the pumpkin juice before. Now I freeze my pumpkin and pumpkin juice separately in plastic containers, and they can keep over a year in the freezer quite well. After thawing the pumpkin, you can strain again for even better results (and more pumpkin juice!) since during freezing, the ice crystals were separated from the pumpkin naturally.

I did try using pumpkin pie spice mixture to flavor my juice, but I thought the flavor was too strong. I actually prefer plain, unsweetened pumpkin juice, since it is quite refreshing and tastes a bit like iced tea. My guests liked the Butterbeer much better though! ;)
I found my American recipes worked much better when I had someone send me a set of proper American measuring cups. But the only cornbread that ever turned out right was from a recipe in an English magazine, where I presume the necessary adjustments to British ingredients had already been made.

mac_attack October 28th, 2007 11:06 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
If you really want the recipes for things like American cakes, cornbreads, puddings, etc. to turn out right, I'd recommend just going to an American supermarket (or online if you can't get over here) and buying a cheap set of measuring cups as well as a box of instant cake, cornbread, pudding, etc. mix. ;) Most of these mixes you only have to add some water, oil, and eggs to...some take only water.

That's how most of my things get cooked...cooking from scratch takes too long and I'm almost guaranteed to mess it up. If I'm already making homemade chili, I don't want to have to make a huge mess of the kitchen at my attempts at cornbread...it's easier to just use the boxed stuff. ;) In case the Brits here don't know (though you probably already do) if you make cornbread, I'd recommend serving it with chili...they go awesomely together. :drool:

Just a question...some British names for food have made me do a double-take in the past (spotted dick, bangers and mash...things like that). Are there American foods that sound quite strange to you?

anabel October 28th, 2007 11:12 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4827293)
Just a question...some British names for food have made me do a double-take in the past (spotted dick, bangers and mash...things like that). Are there American foods that sound quite strange to you?

Not to mention these yummy meatballs, whose name I cannot type here because the autocensor doesn't like it!

Pox Voldius October 29th, 2007 12:12 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by anabel (Post 4827303)
Not to mention these yummy meatballs, whose name I cannot type here because the autocensor doesn't like it!

Erm...I'm getting a 404 error when I try that link -- I think the autocensor got to your URL as well :shrug:

Chris October 29th, 2007 12:18 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pox Voldius (Post 4827375)
Erm...I'm getting a 404 error when I try that link -- I think the autocensor got to your URL as well :shrug:

Darned autocensor :argh:

Pox Voldius October 29th, 2007 12:25 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Oh! I think I've found it! (by doing a Google search on Mr Brains Pack meatballs)

Is it this?
http://separatedbyacommonlanguage.bl...1_archive.html
(scroll down to the second entry for July 3rd)

anabel October 29th, 2007 1:16 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Yupp - that's the one. They are very tasty and it's not a derogatory word in Britain!


ginger1 October 30th, 2007 12:23 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
It's an odd word altogether. :) In the UK slang for a cigarette end is a f-- end. Also a cigarette is a f--. (I'm using dashes because I don't know how much would be subject to asterisks). But the main use of the word which is questionable in Britain (not necessarily for it's other meanings in the US, but because of the oddities of British society - is that a f-- at a public school is a junior boy who runs errands for a senior.

And a public school (here) is not public at all, but one that needs to be paid for, and therefore, very private, and I guess it's all very different over the pond?

Youdan October 30th, 2007 2:58 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
F-- also used as instead of tired. School boy F-- do the tiresome or boring jobs.
There is a book out from the editor of the Canadian Oxfrod dictionary about words used in Canada. Rain gutter = eavestrough. funny book. Only in Canada you say

Pox Voldius October 30th, 2007 3:52 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4828409)
And a public school (here) is not public at all, but one that needs to be paid for, and therefore, very private, and I guess it's all very different over the pond?

Yes. Here, "public schools" are the free* ones, and the ones you have to pay for are called "private schools".

(*but you still have to pay textbook & locker fees, and buy your own school supplies & P.E. uniforms, and that sort of thing)

MC2456 October 30th, 2007 8:01 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Hey, in Asia, our kind of porridge is the one where we eat with our food (eg, meat, veggies that kinda stuff.) It is made out of rice (the kind of rice you get from Thailand.) and cooked with water until it becomes very soft. I understand you call this 'congee' in US. Well, here we call it porridge.

I also read in some books that people in the UK eat porridge with sugar during breakfast. Is it similar to our kind of porridge made with rice, or is it made of oats? I would want to ask because I find it very confusing to read that some people eat porridge with sugar during breakfast. Hope you can reply me quick!

Mundungus Fletc October 30th, 2007 8:59 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
British porridge is made with oats ("A grain that in England is fed to horses and in Scotland supports the people," according to Dr Johnson) It is eaten with sugar for breakfast though some people prefer salt.

MC2456 October 30th, 2007 9:10 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Thanks Mundungus Fletc! That cleared my mis-understanding, as in Asia we eat either porridge or rice as a staple food, like how you in the US and UK eat bread or potatoes, yes?

Pox Voldius October 30th, 2007 3:41 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MC2456 (Post 4828928)
Thanks Mundungus Fletc! That cleared my mis-understanding, as in Asia we eat either porridge or rice as a staple food, like how you in the US and UK eat bread or potatoes, yes?

I'm not so sure about bread or potatoes as a staple food (unless maybe it's Ireland before the Potato Famine)... I think I would probably have gone with beef, chicken, and fish. Bread & potatoes are more of an accessory for those.

YellowPoofBall October 30th, 2007 7:50 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MC2456 (Post 4828901)
Hey, in Asia, our kind of porridge is the one where we eat with our food (eg, meat, veggies that kinda stuff.) It is made out of rice (the kind of rice you get from Thailand.) and cooked with water until it becomes very soft. I understand you call this 'congee' in US. Well, here we call it porridge.

We call it porridge in the US too. The only time I've ever seen it called congee is in Vietnamese restaurants.

PrezLeefun October 31st, 2007 12:50 am

British or English I need help NOW!
 
Please someone who actually is british or english- hell from the UK set me straight because I may have insulted someone.

I was just told that it is an insult to call a british person "british" someone set me right on the proper vernacular please.

ginger1 October 31st, 2007 11:08 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Well, if you know which country they live in it's easy - from Wales, call them Welsh, from England, call them English etc - but usually it's difficult to tell. So we're all from the UK - call us British - I am from England, but I don't mind being called British :) at all.

anabel October 31st, 2007 11:53 am

Re: British or English I need help NOW!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by PrezLeefun (Post 4829702)
I was just told that it is an insult to call a british person "british" someone set me right on the proper vernacular please.

It is not an insult at all. We don't generally call ourselves that, but we are all British.

PrezLeefun October 31st, 2007 1:47 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4830076)
Well, if you know which country they live in it's easy - from Wales, call them Welsh, from England, call them English etc - but usually it's difficult to tell. So we're all from the UK - call us British - I am from England, but I don't mind being called British :) at all.

Ok cool. I didnt insult anyone.... yay. :tu: Thank you guys.

Quickquill October 31st, 2007 3:17 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by hermy_weasley2 (Post 4820628)
I think that actually depends on who you ask--I overheard a conversation about this the other day. :lol: But, yeah, they're at least pretty similar. I've noticed that all the scones I've ever eaten (which doesn't amount to much) are less fluffy than a lot of American biscuits though, but that may just be me.

As far as I can tell, what the British call scones are what Americans call muffins. (A kind of quick-bread baked in a cupcake tin, usually without paper liners.) What we (Americans) call buscuits are made from a slightly stiffer batter that can be rolled out, cut into shape and baked on a tray. What we call "English Muffins" are apparrently cast in a ring on a tray from a relatively loose batter, and are wider than most muffins. Are they what the English call scones?

Regarding Pumpkin Pie etc. - apparently there are different varieties of pumpkin that are popular in differrent regions. In America, the round pumpkins are popular because of the tradition of carving Jack-o-Lanterns. They have a nice large cavity inside and not much flesh. Here in Israel, the common pumpkin is huge, and somewhat irregularly shaped with thick flesh that when cooked mashes up somewhat stringy. The American pumpkins mash up like potatoes, and are more suitable for making pie filling. Here the closest I can get to them is called a " Georgian" or a "dry" pumpkin. It doesn't really matter which variety of pumpkin is used as far as taste is concerned. If you have a good recipe, the pie will be tasty. Most of the charachteristic taste of pumpkin pie comes from the spices used anyway.

mac_attack November 1st, 2007 9:13 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Eddie Izzard has a hilarious bit about the differences in the languages. It's most definitely not family friendly, though, so I won't post a link. It is funny though.

What is the difference in puddings? Here, pudding is dessert. Is it different over there?

I've heard lots of people say "hire" instead of "rent" (ex: "we're going to hire a car") So do you guys use hire to mean as in "hired at a job", or is there another word for that?

Lyra Black November 2nd, 2007 5:23 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Quickquill (Post 4830168)
As far as I can tell, what the British call scones are what Americans call muffins. (A kind of quick-bread baked in a cupcake tin, usually without paper liners.) What we (Americans) call buscuits are made from a slightly stiffer batter that can be rolled out, cut into shape and baked on a tray. What we call "English Muffins" are apparrently cast in a ring on a tray from a relatively loose batter, and are wider than most muffins. Are they what the English call scones?

No! Muffins are not scones.

Scones are bread rather than cake, eaten as a mid morning or mid afternoon snack with jam, cream or butter, about 3-4cm in diameter and 2-3cm high, baked in an oven.
http://www.longorshortcapital.com/bl...%2520Scone.jpg


American style muffins (which are also called muffins in the UK) are much larger than scones and have an entirely different texture, a muffin being somewhere between bread and cake. It's also not usual to put any flavouring in a scone as the flavouring comes from the jam or whatever you like to put on. Muffins on the other hand come in many different flavours.
http://findingmyself.net/UserFiles/Image/muffin.jpg


British style muffins (called English muffins outside the UK) are disk-like bread cooked in a pan on the stove or in a toaster and eaten for breakfast. Can be substituted for ordinary bread in a sandwich and filled with lots of different things, anything from just butter to practically a whole English breakfast.
http://www.imaginatorium.org/pics/b02406muff.jpg

RavenEye November 2nd, 2007 9:20 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4831203)
What is the difference in puddings? Here, pudding is dessert. Is it different over there?

Pudding is dessert (as in the course) and also the name for specific hot desserts like steamed sponge pudding.

Quote:

I've heard lots of people say "hire" instead of "rent" (ex: "we're going to hire a car") So do you guys use hire to mean as in "hired at a job", or is there another word for that?
Rent (the verb) is usually just applied to property, while hire is more general.

anabel November 4th, 2007 12:21 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RavenEye (Post 4832046)
Pudding is dessert (as in the course) and also the name for specific hot desserts like steamed sponge pudding.

Or steak and kidney pudding! Puddings can be savoury too.

Pox Voldius November 4th, 2007 1:28 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Ah, see, in the U.S., "pudding" is pretty much just stuff like this:
http://g-ec2.images-amazon.com/image...KL._AA160_.jpg

Goopy stuff that comes in flavors like chocolate, vanilla, butterscotch, caramel, and tapioca, and it's served chilled or at room temperature. Mostly stuff made by the Jell-O company.

Anything else, and you have to state specifically what kind, like "rice pudding".

mac_attack November 4th, 2007 2:08 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Mundungus Fletc (Post 4828922)
British porridge is made with oats ("A grain that in England is fed to horses and in Scotland supports the people," according to Dr Johnson) It is eaten with sugar for breakfast though some people prefer salt.

We call that oatmeal. :) My dad makes it for me with brown sugar. Perfect breakfast on a cold morning.

And to add to Pox's pudding list, I have to say that tapioca pudding is the nastiest stuff I've ever experienced. It's not the flavor, it's the texture. (my friend refers to it as booger pudding. :nc:)

RavenEye November 4th, 2007 5:03 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4833277)
We call that oatmeal. :) My dad makes it for me with brown sugar. Perfect breakfast on a cold morning.

Oatmeal's more like a coarse oat flour here, porridge is flaked oats.

Quote:

And to add to Pox's pudding list, I have to say that tapioca pudding is the nastiest stuff I've ever experienced. It's not the flavor, it's the texture. (my friend refers to it as booger pudding. :nc:)
Agree about tapioca. I like rice pudding though.

anabel November 5th, 2007 12:22 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4833277)
And to add to Pox's pudding list, I have to say that tapioca pudding is the nastiest stuff I've ever experienced. It's not the flavor, it's the texture. (my friend refers to it as booger pudding. )

We used to call it frogspawn ... but I've always liked it.

ginger1 November 6th, 2007 12:20 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Oh, goodness, frogspawn - one of the truly vile memories from school dinners in England in the fifties. And semolina with a dollop of red (I won't even give it the distinction of being called raspberry jam) stuff plonked in the centre. Enthusiastically stirred around by my classmates until it resembled red wallpaper paste. A horrible, haunting memory. Bleeeuuuggghhh.

Luna would have hated it.

8m57w6 November 6th, 2007 4:47 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
*shudders* You should've seen some of the fits I threw over tapioca. It was that bad. I hated the stuff, still do, in fact, though I thankfully haven't had to endure it for years.

CakeorDeath November 6th, 2007 10:20 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I am the only person in the world who likes semolina?

JadeOwl November 6th, 2007 10:47 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by CakeorDeath (Post 4835872)
I am the only person in the world who likes semolina?

Nope! I like it quite a bit, to be honest. :)

anabel November 6th, 2007 11:31 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by CakeorDeath (Post 4835872)
I am the only person in the world who likes semolina?

I haven't eaten it in about 100 years, but I did like it at school. But as Ginger says, the red stuff plonked in the middle could hardly be called jam!

So to get back on topic ... do you have semolina or tapioca puddings in the US and if so, what do you call them?

Pox Voldius November 7th, 2007 2:44 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Well, I know we have tapioca pudding here, and it is called tapioca pudding (it's one of the flavors of pre-packaged pudding that Jell-O makes)... but I'm not sure about the semolina pudding, I don't think I've ever seen that.

mac_attack November 7th, 2007 2:45 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
We have Tapioca Pudding. I've never heard of Semolina, though.

On the subject of food...what in the world is Picallily?? :eeep: What is Vimto??

Pox Voldius November 7th, 2007 2:52 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Actually, I think that until the discussion of it in this thread, the only time I'd ever heard of semolina was in a line from the Beatles song "I Am the Walrus": Semolina pilchard climbing up the Eiffel Tower...

Sheree November 7th, 2007 2:56 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pox Voldius (Post 4836108)
Actually, I think that until the discussion of it in this thread, the only time I'd ever heard of semolina was in a line from the Beatles song "I Am the Walrus": Semolina pilchard climbing up the Eiffel Tower...

Actually, you're probably pretty familiar with another form of semolina, even if you don't know it - here it's packaged as "Cream of Wheat."

Pox Voldius November 7th, 2007 2:57 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sheree (Post 4836112)
Actually, you're probably pretty familiar with another form of semolina, even if you don't know it - here it's packaged as "Cream of Wheat."

Actually... nope, not familiar with "Cream of Wheat", sorry :no:

Mundungus Fletc November 7th, 2007 7:49 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4836102)
On the subject of food...what in the world is Picallily?? :eeep: What is Vimto??

Picallili (delicious with cold meat) and Vimto

MC2456 November 7th, 2007 2:39 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4833277)
We call that oatmeal. :) My dad makes it for me with brown sugar. Perfect breakfast on a cold morning.

And to add to Pox's pudding list, I have to say that tapioca pudding is the nastiest stuff I've ever experienced. It's not the flavor, it's the texture. (my friend refers to it as booger pudding. :nc:)

Yes, I call it oatmeal too. And recently, I discovered, Americans call Asian porridge...well...porridge, and not congee! Wow, we have many similarities!

Well, enough of this porridge-y discussion. I'm drooling already, thinking about porridge! (And I just had dinner two hours ago.) :drool:

I haven't had the chance to taste real British/American pudding, but I have eaten mango pudding. When we have Chinese, my mom and I will order a bowl of mango pudding. Have any of you had the chance of tasting it yet? You have to try, it's quite nice. But then, I'm very partial to mangoes, so I do not know if it will agree with the rest of you. However, to me, anything's worth a shot. Even octopus sushi. Yum!

Well, I have another porridge-y question. *the whole cosforums groan* Sorry, y'all, it'll be my last. I swear! Um...what do the British people call the Asian-styled porridge? Thank you in advance, as it will clear my doubts and end my porridge-y questions. Thanks again, MC2456

RavenEye November 7th, 2007 8:50 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MC2456 (Post 4836441)
Well, I have another porridge-y question. *the whole cosforums groan* Sorry, y'all, it'll be my last. I swear! Um...what do the British people call the Asian-styled porridge? Thank you in advance, as it will clear my doubts and end my porridge-y questions. Thanks again, MC2456

Congee.

anabel November 7th, 2007 11:48 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mac_attack (Post 4836102)
On the subject of food...what in the world is Picallily?? What is Vimto??

Picallilly is a yummy, bright yellow pickle, with cauliflower as one of the main ingredients, flavoured and coloured with mustard and turmeric. Vimto is a fruit flavour fizzy drink - a rather old fashioned one that my dad used to like.

Hysteria November 8th, 2007 3:38 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I have a question for Americans. Yesterday on the tram I heard some American tourists talking to a local about how things are called different things in each of their countries. The American woman said something like "I asked for cream in my coffee and the waitress was very confused". Ok, so is the cream you put in coffee the same as milk?
Edit: For example, ask for cream in Australia and this is what you could end up with:

http://img140.imageshack.us/img140/9...lecreamcu4.jpg

Pox Voldius November 8th, 2007 4:15 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I'm pretty sure that cream for coffee is not the same milk.

But I'm not much of a coffee drinker.
Here's what Wikipedia has to say on the matter of different kinds of cream --> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cream#Types_of_cream

Hysteria November 8th, 2007 4:28 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

From Wiki:
Half cream 12% is not sterilised Only used in coffee
Ok then what would be the difference between that and milk?


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