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-   -   "separated by a common language" (http://www.cosforums.com/showthread.php?t=113174)

MC2456 November 8th, 2007 3:37 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I don't think it's like milk. Milk seems more...liquid. The cream one puts in one's cup of coffee seems more thick, but not as thick as the one Hysteria showed us in the picture, though. I dunno...I don't really drink coffee with cream. I drink it with milk.

Pox Voldius November 8th, 2007 4:59 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Hysteria (Post 4837077)
Quote:

From Wiki:
Half cream 12% is not sterilised Only used in coffee
Ok then what would be the difference between that and milk?

Wouldn't know, that example came from Wiki's UK creams list.

The US creams list is just above that on the page, and shows "Light, coffee, or table cream (18–30% fat)" as being used for coffee, so that would be heavier than your 12% half cream. It would appear to correspond most closely with the "Cream or single cream | 18% | is not sterilised | Poured over puddings, used in coffee" from the UK creams list.

edit

Though Wiki did have this to say in its article on milk:
Quote:

Upon standing for 12 to 24 hours, fresh milk has a tendency to separate into a high-fat cream layer on top of a larger, low-fat milk layer. The cream is often sold as a separate product with its own uses; today the separation of the cream from the milk is usually accomplished rapidly in centrifugal cream separators.
Hrm... and apparently US "whole milk" only has 3-4% milk fat --> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milk#Varieties_and_brands
So any kind of cream would be heavier than milk, I guess.

unconvinced November 8th, 2007 11:14 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pox Voldius (Post 4837140)
So any kind of cream would be heavier than milk, I guess

Wouldn't cream be lighter because of the higher fat content?

JadeOwl November 8th, 2007 3:24 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
What goes into coffee is definitely much closer in appearance and function to milk.

In technical terms, when milk is gathered from the farmers, it is all transported in one large drum. Then it goes in for processing. The two products that come out of the initial stage of processing are skim milk (milk with virtually no butter-fat left) and cream (butter-fat). This is the cream that we Americans put into our tea and coffee.

In order to get milk with higher percentages of fat, say 2% or even whole milk, butter fat is added BACK in to the skim milk from the initial step.

Does that help to clarify things?

kala_way November 8th, 2007 3:50 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
So then what's the difference between cream and whole milk? I thought whole milk was milk with the full "from the cow" fat content.

EDIT: oh wait, I'm a dork, I get it. Cream is only the butter fat and whole milk is the milk and the butter fat. :yuhup:

Pox Voldius November 8th, 2007 5:26 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by unconvinced (Post 4837252)
Wouldn't cream be lighter because of the higher fat content?

Meh...perhaps I should have said "heavier on the fat content" then :shrug:

Hysteria November 9th, 2007 2:48 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Maybe I should never have asked :lol: But I think I get it now, thanks :)

Pox Voldius November 12th, 2007 12:31 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Okay, here's a question that's come to mind:

What do people in the UK usually call their grandmothers & grandfathers?

Y'know, apart from "grandmother" and "grandfather", which sounds so very formal to me. Is it "Gran" like Neville says? or "Nana"? or "Grandmum"? or...? Does anyone use "Grandma" & "Grandpa" or "Gramma" & "Grampa"?

My family (from Iowa & Wisconsin) tends to use "Gran(d)ma" & "Grampa" or "Gran(d)pa". [I dunno, you don't always hear the Ds in it when we say it in my family...]

And what about for great-grandparents?

mac_attack November 12th, 2007 2:32 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
^ As an American, I refer to my grandparents differently, depending on if it's my mom's parents or my dad's. :)

My maternal grandmother (mom's mom) I call Nana. My maternal grandfather (mom's dad) I called Papa when I was very young. When I got older I called him Grampa. I've recently started referring to him as Papa again, even though he passed away three years ago. I just think Papa suits him better.

My paternal grandmother (Dad's mom...I don't need to keep adding this do I?) I called Gramma Gene. (Her first name was Gene.) And here it gets kinda tricky...my dad's biological dad I only met a few times, so mostly he was referred to as "dad's dad", but sometimes I called him Grampa Jan. My dad's step-dad is called Grampa Lee. :) (My dad's step-mother is a horrible woman and is not considered family and is not referred to at all.)

Great Grandparents in my family, on my mom's side, are referred to as Gramma-Great or Grampa-Great. :) One of the grandkids started saying that when they were very young and it stuck.

The few Brits that I've met have all used Nan and Grandad. They all are from England if that makes a difference to what they call grandparents.

anabel November 12th, 2007 9:30 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
It's a very individual thing, based on personal preference. Grandma, Gran, Granny, Nana, Nan and Nanny are all quite usual, I think, as are Grandad, Grandpa and Gramps. And some families have more personal names.

unconvinced November 12th, 2007 9:54 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Pox Voldius (Post 4839767)
My family (from Iowa & Wisconsin) tends to use "Gran(d)ma" & "Grampa" or "Gran(d)pa". [I dunno, you don't always hear the Ds in it when we say it in my family...]

Yeah that's what I use (without the D's)

anabel November 12th, 2007 11:04 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by unconvinced (Post 4840102)
Yeah that's what I use (without the D's)

I don't think anyone pronounces the ds over here either. But we still write them, apart from the second d in grandad (grand-dad), which I believe is always omitted even though my Firefox spellcheck disagrees with me!

unconvinced November 12th, 2007 1:15 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by anabel (Post 4840129)
I don't think anyone pronounces the ds over here either. But we still write them, apart from the second d in grandad (grand-dad), which I believe is always omitted even though my Firefox spellcheck disagrees with me!

Yeah I think it's an illision (or is that ellision) so there wouldn't be 2 ds.

MC2456 November 13th, 2007 2:37 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
What about parents then? Do you guys call them Pop or Papa or Daddy or Dad or just plain 'Father'. For mothers, do you guys called Ma, Mama, Mummy, Momma, Mum or Mother?

Pox Voldius November 13th, 2007 5:08 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
(United States)

I call my parents "Mom" & "Dad".

(Though, occasionally I'll use "Mother" if Mom is being unnecessarily embarrassing or disgusting ;))

kala_way November 13th, 2007 5:20 am

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Mommy and Daddy when I was small, then Mom and Dad.

Grandparents I called Papa and Gram

Pegasus November 13th, 2007 4:44 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Mom and Dad. When I was little they were Mommy and Daddy. I had a Grandma and Grandpa (last name) and a Grammie and Grandpa (last name). I know a lot of people use Grandma/Grandpa (first name).

unconvinced November 13th, 2007 5:00 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
I just use Mum (with a U) and dad

ginger1 November 13th, 2007 10:13 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
The most amazing day? When your son stops calling you Mummy, and starts using your Christian name. He stops being a child, you stop being a parent. You start being friends.

RavenEye November 13th, 2007 10:21 pm

Re: "separated by a common language"
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ginger1 (Post 4841449)
The most amazing day? When your son stops calling you Mummy, and starts using your Christian name. He stops being a child, you stop being a parent. You start being friends.

Isn't it really unusual for a child (even as an adult) to call his parent by their first name?


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